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GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:32 PM
Well guys, finished my largest install yet this year.

Antique shop in bad need of curb appeal. We decided to expose the ledge out front, and bring in some more rocks for a natural sort of look, and build some planting beds within the slope.

Stuck with low maintenance shurubs that do well in sandy soil, mostly conifer type -- sargents, blue rug and andorra juniper, cypress, and some barberry too.

Added big assortment of perennials -- sedum, daisy, black-eyed susan, delphinium, columbine, hens/chicks, lupine, speedwell, creeping and upright phlox, blah, blah, blah

comments? criticisms? suggestions?

Be honest please.:)

Here's a before shot (b4 spring clean-up even)

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:35 PM
after:

angle a little diff, but you should get the idea

Keep in mind very few perennials showing color up here yet.

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:37 PM
Same angle, diff view. Should have posted this one first.

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:39 PM
Final shot from the front.

I'm gonna make a return trip for picks once the perennials are in bloom.

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:45 PM
Sorry again, moderator says on 60 seconds.....

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:48 PM
different view, entering driveway

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:49 PM
one more, a little closer showing the slope

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 08:53 PM
ok, one more pic

oh, that ugly potentilla in the previous post was existing. Stuck in the corner and we'll try to revive:D

Mykster
05-22-2004, 08:59 PM
Before and after shots look great. Just a little too much rock for my tastes.

hosejockey2002
05-22-2004, 09:28 PM
Mike took the words out of my mouth. Looks great, I would have used fewer rocks up top or maybe used more contrasting colors with them.

GreenMonster
05-22-2004, 09:49 PM
Well, the rocks were really necessary to tame the slope.

I think the perennials will bring in the needed color.

Thanks for the input

NNJLandman
05-22-2004, 10:01 PM
I think it looks great man, i think the rocks look good too....i woulda gone with some larger plants...i know the ones you put in will grow....but looks like an awesome install....good job man.


Jeff

DaddyRabbit
05-22-2004, 10:36 PM
It shows a lot of genuine hard work. I would have less rock w/perhaps some/very few mounds of Topsoil with some Elephant ears, (something w/height and contrast) to go along w/say the 3 or 4 rocks I would have. Trellising might even be an option..who knows? Got to have height regardless.

bayoulawn
05-23-2004, 01:34 AM
topiaries seem out of place.

AGLA
05-23-2004, 08:39 AM
It is not too much rocks, but it is too much scattering of rocks and they can be oriented better.

People's minds work on what their minds perceive as expected. You will not find rocks on a slope that way in nature which is what makes this look out of place.

Another thing that people's brains relate to is vertical and horizontal. Those rocks do not relate to vertical or horizontal, but can if positioned well. If you look at a rock (even an odd shaped one), ask yourself which way it is leaning and correct it.

Another thing that rocks do in nature is touch other rocks. This is why grouping is important. Rocks slip down slopes over time until something stops them (like another rock).

Another natural phenomena is that moisture stays longer under rocks which tend to make plants next to them thrive more than others. Concentrate plants in your rock formations and lightly infill between formations.

Rock groupings can retain faster slope changes than scatterred individual rocks. This also allows you to make more dramatic elevation changes which you can enhance with more vertical plants.

One thing that rocks do is unify a planting. That can give you the opportunity to use highly contrasting color, a wide variety of plant forms and textures and not lose unity.

It does not look bad, but you asked for constructive criticism so I delivered.

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 08:52 AM
Originally posted by bayoulawn
topiaries seem out of place.

Yeah, I know. Customer supplied. She wanted them there.

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by AGLA
It is not too much rocks, but it is too much scattering of rocks and they can be oriented better.

People's minds work on what their minds perceive as expected. You will not find rocks on a slope that way in nature which is what makes this look out of place.

Another thing that people's brains relate to is vertical and horizontal. Those rocks do not relate to vertical or horizontal, but can if positioned well. If you look at a rock (even an odd shaped one), ask yourself which way it is leaning and correct it.

Another thing that rocks do in nature is touch other rocks. This is why grouping is important. Rocks slip down slopes over time until something stops them (like another rock).

Another natural phenomena is that moisture stays longer under rocks which tend to make plants next to them thrive more than others. Concentrate plants in your rock formations and lightly infill between formations.

Rock groupings can retain faster slope changes than scatterred individual rocks. This also allows you to make more dramatic elevation changes which you can enhance with more vertical plants.

