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View Full Version : Slime in the tires?


qwikv6
04-22-2004, 11:34 AM
I have Scag Tiger Cub. Have any of you put a product called slime in the tires to prevent flats?

LMK.

:rolleyes:

soccerlawn
04-22-2004, 11:37 AM
I have put slime in my front tires, because I have had several small leaks, and it really helps. The tires never lose air now.

MudslinginFX4
04-22-2004, 01:22 PM
We put slime in all of our mower tires, never put it in your trailer or truck tires though.

LynyrdSkynyrd
04-22-2004, 02:33 PM
I do not use it.
I try to get a tube that fits the tire. Reason being. Slime breaks down and stops working after two years. Getting the tire off of a rim that has been slimed is a pain. Slime is not good for steele rims.

I am not saying that it is a bad product nor that it does not work. It just creates to many hassles for me when it is time for new tires or if they need to be repaired.

husqvarna600c
04-22-2004, 02:38 PM
i have had one flat ,since then i have used slime in my tires and have not had any more. i only have to check the tire pressure in the tires. but do not have to worry about flats. in this business time is money! as you are using your mower and run over something that would cause a flat if you have the slime in there you would never know. it will seal itself. a big time saver!

GrassBustersLawn
04-22-2004, 02:48 PM
I started using it this season. Bought it in GALLON size at TRACTOR SUPPLY for $19.99. Have used it with GOOD RESULTS on front tires of my Toro.

Mike

sheppard
04-22-2004, 04:09 PM
Won't use a mower w/o it.

Used to have leakes all the time. When I put the Slime in I never had another leak. Got a severe gash in bald tires so I changed them and put Slime in the new tires.

Can't say enouph about it.

Get it!

S.

Trevors Lawn Care
04-22-2004, 05:32 PM
works well.................

tiedeman
04-22-2004, 05:39 PM
I have all of the walkbehinds front tries done. I was sick of getting flats in the field, so I started to use it about 2 years ago

65hoss
04-23-2004, 09:17 AM
I run it. I got it in the gallon jug size recently for the new Lazer. It works really well.

metro-hp_48
04-23-2004, 09:21 AM
Oh yeah! Good stuff.

work_it
04-23-2004, 09:30 AM
I got tired of not being able to fix flats on my front tires so I ended up putting tubes in the front tires. It's a heck of a lot easier fixing a flat on the jobsite now, and (knock on wood) I haven't had a flat in over a year now.

timinkc
04-23-2004, 11:52 AM
Iuse a similar product i found at walmart of all places, its yellow instead of green and half price...it works great!

lazer 46
04-23-2004, 03:41 PM
A few years ago I researched a few different sealers for tires. I went with a product called Amerseal which is sold in NAPA auto part stores. It claims to be a lifetime fix and does no harm to the rim. If my memory serves me right I think Slime needs to be replaced after 3 yrs. or so. Not out to argue the point, it is just what I came up with in my research.

Turfcutters Plus
04-24-2004, 04:59 AM
I put it in all my mower tires last winter.It's great insurance.Nothing worse than a flat when it's 90+ degrees outside.:)

captaingreen
04-24-2004, 07:31 AM
I would highly reccomend slime as well, great product!

grasswhacker
04-24-2004, 07:39 AM
I've used Slime for several years, while it reduced the number of flats I still had some problems retaining air. The best thing I did, bar none, was have the front tires foam filled 2 years ago. No flats since. Only do the fronts though.

GW

Heron Cove PM
04-24-2004, 07:42 AM
Originally posted by LynyrdSkynyrd
I do not use it.
I try to get a tube that fits the tire. Reason being. Slime breaks down and stops working after two years. Getting the tire off of a rim that has been slimed is a pain. Slime is not good for steele rims.

I JUST put $400.00 worth of rear rims and tires on an Exmark yesterday because whoever owned it be for me (I'm the 3rd owner) put some sort of Fix a Flat, Slime, ? in them and they did just that. It rusted the rim around the bead so bad the tire and rim would not hold air. When I FINALLY got the tires off the rims this stuff inside was decomposed in to basic mud.

I have to agree with Grasswhacker, get the fronts foam filled. Get a plug kit for the rears.

Good Luck.

