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Sooners
07-15-2004, 03:53 AM
I had a customer ask us to spray vinegar on her brick sidewalk instead of Round-Up. We did in May and it killed everything. Weeds did eventually come back, but they always come back after using Round-up too. Just curious if anyone's ever heard of using vinegar.

grasswhacker
07-15-2004, 06:46 AM
I read it somewhere in the "Organic lawn application" forum. Did you dilute it or use it straight? Was it white vinegar or apple cider vinegar?

Mickhippy
07-15-2004, 08:15 AM
I have also been told that if you add a little to the round up and water, it changes the ph level of the water to make the round work more efficiently. I should mention, that was rain water from the roof!

Norm Al
07-15-2004, 09:10 AM
vinegar is pretty close to what roundup is!


actuqally more like vinegar, salt, soap and water.......they make 5 billion a year off of the stuff!

txlawnking
07-15-2004, 09:37 AM
Like grasswhacker said, What kind of vinegar, and do you just apply it straight??

SouthernFried
07-15-2004, 09:44 AM
Vinegar kills on contact and burns the weed from the outside.

Glyphosphate, which is the killing ingredient in Round-up...is a systemic. The plant absorbs it internally and it kills the total weed.

Roundup will kill the weed better and more thoroughly than Vinegar will...but, it will take longer.

Still, with the "organic" craze going on these days...vinegar is still a good option, you'll just have to use it more frequently. I have used it one part Vinegar, one part Water...I'm sure you can make it stronger...or weaker and still get results.

Straight vinegar does just fine...never tried the "cider" vinegars.

Sooners
07-15-2004, 07:56 PM
Originally posted by grasswhacker
I read it somewhere in the "Organic lawn application" forum. Did you dilute it or use it straight? Was it white vinegar or apple cider vinegar?

I used white vinegar straight out of the bottle and into my sprayer. I only tried this once. I am curious if it will hurt shrubs if it gets oversprayed?

cenlo
07-16-2004, 11:46 PM
Still, with the "organic" craze going on these days...vinegar is still a good option

I have been spraying 20% concentrate vin. and the results have been terrible! It burns out the tops and within a week or two they are all back.(..........and I do mean all). At first it seems great but then the reality hits. Maybe a salt stick would be a better option or the infra-weeder?

DUSTYCEDAR
07-17-2004, 12:05 AM
u dont want to salt the earth
but salt water works but not that great

rredogg
07-18-2004, 02:25 PM
I've been have better sucess with scaulding hot water. Just make sure to pour enough to get down to the roots.

Dchall_San_Antonio
08-02-2004, 05:22 PM
If you'll check out FAQ #2 in this list you'll see a little blurb about using vinegar as an herbicide.

Catmann
08-05-2004, 05:32 PM
A product called BurnOut is made from Vinegar and Lemon juice extracts and works very well. Available in retail RTU and commercial concentrate sizes. It is available lots of places.

Five Diamond Lawns
08-22-2004, 12:13 PM
I have a client who took the vinegar as an organic weed killer to heart and for 2 months her backyard has smelled like Easter Eggs. It's sickening!!!!! How do you combat the smell???:(

cenlo
08-24-2004, 01:15 AM
Originally posted by DUSTYCEDAR
u dont want to salt the earth
but salt water works but not that great

What's the problem with a little salt to dehydrate the weed and root system?

Keegan
08-25-2004, 12:39 PM
I've been using vinegar for a few years with very good success. The hotter and sunnier it is when you apply it the faster and better it works. Also, you can mix it with about one part of liquid dish soap. This helps it to stay on the leaves longer and burn it quicker.

colene
10-06-2006, 12:14 AM
I have used vinegar numerous times...it works. I did find I have to use a lot of it...so I usually us my 2 gal. plastic watering can instead of a spray bottle.

YardPro
10-09-2006, 08:54 PM
vinegar is merely acetic acit.

you can use dilute hydrochloric acid, etc... does the same thing

cenlo... salt is much worse than vinegar...
salt will stay in the soils for quite a while and will affect soil pH,etc... elevated salt levels in soild can cuase large problems in soils

here's a side that NOBODY considers about salt, vinegar, etc.....
both of these can easially kill soil microbes. Roundup is non toxic to soil microbes... they actually consume the glyphosate.

salt is terrible for soil microbial activity.

colene
10-09-2006, 10:28 PM
Thanks for the info.........I would never use salt for weeds...though I have used it on tree stumps. I've drilled holes in the stump and pour in the salt...

