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Outdoor Services
08-06-2004, 08:36 AM
I'm going to be putting in a system using the water out of the canal in the back yard. Should I be concerned about dirty water?? I've notice 98% of the neighbors, (fairly newer homes) have impacts instead of rotors to cover the open areas. What are your thoughts?
I'd was thinking of using Rain Bird 5000 Series, or Hunter PGP rotors. What are your thaughts?
Is there a wiring diagram out there for installing the timer,pump,and switch/relay pump system?
Any help and thoughts are very welcome!:)
Thank you!!!!!!!!:) :)

DGI
08-06-2004, 07:50 PM
How dirty are we talking? A 5000 will pass fine particles along without problems, something you should be able to achieve with a good filter setup.

How large is the canal and how fast does it move?

Outdoor Services
08-07-2004, 11:14 AM
The water is cloudy enough where you cant see the bottom, like most muddy bottom rivers/canals here in lower Michigan.
The water is 4-5 feet deep now, and it's going to be dredged this fall too for more depth. This canal was engineered well, it has good circulation so it doesn't't get green slime. It gets fresh water from springs, plus It is only a 1/4 mile in from Lake St Clair.
I was thinking of using a Wayne 1.5 horse pump and a well point in the canal for filtration.

DGI
08-07-2004, 09:20 PM
Unless your goal is to not have to worry about a clogged filter, I'd stay far away from a well point. Not nearly enough filtration.

Rig up a 40 gallon bigfoot filter with clean, fine pea gravel away from the bank and bottom. Something that can be adjusted might be in your best interests.

Outdoor Services
08-08-2004, 11:59 AM
What the heck is a bigfoot filter????:o

DGI
08-08-2004, 06:07 PM
http://www.bigfootmfg.com/filter.html

Oldtimer
08-08-2004, 10:44 PM
Use a 1.5hp submersible pump. Trench into the lake at a 45 degree angle and try to set the pump in at least 4 feet of water. Turn the well casing up 90 degrees for 3 to 4 feet, drill 3/8" holes in it (lots of holes) and wrap with plastic window screen material. Use stainless hose clamps to hold the mesh and be sure to cap the pipe. This will give 25gpm with the pressure to run any heads you want to use.

Oldtimer

Outdoor Services
08-10-2004, 11:37 AM
For staters this is an upper end neighborhood, with seven foot high steel sea walls. There are many 40' crusers going up and down this canal.
There is no room for barrel filled pea garavel filter, and/or submercialbe pumps. Let alone access to the water over the darn sea wall in the fall to pull all that crap out so the ice doesn't take in out to the lake.
So, back to the point - will cloudy water clog up valves, and rotors.
It's cloudy due to very fine partical of brown silt on the bottom being mixed up by boat traffic.
If rottors can become cloged am I better to use impacts??

Rotor-Man
08-10-2004, 01:40 PM
Just completed repair job of replacing a pump, pumping out of a lake and converted to city water use. If you don't know how to wire a pump and pump start, hire an electrican so that it will be done correctly. Doesn't matter what brand or type of head you use, it will invaribly become clogged with silt, sand,weeds,etc. It doesn't matter to me if it's a HIGH end neighborhood or a blue-collar neighborhood where I'm doing a job, do it the right way or not at all!

Grassmechanic
08-10-2004, 04:48 PM
Outdoor - Go to John Deere Landscapes, they will have the correct style of filter that will allow you to use canal water. Almost every account that I service has an irrigation system that draws from a lake, canal, or river. My experience is that impacts are better than geardrives for non-potable water. Geardives wear out as quickly as a few seasons from the solid particles in the water. Also, some valves work better than others with non-potable water. The best valve I've found is the brass Rainbird EFB-CP valve. I have some of these in service for close to 20 years without ever having a problem with them. The drawback is that they are very expensive.

Outdoor Services
08-10-2004, 11:42 PM
Grass Mechanic ( Mike) Thank you for all your help!!
I thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences that where geared toward my questions. You have been more than helpful!!
You have been most professional ...

Thank you again,
Mike:

Outdoor Services
08-10-2004, 11:51 PM
Originally posted by Rotor-Man
Just completed repair job of replacing a pump, pumping out of a lake and converted to city water use. If you don't know how to wire a pump and pump start, hire an electrican so that it will be done correctly. Doesn't matter what brand or type of head you use, it will invaribly become clogged with silt, sand,weeds,etc. It doesn't matter to me if it's a HIGH end neighborhood or a blue-collar neighborhood where I'm doing a job, do it the right way or not at all!

Only one way to learn, is ask questions?? RIGHT!
That is why this site was made, to help people.
If you know these apects of wiring why not share the knowledege? If your not willing to HELP, why bother being a member of the site:confused:

DGI
08-11-2004, 07:13 AM
In similar setups I have run galvanized down the side and let it dangle right off. Easy to lift out.

This canal doesn't sound as bad as I thought, especially considering you have a wall to work up against. If you're set on a well point, then impacts are for you, and forget about running mist heads if it is going to pass enough debris to make you decide impact over geared.

Rotor-Man
08-11-2004, 07:18 AM
Good to learn, I will agree, but also some things that should be left to the experts, such as electrical wiring of a pump [220 volts] and correct placement of the pump start relay. Also am confused on 40' cruisers being able to go up and down a canal that is only 4-5 feet deep? Lastly if we all can learn don't be to hasty in shooting down ideas that others have used and suggested to you, that have been used by them in the past with success! Also how are you planning on pumping the water out of the canal, and making it accessible for winterizing in the fall?

Oldtimer
08-12-2004, 08:07 PM
How can you access the water thru the sea wall? There are several ways to filter the water.

Oldtimer

Critical Care
08-14-2004, 04:28 PM
For whatever its worth... I've had a lot of problems with impact heads. Not so much due to water issues, but rather because of weak springs and/or pressure issues. Maybe it's just my luck, and understandably they handle dirty water better, but I've sure had my fill of them going south. If you go the impact route, just be careful in your design stage and to look at the different ones and their specs carefully. You surely don't want to stick five or six 5.0 gpm impacts on a single zone with only 20 gpm available.

Oh, and some valves work better with dirty water because when they close they perform a self flushing or cleaning routine.

Outdoor Services
08-17-2004, 11:56 PM
I just wanted to thank all of you for the help and input.
Thank you again!:cool2: