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BryPaulD
07-27-2004, 10:49 PM
I put ferromaec ac on my lawn a week ago. I think I may have over diluted it with water, not sure. I think I noticed a difference in color in the lawn, but eeeh,,,, hardly. I kind of wanted to put some down this week, but I'm not sure if I should?? Would it hurt it or help it? Thank you :) I water daily, and there is fertilizer down, scott's summer.

Ric
07-27-2004, 10:59 PM
Originally posted by BryPaulD
I put ferromaec ac on my lawn a week ago. I think I may have over diluted it with water, not sure. I think I noticed a difference in color in the lawn, but eeeh,,,, hardly. I kind of wanted to put some down this week, but I'm not sure if I should?? Would it hurt it or help it? Thank you :) I water daily, and there is fertilizer down, scott's summer.

Brypaul

The form of iron and the salt content of your yard as well pH can cause Iron to give unfavorable response, However in general it would take an awful lot of iron to do real harm. What that amount is depends on your soil. Why not try Ironite, it will give you a dark green and has a nice residual. It is a granule so it is easy to apply.

BryPaulD
07-27-2004, 11:47 PM
thanks Ric. I will keep an eye out for this ironite. BTW my lawn is kentucky blue grass. Don't know if that matters?? I should post a pic of my lawn for opinion's sake?? This spring when the snow melted I put a lot of of lime down, then a month later I aerated and seeded. Then started with miracle grow apps. once every two weeks. Then ferromeced. Then aerated and scott's summer fertilizer granules. And water daily. But still my lawn looks pretty much the same as the neighbor across the streets, who I think just water's daily..... maybe fertilizer granules., but my lawn should just outstand his?? I'm working too hard here, lol :)

way to grow
07-28-2004, 03:13 AM
Deep infrequent waterings are best. You want your roots to grow deep into the soil. If you water daily without letting the soil dry out a bit you'll get a really shallow root system and crappy lawn. Try 3 times a week @ about 45 min per section. Time also depends on sprinkler output, soil type etc. Am I right on this?

Ric
07-28-2004, 08:05 AM
Originally posted by way to grow
Deep infrequent waterings are best. You want your roots to grow deep into the soil. If you water daily without letting the soil dry out a bit you'll get a really shallow root system and crappy lawn. Try 3 times a week @ about 45 min per section. Time also depends on sprinkler output, soil type etc. Am I right on this?


Way To Go, Way to Grow :D

Yes watering to often or Too Much is worst than not enough. But Homeowner who want the Jones Lawns and the rest of the neighborhood to keep up will never be convinced of that. Once over watering is stopped there is a serious decline in the turf due to no root structure. They also are always putting fertilizer on these lawns that is being washed it out with excessive watering.

Best advise I can give is to watch your turf for dry spots before irrigating. Then water deeply. On our sandy soils every 5 days is perfect.

Grassmechanic
07-28-2004, 10:02 AM
Originally posted by BryPaulD
This spring when the snow melted I put a lot of of lime down, ....and this may be the problem. I don't know which part of MI you are in, but in the S.E. part , you'd be hardpressed to find a lawn that needs lime. This past spring, the lowest ph on lawns that I tested was 7.8, the highest 8.5! Take a soil sample and get it tested BEFORE adding lime to any soil. High Ph (as well as too low) will affect the plants ability to take up nutrients. KBG likes a ph in the 6.5 range (slightly acidic).

timturf
07-28-2004, 10:17 AM
YES, GET A SOIL TEST before liming!!!!!!!!!!1

Will also tell you if you need to add any nutrients!!!

Don't to forget to include a sodium test

BryPaulD
07-28-2004, 02:41 PM
here is my lawn, well 1/2 of it anyways.l

BryPaulD
07-28-2004, 02:43 PM
Here is another one. I noticed today, some mossy type of stuff in the little dirt patches throughout. ???

Grassmechanic
07-28-2004, 02:53 PM
Originally posted by BryPaulD
Here is another one. I noticed today, some mossy type of stuff in the little dirt patches throughout. ??? Yes, that moss is a "benefit" from overwatering your lawn.

BryPaulD
07-28-2004, 03:08 PM
*reduces watering*

Chris Wagner
07-28-2004, 03:16 PM
If that section with the moss sees a lot of shade combined with rigorous watering, it will dry out even slower... leading to moss.

That's a small spot... I'd remove the section, combine some peat and topsoil and fit a piece of sod in there.

Also, judging by the pic with the moss, looks like there are several grass types at play there. What type of seed did you overseed with?

I wouldn't worry too much during the summer months... just keep deep, infrequent waterings.

We'll help you in the fall time.

Meantime, get a soil test done... specifically on trouble areas.

TClawn
07-28-2004, 05:07 PM
Originally posted by Ric
Way To Go, Way to Grow :D

Yes watering to often or Too Much is worst than not enough. But Homeowner who want the Jones Lawns and the rest of the neighborhood to keep up will never be convinced of that. Once over watering is stopped there is a serious decline in the turf due to no root structure. They also are always putting fertilizer on these lawns that is being washed it out with excessive watering.

Best advise I can give is to watch your turf for dry spots before irrigating. Then water deeply. On our sandy soils every 5 days is perfect.

will the same watering technique work on clay soils?

grassguy_
07-29-2004, 12:11 AM
A benefit from overwatering at times, or poor soil drainage, possibly too high a phosphorus level,.... etc. Best to get a full soil analysis done, so you know exactly where you are with both NPK and micronutrients.

Runner
08-01-2004, 03:39 PM
Chris,
Yes, the same will work on clay soils, but you have to WATCH for runoff. Once this is happening, no more watering for that particlar area should be done, as it is wasted. Aerating for drainage can also add benefit to this, as the water is then more easily absorbed.

EJK2352
08-02-2004, 12:06 AM
You can over Iron a lawn. Too much Iron will cause the turf to turn black in color.

ThreeWide
08-02-2004, 02:03 PM
The permiability rate of clay here in Georgia is about 0.2 inches per hour. Anything over that rate is generally runoff.

In a perfect world, we could deliver 1 inch of water once every seven days. Since clay is subject to runoff, we have to split the watering sessions up. Can't deliver it all in one period.