One thing that rocks do is unify a planting. That can give you the opportunity to use highly contrasting color, a wide variety of plant forms and textures and not lose unity.

It does not look bad, but you asked for constructive criticism so I delivered.

I appreciate the constructive input:)

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 09:02 AM
Originally posted by GreenMonster
I appreciate the constructive input:)

Most of the height and texture variation is intended to come out with the perennials. Most of them are very immature at this point, such as 4" jacob's ladder that should reach 2'. The phlox and columbine on the lower portions of the slope should also help.

Ideally, placement of daisy, delphinium, salvia, etc around the sign will bring color and draw attention there as well.

Thanks for comments

fga
05-23-2004, 09:47 AM
Looks great dude. I love the rocks. Maybe you can landscape Johnny Damon's face and make that look better also........ before and after pics are always appreciated!

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by fga
Looks great dude. I love the rocks. Maybe you can landscape Johnny Damon's face and make that look better also........ before and after pics are always appreciated!

Didn't you hear? He shaved off the beard for charity. Now, if we could just get him to cut his hair a little.

I thought you might like the job Adam, I mean, there aren't even any rocks down in the asphalt jungle, right? :D

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 02:35 PM
Hey D Felix,

I've been waiting for your input.

Just don't give it to me when you're in bad mood -- I know how vicious you can be. :D

i.e. wait until you finger heals:rolleyes:

D Felix
05-23-2004, 02:57 PM
MAN, I give one opinion on tacky-a$$ concrete curbing (and the associated landscape), and I'm forever labeled!:D:D:D

I realize you are in a different geographic region than I am, so what I am used to seeing is a little different than what you have there. In other words, take the next paragraph with a little grain of salt, realizing the geographic differences and everything that is associated with it.

Had I done that job around here, I would have used either granite boulders that are more rounded, or sandstone that is more regular shaped with slightly softer edges. What you used is too angular for me, though that is the difference between New England and central Indiana!

I'm not that vicious, BTW, just tend to speak freely.:D Without being there and seeing everything that was planted, I may have used more evergreens to soften the rocks more in the winter time. I realize the perennials should do that when they fill out, but they are 8-9 month plants, not year-round.

Definately get some pics when things are blooming, and try to remember to post some in a couple of years when things fill out. I know fully well that a new 'scape looks entirely different than a mature one!

I see the mini-ex in the background, did you break down and buy one yet or is it a rental?


Dan

o-so-n-so
05-23-2004, 07:15 PM
I think you done a great job.

From the photos as to what I can see and depending on what the customer wanted I would have designed/build as followed.

1. Try to capture the natural look of the rock in the first photo. The rocks left in the photo and up the grade I see dark looking rock in a natural setting.
I think that look in the middle and to the lower of the front area that your scaping.
2.Excavate a little off the top to level and to bring that soil onto and in between the natural rock.
3. Sod the top area up to the natural rock area. Slow bends in the grass/bed border with a slightly large bed at the drive entrance with a informal plant placement with some vertical and color contrast.
4. Mulch bed areas with special plant placement for your zone at the rocks.

The rocks look a little out of place. Too many and bright. Not natural.

The rock should look as if it was pushed out from the inners of the earth. IMO.


Your work looks great. I would have done a little different though.

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 08:35 PM
Originally posted by D Felix
MAN, I give one opinion on tacky-a$$ concrete curbing (and the associated landscape), and I'm forever labeled!:D:D:D

I realize you are in a different geographic region than I am, so what I am used to seeing is a little different than what you have there. In other words, take the next paragraph with a little grain of salt, realizing the geographic differences and everything that is associated with it.

Had I done that job around here, I would have used either granite boulders that are more rounded, or sandstone that is more regular shaped with slightly softer edges. What you used is too angular for me, though that is the difference between New England and central Indiana!

I'm not that vicious, BTW, just tend to speak freely.:D Without being there and seeing everything that was planted, I may have used more evergreens to soften the rocks more in the winter time. I realize the perennials should do that when they fill out, but they are 8-9 month plants, not year-round.

Definately get some pics when things are blooming, and try to remember to post some in a couple of years when things fill out. I know fully well that a new 'scape looks entirely different than a mature one!

I see the mini-ex in the background, did you break down and buy one yet or is it a rental?


Dan

Yeah Dan, the mini is mine, well, the bank's. It's a 99 x331 with rubber tracks and thumb.

