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tiedeman
05-30-2004, 04:32 PM
I have been reading up on this posts for some time now and it's very interesting. My biggest concern that I have noticed is hassle and price comparison of organics compared to regular commerical pesticides.

So honest answers now, what is the price comparison for treating broadleaf and crabgrass lawn of lets say 15,000 with an organic to compared to a non-organic?

bioman
05-30-2004, 07:51 PM
First of all organics is not based on just one product. Everything we use to some point is a weed preventive. In order to compare prices of just weed control, I need to know what percentage of the 15,000 sqft is inadative with crabgrass or broadleaf. Our cost for a complete organic program is between $85.00 - $100.00 per 6,000 sqft. per year.

Thanks,

Ron

tiedeman
05-30-2004, 08:26 PM
Ok, a couple more questions

Why would the percentage of the lawn infested with weeds have to do anything with the applications? Sure more applications might be needed, but how would that really affect just one single application. Very little at all I would feel. So I am just talking about one single application price comparison right now

Also if the price is that per year, how many applications do you do on an average? I do know that this is where the percentage of weeds in the lawns has a meaning, but again on average how many?

Thanks, just curious, trying to learn more about these methods

bioman
05-30-2004, 09:36 PM
You really do not know why the percentage of infestation of the yard has to do with applications? No, not more applications. If over 30% of the yard is inidative with any kind of weed, I would rip the turf out and replace it. Why, because It does not matter if you use organic or resticited use herbicide. You will never gain control of the problem.
There are six applications in our program. The percentage of weeds has no bearing on # of applications. However, location does.

Thanks,

Ron

tiedeman
05-30-2004, 10:29 PM
Originally posted by bioman
You really do not know why the percentage of infestation of the yard has to do with applications? No, not more applications. If over 30% of the yard is inidative with any kind of weed, I would rip the turf out and replace it.


what do think I am, an idiot? And yes, with a higher percentage of pests in the lawn, sometimes more applications are needed.

TurfProSTL
05-31-2004, 07:18 AM
It does not matter if you use organic or resticited use herbicide. You will never gain control of the problem.
:rolleyes: Never? :confused:

Randy J
05-31-2004, 09:36 AM
What kind of results would you be looking for? Most organic herbicides are not extremely effective quickly - and by that I mean it make take a full season or longer to gain control with organics. An exception being orange oil/vinager mixture. That acts much like roundup though, and has to be spot applied.

The whole idea behind organics as I understand it, is to build a healthier turf stand that better resists weeds. That means using compost to help the soil and fertilizer to help the grass, so that the grass will choke out the weeds, more so than using herbicide. You might be better off, if there's a significant amount of weeds in the turf stand, to use a traditional non-organic herbicide to get rid of the weeds. And then switch to organics to build the turf back and control the weeds.

I am by no means an expert on organics, but that's my understanding.

heritage
05-31-2004, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by bioman
You really do not know why the percentage of infestation of the yard has to do with applications? No, not more applications. If over 30% of the yard is inidative with any kind of weed, I would rip the turf out and replace it. Why, because It does not matter if you use organic or resticited use herbicide. You will never gain control of the problem.
There are six applications in our program. The percentage of weeds has no bearing on # of applications. However, location does.

Thanks,

Ron

How about creating a sustainable enviornment for the turf so it's harder for weeds to even have a chance? Here in new jersey we raise mowing height to 3.5-4" and it really makes it hard for the weeds.......the grass takes over. If areas need help you could seed with a grass type that would thrive in a given situation. I know this has worked for me on cool season turf. Does warm season turf have a harder time out compeating with the weeds when cultural methods are applied for the advantage of turf over weeds????

Pete D.