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JimLewis
08-10-2004, 06:51 PM
I am in need of a good fertilizer injection unit that can work well with a drip system for flowerbeds.

Anyone every use / install one of these? Do you recommend a specific brand or unit?

pokemon
08-11-2004, 06:39 PM
Hi Jim,

I think "The Fertigator system " may be solution you are looking for. The system has three parts a controller, an injector and the fertilizer. The controller reads the sprinkler system timer to determine what zone is on. Then the injector is instructed to deliver precise amounts of fertilizer to that zone. The fertilizer is drawn from its container which you can put anywhere for example in the valve box shed or garage

http://fertigator.com/

pokemon
08-11-2004, 06:39 PM
Hi Jim,

I think "The Fertigator system " may be solution you are looking for. The system has three parts a controller, an injector and the fertilizer. The controller reads the sprinkler system timer to determine what zone is on. Then the injector is instructed to deliver precise amounts of fertilizer to that zone. The fertilizer is drawn from its container which you can put anywhere for example in the valve box shed or garage

http://fertigator.com/

JimLewis
08-11-2004, 07:21 PM
I'll check it out. But from your description, it sounds much more than what I am looking for.

I saw one a while back at a local irrigation parts store that was real simple. It was made to be installed right on the line. You attached a pipe on the inlet, water mixed with fertilizer inside a canister, and then you continued your pipe at the outlet. Just lift the lid and add more fertilizer as needed.

The store doesn't sell that model anymore. But that's what I am looking for.

lbmd1
08-15-2004, 09:38 AM
Hey Jim,
maybe it was the EZ-Flo fertigation system you saw. http://www.ezfloinjection.com/ We are looking into marketing their product next season heavily.

Mike

SWD
08-15-2004, 09:57 AM
Jim, you will find that fertigation systems of any type will mess up drip systems very fast. The water in the irrigation system will have to be as close to neutral as possible with as little total disolved solids as possible for fertigation to work with small diameter tubing.
The problem goes back to the exchange sites on the water and the fact that fertilizer doesn't disolve in water it becomes a colloid. With this occurring, the adhesion aspects of the water droplet are changed making the colloidal solution in effect "stick" to the small diameter tubing.
One possible aspect to pursue would be to lightly irrigate prior to and after the fertigation cycle to try and flush the micro tubing.
Good luck with it.

hamsey
08-23-2004, 04:46 PM
I installed the fertigator in my system last year and never hooked up the fert. this year. Does not work! I will be looking into another system next year. Either the ezflo or techturf.

Norm

Shilohlandscaping
08-24-2004, 08:02 PM
I installed an ez-flo system in my neighbor's system a couple of months ago.. very simple to install and its the bomb! Its hooked up both to his drips and lawns, set at the lowest setting and everything looks great. Remember to check local regs when you install it though, I had to install a pressure reducing backflow preventer ($160.00) above ground and visible. (California) The place you buy it from should be in the know about your regs..

HayBay
08-25-2004, 07:50 AM
I agree with SWD.

From my experience with drip lines you will be getting Undissolved solids blocking your lines (like a salt buildup). I would use only straight water or Ph'd water and manually fertilize (not through the tubing). I know thats not what you want to hear but it will save you the heartache.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-27-2012, 07:37 PM
I know this is an older post but just curious as to how it is going with the EZ Flo? I just became a factory authorized installer and am already selling units to existing customers in the dead of winter. I think it is going to be a huge success! Wish it was spring so I could start digging holes!




I installed an ez-flo system in my neighbor's system a couple of months ago.. very simple to install and its the bomb! Its hooked up both to his drips and lawns, set at the lowest setting and everything looks great. Remember to check local regs when you install it though, I had to install a pressure reducing backflow preventer ($160.00) above ground and visible. (California) The place you buy it from should be in the know about your regs..

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-27-2012, 07:41 PM
I agree with SWD.

From my experience with drip lines you will be getting Undissolved solids blocking your lines (like a salt buildup). I would use only straight water or Ph'd water and manually fertilize (not through the tubing). I know thats not what you want to hear but it will save you the heartache.

I talked to some guys that have been installing this for years and they did have a problem when using water soluable fert. It was building up residue and wrecking diaphrams in valves. They said it took a few years but it did happen. When they switched to liquid it solved the problem. Everyone I have talked to loves Mega Green 2-2-2.

Wet_Boots
12-27-2012, 08:57 PM
What are your backflow regulations where you are working? If you don't have a state-wide set of rules, you may have some headaches doing fertilizer injection.

Mike Leary
12-27-2012, 09:08 PM
What are your backflow regulations where you are working? If you don't have a state-wide set of rules, you may have some headaches doing fertilizer injection.