I considered going with more evergreens, but budgetary constraints really prevented addition of any more plants. Honestly, I would have liked to have had a few more in there. That said, once the blue rug and sargents start crawling, they're gonna spread quite a bit over the rocks.

I would have liked the rocks to be even more "edgy" to match the existing ledge better, but this is the best match I could come up with.

Oh well, customer is happy, and had lots of compliments. I knew I needed to post some pics on lawnsite in order to bring my ego back down a few notches.:p

GreenMonster
05-23-2004, 08:47 PM
Originally posted by o-so-n-so
I think you done a great job.

From the photos as to what I can see and depending on what the customer wanted I would have designed/build as followed.

1. Try to capture the natural look of the rock in the first photo. The rocks left in the photo and up the grade I see dark looking rock in a natural setting.
I think that look in the middle and to the lower of the front area that your scaping.
2.Excavate a little off the top to level and to bring that soil onto and in between the natural rock.
3. Sod the top area up to the natural rock area. Slow bends in the grass/bed border with a slightly large bed at the drive entrance with a informal plant placement with some vertical and color contrast.
4. Mulch bed areas with special plant placement for your zone at the rocks.

The rocks look a little out of place. Too many and bright. Not natural.

The rock should look as if it was pushed out from the inners of the earth. IMO.


Your work looks great. I would have done a little different though.

The rocks in the left are natural ledge, which as replied to DFelix, I attempted to procure but couldn't come up with.:(

We had originally planned on sod at the top, but decided that a patch of grass was going to be a maint. issue (not a maint. acct for me)

"Mulch bed areas with special plant placement..."??? Not sure what you are saying, but the bed areas within the slope for the most part have perennials. Most are immature and will show up better later in the season, and more so in the future.

We tried to make the rocks look as though they were "pushed out", while still creating planting "beds". Oh well, natural look can be tough to achieve. I remember commenting to my helper when we were setting the rocks "We should have sold them on a block wall" :)

I agree with a lot of you guys on additional plants and more vertical offset, but we used a plant list developed by a "designer" friend of hers. They didn't want a lot of vertical plants to take away from the sign. IMO, when the plants mature a little more, there will be some color contrast with the barberry, blue rug, sargents, gold tip juniper, and golden cypress. Mature and blooming perennials will also provide much color. Budget not being an issue, I probably would have done things a little different too. Excavation and setting rocks adds up fast though and chews away at the budget quickly.

Good input though, all things I will consider on future projects. Thanks.

Hrock
05-23-2004, 08:49 PM
hey nice avatar bro, go pats, go sox!

economiclawncare
05-23-2004, 08:53 PM
first thing i saw was that there are to MANY ROCKs that is the first thing i thought about

o-so-n-so
05-23-2004, 10:34 PM
I completely understand the whole picture.

I would hire you in a minute for any project based on what I see and your comments.

Its easy to snap that picture and ask "How's this look?"

Alot of things have to be taken into consideration. I can tell you just didn't start throwing rocks in there. The plants will accent and soften the rocks in time.

I would like to see this scape in 2 years from now. I'll say it will look awesome.



Good job....................................................A

RedWingsDet
05-23-2004, 11:55 PM
that looks awsome. also, how long inbetween the pics is there, notice the trees are leaveless then have awsome green leaves. hehe. that looks awsome though!

Big M LawnnSnow
05-24-2004, 04:50 AM
Looks nice and neat.
Good work but I too think a few less rocks or some contrasting rocks would work better.

fga
05-24-2004, 09:47 AM
Originally posted by GreenMonster
Didn't you hear? He shaved off the beard for charity. Now, if we could just get him to cut his hair a little.

I thought you might like the job Adam, I mean, there aren't even any rocks down in the asphalt jungle, right? :D

Sometimes, crack cocaine is refferred to as rock.........:dizzy:

GreenMonster
05-24-2004, 07:06 PM
Originally posted by PremierLandscaping
that looks awsome. also, how long inbetween the pics is there, notice the trees are leaveless then have awsome green leaves. hehe. that looks awsome though!

Before pic was taken early March before Spring clean-up.

GreenMonster
05-24-2004, 07:20 PM
Originally posted by o-so-n-so
I completely understand the whole picture.

I would hire you in a minute for any project based on what I see and your comments.

[B]Its easy to snap that picture and ask "How's this look?"