LwnmwrMan22
04-24-2004, 08:02 AM
$400 worth of tires and rims?? You put those ones on that keep spinning even after you stop? Some nice 24 inchers that you see on "Pimp my Ride"?? :)

Heron Cove PM
04-24-2004, 08:09 AM
That's what I should have got.:laugh: Nope, Exmark rims and Carlisles. 2 rims and 2 tires $390.00 http://www.stopstart.freeserve.co.uk/smilie/pimp3.gif

dishboy
04-24-2004, 09:11 AM
Why not put tubes with SLIME if you are concerned with rust?

sildoc
04-25-2004, 01:17 AM
Slime just about everything. Here the blackberry thorns meander into every thing on some of my outward accounts and when I didn't slime I spent half the day changing tires or airing them up. Including the trailer.

Advance Lawncare
04-25-2004, 01:32 AM
We use slime in every tire on every mower. It is one of those things we could operate without, but it makes life a whole lot easier. I HATE having flats.

work_it
05-02-2004, 01:40 PM
Originally posted by Heron Cove PM
I JUST put $400.00 worth of rear rims and tires on an Exmark yesterday because whoever owned it be for me (I'm the 3rd owner) put some sort of Fix a Flat, Slime, ? in them and they did just that. It rusted the rim around the bead so bad the tire and rim would not hold air. When I FINALLY got the tires off the rims this stuff inside was decomposed in to basic mud.
Why didn't you just buy inner tubes? Then you wouldn't have had to spend that much money on new rims and wouldn't have had to worry about the the rim rusted around the bead.

Heron Cove PM
05-02-2004, 03:13 PM
Originally posted by work_it
Why didn't you just buy inner tubes? Then you wouldn't have had to spend that much money on new rims and wouldn't have had to worry about the the rim rusted around the bead.

I can PLUG a tire. I CAN'T PLUG a tube.

work_it
05-02-2004, 08:10 PM
You're so right. You have to use a tube patch. Just like the one on a bicycle, and also very easy to repair.

southarkansascutter
05-02-2004, 10:48 PM
Fix-a-flat is what rusts your wheels..... I am a tire repair materials salesman ... and i sell a lot of tire sealant... I sell some tire shops 2 six gallon pails a week during grass season.... good tire sealant works and does not rust rims.... I run it in everything from my mowers to 4-wheelers.... and haven't had any rim trouble.... Amerseal is one of the best (also most expensive) i am running it in my back tires now on my chopper (they sent me some samples trying to get me to sell it over my brand) ... i put some in my dads atv 3 years ago.... and we hog hunt by riding our atv's across all kinds of terain imaginable.... mainly clear cuts .....and he hasn't had a flat yet.....

Lux Lawn
05-02-2004, 11:02 PM
I have been using slime for about two years now with know problems only a little bit at a time just enough to get the job done.

Heron Cove PM
05-03-2004, 11:40 AM
Originally posted by work_it
You're so right. You have to use a tube patch. Just like the one on a bicycle, and also very easy to repair.

And YOU'RE so right. But I DON'T have time to patch a tube on a lawn in the middle of a route. I CAN however plug a tire under these condition.

work_it
05-03-2004, 10:08 PM
The only reason I went with the tubes in the tires is because it only takes me a couple minutes to fix a flat tire. Not only that, but I was having a hard time getting the front tires to reseat without a cheeta. The Exmark dealer is the most convenient dealer around, and he refused to help me reseat a tire because it's a bunton machine. I found myself driving 36 miles (round trip) out of my way to the bunton dealer 2 times in one week. On the second trip I had them put the tubes in and put an end to that problem. All-in-all it's worth a couple extra minutes to me to patch a tube than spend that much time behind a windshield. I'm not saying it's the best solution for everybody, but it sure was for me. If you still have your old rims and tires you may want to consider throwing a tube in one and keeping it around as a spare. Just a thought.

Heron Cove PM
05-04-2004, 09:57 PM
Originally posted by work_it
The only reason I went with the tubes in the tires is because it only takes me a couple minutes to fix a flat tire.

So, You can tear down a tire, patch a tube and put it all back together FASTER then you can plug a tire?

Originally posted by work_it
I found myself driving 36 miles (round trip) out of my way to the bunton dealer 2 times in one week. On the second trip I had them put the tubes in and put an end to that problem.

This is my piont. IT'S NOT the end to the problem. If I run over a nail, bolt, thorn...whatever, it's going through the tube and I'm right back where I started.