Reduced-Pressure backflow assemblies are mandatory for injection. I had heard of a organic fertilizer than was somehow spun as to be able to be applied to drip without the clogging, but R.P.s would still be called-for. I like the idea of injection.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-27-2012, 09:08 PM
What are your backflow regulations where you are working? If you don't have a state-wide set of rules, you may have some headaches doing fertilizer injection.

Wisconsin actually calls it chemigation and an RPZ is mandatory

Wet_Boots
12-27-2012, 09:19 PM
Sounds good. We did have one fellow here working in a Wisconsin locale that was using backflow rules from some long ago dark age, and he would have had a bad time of it with the fertilizing.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-27-2012, 09:44 PM
Sounds good. We did have one fellow here working in a Wisconsin locale that was using backflow rules from some long ago dark age, and he would have had a bad time of it with the fertilizing.

I believe in doing right the first time and always by the book. I am also getting certified and licensed for pest control. I will be using a product called EZ Flo Insect Control so I have to get certified in Landscape and Turf as well as Aquatic and Mosquito. It is all organic but state regs say I must so I am.

Wisconsin has a program becuse I am a Marine vet that they will waive the license fee the first year. 25 years later serving my country is still paying off. Ooh-Rah!!!!

Wet_Boots
12-27-2012, 10:37 PM
Semper Fi, dude. :)

GreenI.A.
12-28-2012, 01:46 AM
I have an EZ Flo main line system, I have had it for 5+ years, I use it for all of my planting beds (sprays) and planting boxes (micro). I had it set up with spray heads on my front lawn, but with the odd shape it is nearly imposible to get an even spray over the lawn and it always ended up getting stripped. I constantly found that I had to clean the strainers at the spray heads every few weeks. What I did was use two zone valves for each zone. Basically there are two seperate manafolds. One is fed from the the injector, the other manifold is fed from the water source. My beeds are 8 zones. After the 8 zones being fed by the injector run through their program, zones 9-16 run briefly with straight water to flush the lines and strainers. So basically zone 1 is fed by valve 1 & 9, zone 2 is fed by valves 2 & 10, etc.... Since I implemented the second manifold I do not see as much of a problem, the strainers last about the same as amount of time between cleanings as the non-injected zones.

GreenI.A.
12-28-2012, 01:50 AM
another benefit to what I just said above is the ease of changing irrigation times without having to adjust the injection dial. Normally if you increased your mater times, then you would have to decrease the injection so that you will not over feed the plants. By running with two manifolds, I can simply increase the run time of the second manifold and not have to worry about changing the settings on the injector.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 10:01 AM
I have an EZ Flo main line system, I have had it for 5+ years, I use it for all of my planting beds (sprays) and planting boxes (micro). I had it set up with spray heads on my front lawn, but with the odd shape it is nearly imposible to get an even spray over the lawn and it always ended up getting stripped. I constantly found that I had to clean the strainers at the spray heads every few weeks. What I did was use two zone valves for each zone. Basically there are two seperate manafolds. One is fed from the the injector, the other manifold is fed from the water source. My beeds are 8 zones. After the 8 zones being fed by the injector run through their program, zones 9-16 run briefly with straight water to flush the lines and strainers. So basically zone 1 is fed by valve 1 & 9, zone 2 is fed by valves 2 & 10, etc.... Since I implemented the second manifold I do not see as much of a problem, the strainers last about the same as amount of time between cleanings as the non-injected zones.

If it was designed correctly you should not have stripes. Do you have matched precipitation rates? Are you using water soluable fert? Liquid will not give you problems like the water soluable.

Thanks for the semper fi wetboots!

Kiril
12-28-2012, 10:30 AM
If it was designed correctly you should not have stripes. Do you have matched precipitation rates? Are you using water soluable fert? Liquid will not give you problems like the water soluable.

Thanks for the semper fi wetboots!

Matched PR means nothing here. DU is what you are looking for, and you will never get 100% DU in a sprinkler system .... EVER! Also, people that think that you can run fertilizer through your sprinkler system without having to perform maintenance to remove biological buildup are wrong.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 10:41 AM
Matched PR means nothing here. DU is what you are looking for, and you will never get 100% DU in a sprinkler system .... EVER! Also, people that think that you can run fertilizer through your sprinkler system without having to perform maintenance to remove biological buildup are wrong.

What is DU? I would be willing to bet that he does not have MPR. Before I became a factory authorized installer I talked to dozens of contractors that have installed the EZ Flo. Once they switched to liquid they had no more problems.

Kiril
12-28-2012, 11:05 AM
What is DU? I would be willing to bet that he does not have MPR.