Alot of things have to be taken into consideration. I can tell you just didn't start throwing rocks in there. The plants will accent and soften the rocks in time.

I would like to see this scape in 2 years from now. I'll say it will look awesome.



Good job....................................................A


I would hire you in a minute for any project based on what I see and your comments.

Great! When do I start?!?!:D :D

Thanks for the input.

You're right -- there are a lot of considerations in the big picture. I know I've been guilty of this as well -- someone posts some pics of job and asks for input. Well, often, we all base our judgements on how we would have done the job with no budgetary constraints, and a customer that puts complete faith in you with zero input. Unfortunately 99% or more of our customers are constrained by a budget, and ALL customers want some kind of involvement in their landscape decisions. Wouldn't we do all of over installs different if the choices were completely our's?

I replied to a recent post of another landscape job that I thought wasn't very appealling. Very nice house, but lots of straight lines, and so-so (in my opinion) plant choices. Well, after more input from original poster, customer WANTED straight lines, landscaper had to deal with HOA restrictions, and several perennials were installed that were immature. So, based on the additional info, I now say sgallaher (I think) achieved what the customer was looking for.

A lot of guys also mentioned they would have installed more plants. I had forgotten to mention that the customer had some houses painted up that will displayed in the landscape. So, we had to leave some room for this display. Personally, I hate the idea, but the decisions aren't all mine.:( Some of these houses can be seen in the background in some of the pics.

I still contend that once the shrubs and perennials mature, the rocks will seem less invasive. That said, I also appreciate the constructive criticism that I WILL consider during future installs.

Artistic Blooms
05-25-2004, 10:07 PM
Somone after my own heart!!!! It looks great. I always use rocks in my landscapes, you did a GREAT JOB.

D Felix
05-26-2004, 01:20 AM
Mark-
Not to change the subject, but how many hours were on that 331? If you don't mind my asking (if you do, say so, you won't hurt my feelings), what was asking price when you bought it?

We're begining to talk about possibly purchasing one in the next few years, and late last week found out what a new 334 with cab, heat, A/C and thumb would run.... ~$900/month for 5 years! Ouch!!!

Back on subject, I agree with o-so-n-so, I too would like to see pics of it in about 2 years!

And I do agree with you on comments made based on "perfect" world situations. I know I'm guilty of it and have to constantly keep that in the back of my mind when I do comment on things. Of course, the really opinionated comments I made about the curbing had nothing to do with perfect world for the most part. Most of it was flat (what should be) common sense..........:)


Dan

GreenMonster
05-26-2004, 08:11 AM
Originally posted by D Felix
Mark-
Not to change the subject, but how many hours were on that 331? If you don't mind my asking (if you do, say so, you won't hurt my feelings), what was asking price when you bought it?

We're begining to talk about possibly purchasing one in the next few years, and late last week found out what a new 334 with cab, heat, A/C and thumb would run.... ~$900/month for 5 years! Ouch!!!

Back on subject, I agree with o-so-n-so, I too would like to see pics of it in about 2 years!

And I do agree with you on comments made based on "perfect" world situations. I know I'm guilty of it and have to constantly keep that in the back of my mind when I do comment on things. Of course, the really opinionated comments I made about the curbing had nothing to do with perfect world for the most part. Most of it was flat (what should be) common sense..........:)


Dan

I don't mind at all Dan -- check your pm. $900/month I ain't paying that, but I ain't new either -- no a/c or heat either.

Attached is a photo that the customer sent me. All of her new houses are installed in the landscape now. :o

Regarding the curbing, yeah, even landscaping on the tightest budget should allow for a better design than that. But, some of my earliest stuff (entry to my own house eight years ago) makes me gag every time I come down the walkway.:rolleyes: One of these days I'll fix that -- hopefully by putting up an attached garage!

The "perfect" world. It's not out there too often, but it's nice once in a while. On a side note, this customer had some work scheduled at their house, but cancelled, and decided to do more at the antique shop instead, based on the success of this project.:)

ProLandscapes
05-26-2004, 02:41 PM
If you don't mind disclosing your price what did that job set the customer back?

Thanks,
Josh

GrassFearsMe
05-26-2004, 11:28 PM
a little too much rock 4 me other than that looks good.

GreenMonster
05-27-2004, 06:01 AM
Originally posted by ProLandscapes
If you don't mind disclosing your price what did that job set the customer back?