Originally posted by work_it
All-in-all it's worth a couple extra minutes to me to patch a tube than spend that much time behind a windshield.

I still can't see patching a tube on a lawn is faster then pluging a tire . SO I'm still spending needless time behind a windsheld.

Originally posted by work_it
I'm not saying it's the best solution for everybody, but it sure was for me.

This I agree.

Originally posted by work_it
If you still have your old rims and tires you may want to consider throwing a tube in one and keeping it around as a spare. Just a thought.

1 tire and rim - I was able to save and it became a spare.

work_it
05-04-2004, 10:08 PM
Originally posted by Heron Cove PM
"So, You can tear down a tire, patch a tube and put it all back together FASTER then you can plug a tire?"

In some cases yes. I just load the mower on the trailer, and do it all there. I can patch a tube in about 5 to 10 minutes, and won't have to struggle with getting the tire to re-seat in the bead.

Originally posted by Heron Cove PM This is my point. IT'S NOT the end to the problem. If I run over a nail, bolt, thorn...whatever, it's going through the tube and I'm right back where I started." [/B]

That's going to happen with or without a tube. You can have the tires foam filled to prevent that, but that's not what we were discussing.

Originally posted by Heron Cove PM "I still can't see patching a tube on a lawn is faster then plugging a tire . SO I'm still spending needless time behind a windshield." [/B]

Why are you spending needless time behind a windshield. I make my tire repairs on site now. I finish up the job, and the only windshield time is when I'm driving to my next job.

LawnMower
05-04-2004, 10:12 PM
The first thing I do in the morning is fire up the air compressor. I top up all my tires and then load up the trailer.

At this very moment, I'm considering slime.

cantoo
05-04-2004, 10:52 PM
I just slimed the front tires on our bobcat last night. One has had a slow leak for 3 weeks and today no problems. Worth the money already.

grasswhacker
05-04-2004, 10:59 PM
Solid fronts/ foam filled worth their weight in gold. No flats ever period. Only time they will need maintainence is when they wear out.

dishboy
05-05-2004, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by Heron Cove PM
I can PLUG a tire. I CAN'T PLUG a tube.



If you have slime in the tubes you don't need to plug it, that is the POINT of slime!

Heron Cove PM
05-05-2004, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by work_it
In some cases yes. I just load the mower on the trailer, and do it all there. I can patch a tube in about 5 to 10 minutes, .

You are a better man than I. I can plug a tire in about 30 seconds. But to completely tare down a tire patch a tube an put it all back together...a lot longer than 10 minutes. Are you letting the patch to even dry?

Originally posted by work_it
...and won't have to struggle with getting the tire to re-seat in the bead.

Take a strap, belt, something like that and run it all the way around the tire in the center of the tread and make it cave in. Hit it with air and IT WILL RE-SEAT.

Originally posted by work_it
That's going to happen with or without a tube. You can have the tires foam filled to prevent that, but that's not what we were discussing.

NO, with out a tube I CAN PLUG IT and get right back to work.



Originally posted by work_it
Why are you spending needless time behind a windshield. I make my tire repairs on site now. I finish up the job, and the only windshield time is when I'm driving to my next job.

I'M NOT. I"M PLUGGING MY TIRES ON THE JOB AND GETTING BACK TO WORK. If I put tubes in them then I would be.

Heron Cove PM
05-05-2004, 09:37 AM
Originally posted by dishboy
If you have slime in the tubes you don't need to plug it, that is the POINT of slime!

I'm trying to save rims here. That's the point of my post.

jrwinter74
05-05-2004, 10:03 PM
I was at my John Deere dealership when the same subject came up. They told me not to because it makes the tires heavy and when you are mowing at full speed forward and try to hit reverse, something has to give and it's usually the axle due to the forward momentum. Said they had seen several that snap like toothpicks and caused one or both hydraulic motors to fail due to contamination. Anyway, I just bought a new John Deere Ztrak last year and was interested in a "no-flat" fix before I had one. They also said it voids the warranty not to metion when you need new tires, you have to replace the tire and rim both. Hope this has helped. JW

cantoo
05-05-2004, 10:34 PM
jrwinter74, "caused one or both hydraulic motors to fail due to contamination. "
I think you need to rethink your Dealer. Contamination from slime causing the motors to fail. Sounds like a real stretch to me.

jrwinter74
05-06-2004, 08:06 AM
Contamination was from the axle breaking, not slime. JW