DU = distribution uniformity, a term you should know if you are going to advise people on their irrigation systems. Also, there is no such animal as MPR. It is physically impossible to match PR in a given area with a sprinkler system.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 11:15 AM
DU = distribution uniformity, a term you should know if you are going to advise people on their irrigation systems. Also, there is no such animal as MPR. It is physically impossible to match PR in a given area with a sprinkler system.

well not to sound like an idiot but wouldnt du be the same thing as mpr? I know you cant get exact mpr but you can get it close enough to avoid stripes in the lawn. been in the business a lot of years and went to the rain bird acedemy and have never heard the term du

Kiril
12-28-2012, 11:23 AM
well not to sound like an idiot but wouldnt du be the same thing as mpr? I know you cant get exact mpr but you can get it close enough to avoid stripes in the lawn. been in the business a lot of years and went to the rain bird acedemy and have never heard the term du

No offense Randal, but if you haven't heard of DU then you need to go back to the academy. Matched precipitation rate applies to sprinkler nozzle output (in this case) in a given area. It has essentially no meaning with respect to the entire area being irrigated. In other words, just because you have "matched" precipitation rate between your nozzles in no way means you have a uniform PR over the entire area ..... a.k.a. DU.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 11:41 AM
No offense Randal, but if you haven't heard of DU then you need to go back to the academy. Matched precipitation rate applies to sprinkler nozzle output (in this case) in a given area. It has essentially no meaning with respect to the entire area being irrigated. In other words, just because you have "matched" precipitation rate between your nozzles in no way means you have a uniform PR over the entire area ..... a.k.a. DU.

no offense taken. I fully understand what you are saying.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 11:56 AM
no offense taken. I fully understand what you are saying.

I just went back in my books frfom the rb acedemy. we just touched on du and i had a note in my book saying they teach more about it in an auditors course.

DU= avg catch in the lowest quartile divided by the avg catch overall x 100

derived from the Coefficient of Uniformity (CU) formula

you are a pretty smart guy Kiril, where did you get all your knowledge? The auditors course is on my list of classes I want to take.

its stuff like this that makes me laugh when a homeowner thinks we just go throw pipe and heads in the ground and call it a sprinkler system.

Kiril
12-28-2012, 12:33 PM
I just went back in my books frfom the rb acedemy. we just touched on du and i had a note in my book saying they teach more about it in an auditors course.

DU= avg catch in the lowest quartile divided by the avg catch overall x 100

derived from the Coefficient of Uniformity (CU) formula

you are a pretty smart guy Kiril, where did you get all your knowledge? The auditors course is on my list of classes I want to take.

its stuff like this that makes me laugh when a homeowner thinks we just go throw pipe and heads in the ground and call it a sprinkler system.

DU doesn't necessarily have to be for the low quarter. It has been suggested the low half is a better value to use. These are the values I calculate for catch can audits with respect to DU and PR.

UCC
Cu
DU25
DU30
DU50
DU75
UCCw_ave
Cuw-ave
DUw_ave25
DUw_ave30
DUw_ave50
DUw_ave75
PRave
PR25
PR30
PR50
PR75
PRw_ave
PRw_ave25
PRw_ave30
PRw_ave50
PRw_ave75

RandalatA1Sprinklers
12-28-2012, 12:51 PM
DU doesn't necessarily have to be for the low quarter. It has been suggested the low half is a better value to use. These are the values I calculate for catch can audits with respect to DU and PR.

UCC
Cu
DU25
DU30
DU50
DU75
UCCw_ave
Cuw-ave
DUw_ave25
DUw_ave30
DUw_ave50
DUw_ave75
PRave
PR25
PR30
PR50
PR75
PRw_ave
PRw_ave25
PRw_ave30
PRw_ave50
PRw_ave75

I was just giving you the definition from the book. not trying to get in a pi$$ing match with you.

1idejim
12-28-2012, 01:24 PM
I was just giving you the definition from the book. not trying to get in a pi$$ing match with you.

That's no pisn match, post more often.
Posted via Mobile Device

Kiril
12-28-2012, 01:34 PM
I was just giving you the definition from the book. not trying to get in a pi$$ing match with you.

Just letting you know what some "authorities" have to say ..... like the IA.

GreenI.A.
12-28-2012, 02:51 PM
If it was designed correctly you should not have stripes. Do you have matched precipitation rates? Are you using water soluable fert? Liquid will not give you problems like the water soluable.

Thanks for the semper fi wetboots!

Did you miss the sentance where I said the lawn is an odd shape and it is nearly imposible to get an even spray? The area is mostly beds with numerous grass paths running betwwen them ranging from 2' wide to 20'. I'm not sure what you know about ferts, but using high nitrogen or iron, you can very easily stripe a lawn.