Thanks,
Josh

Let's hear a few guesses, then I'll tell.

LB Landscaping
05-27-2004, 07:28 AM
Looks awsome GM, nice job!!!! How's things going?????

TurfTimeTim
05-27-2004, 01:12 PM
Looks good. As soon as your plantings mature it should tie things together and soften the look of the boulders. Nice work !
(westcoastopinion)

qualitylandscaping
05-28-2004, 12:33 AM
looks good! I like the rocks..

I'll take a stab at the cost.. Not knowing much about it, I will say approx $8,000-11,000 including all materials and labor..

GreenMonster
05-28-2004, 01:54 PM
Originally posted by TurfTimeTim
Looks good. As soon as your plantings mature it should tie things together and soften the look of the boulders. Nice work !
(westcoastopinion)

Thanks Tim. I agree:D

GreenMonster
05-28-2004, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by qualitylandscaping
looks good! I like the rocks..

I'll take a stab at the cost.. Not knowing much about it, I will say approx $8,000-11,000 including all materials and labor..


Nope. You're the only guess so far, so no clues yet.

Any more takers?

GreenMonster
05-28-2004, 01:56 PM
Originally posted by LB Landscaping
Looks awsome GM, nice job!!!! How's things going?????

Thanks LB. Things are going well -- very busy. No time to even do quotes. Rain ain't helping.

Get my aeravator next week!

ProLandscapes
05-28-2004, 02:00 PM
I will take a stab at the cost. In my area I would bid about $7,000 for that but on the east coast I would say $9500. Let me know if I am close as I am bidding a job like that right now and would like to have a ball park.

Thanks,
Josh

GreenMonster
05-28-2004, 02:09 PM
Originally posted by ProLandscapes
I will take a stab at the cost. In my area I would bid about $7,000 for that but on the east coast I would say $9500. Let me know if I am close as I am bidding a job like that right now and would like to have a ball park.

Thanks,
Josh

Sorry Josh, I wouldn't have gotten the job at that price.:o

Here's a bit of a hint. After expenses, I made about $60/hr. I used one helper for most of the job.

Another hint, based on your guesses, I'll bid the next one higher!

o-so-n-so
05-28-2004, 08:24 PM
$3892.53------------------------------

GreenMonster
05-28-2004, 08:28 PM
Originally posted by o-so-n-so
$3892.53------------------------------


ding ding ding.

You're a couple hundred bucks low, so n so.

I wish I could get the kind of money you other guys were talking about!

This particular customer is over $8k this year, with more coming, so I'm trying to be good to them too.

qualitylandscaping
05-28-2004, 10:32 PM
so it was $4,000-4,500? I would be there just for labor.. Moving all of those boulders doesn't look like much fun.. I guess it also depends how much you paid for the rock..

GreenMonster
05-29-2004, 08:15 PM
Originally posted by qualitylandscaping
so it was $4,000-4,500? I would be there just for labor.. Moving all of those boulders doesn't look like much fun.. I guess it also depends how much you paid for the rock..

I paid $0 for the rock. Only charged for the manhours to collect & deliver.

Not much fun?!?! You get to play with the big toys! Doesn't get much more fun than that.

wonderwoman
05-30-2004, 02:15 AM
looks good less rocks

wonderwoman
05-30-2004, 02:23 AM
hows about 12,ooo

jwholden
12-19-2004, 02:34 PM
So I'm up in Tamworth with the wife on vacation and find an add for something called the Wright Museum. Beeing a WWII buff I figure why not check it out. As we come around the bend I get some serious dejavoo, I feel as if I know this landscape even though I've never been down that road before.

You did a great job giving your client exactly what they needed and it is definitely an eye catcher with the 'ornaments'.

What's the deal with closing the museum for three months??? That just aint right!

impactlandscaping
12-19-2004, 05:25 PM
Mark, do you have a mid / late summer pic of this job? I'd like to see all the seasonal colors. Great work as always :D

GreenMonster
12-19-2004, 06:30 PM
So I'm up in Tamworth with the wife on vacation and find an add for something called the Wright Museum. Beeing a WWII buff I figure why not check it out. As we come around the bend I get some serious dejavoo, I feel as if I know this landscape even though I've never been down that road before.

You did a great job giving your client exactly what they needed and it is definitely an eye catcher with the 'ornaments'.

What's the deal with closing the museum for three months??? That just aint right!