Colene :)

upidstay
10-28-2006, 09:19 AM
I've used vinegar, pelargonic acid (Scythe), and a citrus based burn down. They all function the same way, and the weeds typuically come back. The vinegar I used was not food grade, which I believe is a 5% solution, it was 15%. The smell is a big problem. Vinegar stinks like, well, vinegar. Scythe just reeks, and the citrus basse had an orange smell which lingered. The label makes me nervous. I used to have to wear a full leather chem apron, full length rubber gloves and a face shield with respirator when mixing the citrus based acid. To protect me from being horribly disfigured in the case of an accident. Splash a little round up in your eye and it will be pink for a few days. Splash a little of the strong acids in your eye and you'll be blinded. A kid who worked under me had a seal on a backpack sprayer go while wearing a BP full of that citrus acid. His skin was red and peeling from butt to knees, and his pants literally fell apart. His worklers comp attorney had a field day with that one.

HydroCutter
10-28-2006, 09:59 AM
do you know if you need a pesticide license to apply BurnOut. I'm in NJ

MowerMoney
10-28-2006, 10:06 AM
I have used a 1 part salt and 3 parts vinegar, both table grade, with fairly good success. Problem is, it's a pain to disolve the salt in the vinegar and the salt residues clog up the sprayer tips. I only used it on driveways and sidewalk brickwork so microbial activity was not an issue. Round Up is simpler and easier.

Don't be fooled into thinking that this is all organic so a pesticide licence is not required. I believe that it is still considered a pesticide as that is what it's usage is.

colene
10-28-2006, 09:52 PM
I used a 2 1/2 gal watering can when I use vinegar...I don't use a spray unit.

also...............

When can 'real' plants be planted after weed killer is applied..whether vinegar or any other method...

Thanks for your answers..

Colene

cenlo
10-28-2006, 10:33 PM
I used a 2 1/2 gal watering can when I use vinegar...I don't use a spray unit.

also...............

When can 'real' plants be planted after weed killer is applied..whether vinegar or any other method...

Thanks for your answers..

Colene

Depends on the type of weed killer or pesticide!

YardPro
10-29-2006, 06:05 PM
if vinegar is used, it will dissociate pretty quickly.

HydroCutter
10-29-2006, 08:52 PM
Am I safe to assume I don't need a pesticide license to spray vinegar?

YardPro
10-30-2006, 07:50 AM
you do not need a liscense if you apply to YOUR yard...

you still need a liscense to apply on others property...

anything that is used as an herbicide (salt, vinegat, etc....) needs a liscense if being applied for someone else.

LawnVet
11-06-2006, 06:58 PM
mm and yp are right. if you apply anything to a lawn other than your own you need an applicator's liscense...that includes those squirrely folks that use urine as a weedkiller. ya'll can laugh but i've heard of it being done for the intent and purpose of killing weeds. i suppose it might work - i just hope they squeeze their lemons at home

VictorB
12-30-2006, 12:56 PM
Just a little note about a license when applying vinegar and other organic materials; where I live in Windsor, Ontario they have given exemptions to applying specific products like vinegar. If you buy this product and it is NOT registered as a pesticide/herbicide then you do not need a license, if on the other hand you do buy a product that is acetic acid and sold under a brand name, they have to have a registration number and you do need a license.

A co-op may sell vinegar at 20% acetic acid. Most cases this isn't registered.

It is always best to contact your local government to get a complete understanding of the law.

upidstay
01-03-2007, 12:44 PM
As far as licensing goes, every state will be different. Here in Connecticut, if it has an EPA reg. #, you need a license to apply it for pay. If it doesn't have this #, you don't need a license. But I know other states are different, so check with the appropriate authority in your area before the fines roll in.

dualsmows
01-21-2007, 10:21 AM
I have never heard of this but it sounds interesting.

mikecaldwell1204
01-21-2007, 03:55 PM
learn something new everyday

boats47
02-02-2007, 01:06 PM
Not that everyone does not know already, but if you apply vinegar as an herbicide you have to have an applicators liscence. Remember it is not labeled for intended use as a herbicide. This is according to RI's Department of Enviromental Management.

Daner
02-21-2007, 06:44 PM
Not that everyone does not know already, but if you apply vinegar as an herbicide you have to have an applicators liscence. Remember it is not labeled for intended use as a herbicide. This is according to RI's Department of Enviromental Management.

I think this depends where you are...what state etc...as far as I know its ok to use Vinegar Here In Canada:canadaflag: If its not Labeled as a Herbicide.
The same goes for fertilizers...corect me if i'm wrong...My muscle are getting big now:weightlifter:

salandscape
02-27-2007, 05:33 PM
Try using 1 gallon white vinegar, 8oz table salt, 8 oz dish soap.

This will kill the whole weed if enough is applied applied. The soap acts like a surfactant so the plant will absorb it more readliy. This will work better than just vinegar. I use it on patios/ walkways and even when I 'm doing a lawn renovation, just do it about a week ahead of time and the salt should be flushed out of the soil.