I didn't know they closed that -- Wolfeboro is very much a seasonal town. Things get real quiet in the winter.

Thanks for the compliment. We, well actually the owner of the antique shop won the Wolfeboro Chamber's annual "Beutification Award" for the landscape improvements. JW, if you saw this landscape, you probably saw our wall up the street too! :D

What do you guys think about a direct mailing to all chamber members? Something like this:

Congratulation to the American Home Gallery -- 2004 Beautification Award recipient.

Could this be you next year?

Followed with all the standard verbage of what we offer...

Thoughts?

Impact -- No. I never did snap any pictures later in the year, shame on me. We were there every week too, as we picked them up as a maintenance customer. Definately next year so I can update my portfolio.

GreenMonster
07-23-2005, 01:50 PM
Mark, do you have a mid / late summer pic of this job? I'd like to see all the seasonal colors. Great work as always :D


Here's some mid-summer pics with addition of annuals this year.

GreenMonster
07-23-2005, 01:53 PM
So I'm up in Tamworth with the wife on vacation and find an add for something called the Wright Museum. Beeing a WWII buff I figure why not check it out. As we come around the bend I get some serious dejavoo, I feel as if I know this landscape even though I've never been down that road before.

You did a great job giving your client exactly what they needed and it is definitely an eye catcher with the 'ornaments'.

What's the deal with closing the museum for three months??? That just aint right!

jw,

I just did a lawn reno for a guy who works at the Wright Museum. Nice ol' fella. He served in WWII

GreenMonster
07-23-2005, 01:56 PM
One more for S&G

sheshovel
07-23-2005, 02:58 PM
The reason everybody was saying too many rocks is the placement.the stringing out of lines of rocks worked for nature but did not work for you.
You started out GREAT on the top row of lg rocks but then lost your line of perception and made it too busy
starting when you began to circle and line up your rocks and not digging them in in groupings and in relation to each other and the native rock.
like the point on the corner,out of place and unnatural looking in relation to the hill.NOW having said that,it dosent really matter that some of it looks unnatural cuz those little houses screwed up your natural theme anyway!All plants look better in groupings of 3,6or,9.of the same type and repeated throughout to give uniformity.Here though you did just fine and I'd give you a C on the rock grade and a B- on the planting grade.Looks good for a limited budget and your talent at the time.
There is this great book on rock placement and grouping and setting rocks in the landscape I got on Amazon.com title
"Natural Stonescapes"by
Dub'e APLD and Campbell
"The art and craft of stone placement".Exellent book
I would reccomend it to anybody interested in installing these types of landscapes

foggyjr5
07-23-2005, 06:39 PM
I think that it looks very nice! It definitly looks a lot better.

Nice Work!!

GreenMonster
07-23-2005, 09:24 PM
The reason everybody was saying too many rocks is the placement.the stringing out of lines of rocks worked for nature but did not work for you.
You started out GREAT on the top row of lg rocks but then lost your line of perception and made it too busy
starting when you began to circle and line up your rocks and not digging them in in groupings and in relation to each other and the native rock.
like the point on the corner,out of place and unnatural looking in relation to the hill.NOW having said that,it dosent really matter that some of it looks unnatural cuz those little houses screwed up your natural theme anyway!All plants look better in groupings of 3,6or,9.of the same type and repeated throughout to give uniformity.Here though you did just fine and I'd give you a C on the rock grade and a B- on the planting grade.Looks good for a limited budget and your talent at the time.
There is this great book on rock placement and grouping and setting rocks in the landscape I got on Amazon.com title
"Natural Stonescapes"by
Dub'e APLD and Campbell
"The art and craft of stone placement".Exellent book
I would reccomend it to anybody interested in installing these types of landscapes

I might check that book out. Thanks.

I'll give you a B+ on your assesment :D I agree with much of what you've said. I did lose my vision a little on the bottom, trying to create planting pockets, but the point on the corner was done by someone else the year before. When asked if I could take it out, she didn't want to "undo" work she had paid for the year before. Planting wise, I think I'd do it a lot differently if I had to do it again today.

BTW, she bought the topiaries, I just put em in :(

N.H.BOY
07-24-2005, 10:33 AM
Mark---- Looks good over a year. I like it. It's funny that some guys have to "pay" for rocks huh? Up here in good 'ol N.H. they grow like weeds. Free rock is the best kind :D Keep up the good work keeping N.H. a great looking state.