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Sneaky
08-10-2004, 09:56 PM
Asked this question a couple weeks ago but I'm still puzzled. I've had a couple local lco's look and they don't know either.. Anyway here's the problem... I have one lawn that is mostly centipede that about three days after I mow the wheel tracks turn a reddish color. The blades of grass will stay this color for about a week. This is the only lawn in the neighborhood that I didn't fertilize this year and this is the only one doing this. The only thing I can think of is deficiency of iron or sulfur. Any advice would be great.

Runner
08-11-2004, 09:35 AM
Is it possible that it is rust, and that maybe it builds up on the tires and leaves the tracks? Is the lawn new, like within it's second year?

KCON1
08-11-2004, 09:47 AM
iron deficiency will make centipede leaves turn a purplish red color, and I have seen it when you drive a heavy vehicle such as car or truck turn this color where the wheel tracks are for a couple days to a week but haven't seen it from a lawnmower before, I'll check into that I have a Buddy thats a professor at NCSU works in the turf grass research division I'll see what he says

Sneaky
08-11-2004, 10:00 PM
sure would like the help kcon1 because I have no clue what it is.

jabbo
03-08-2005, 11:55 AM
I have this same problem and would really like to find a salution to it. For the past two years every time I cut my grass or run over it with a truck or anything the tracks turn red for a week or so or until we have a good rain. My soil samples from last year indicated that my ph was ok and did not recommend any lime, so I don't know what the problem is.

jabbo
03-09-2005, 05:50 AM
please bump

HOMER
03-09-2005, 06:00 AM
Same here, :angry: so if we ever get an answer I can explain it to the customers who really don't like it!

QualityLawnCare4u
03-09-2005, 06:38 AM
Sneaky, I have never had that to happen, so Im curious too what the answer is.

YardPro
03-09-2005, 07:01 AM
brusing
happens here also

lampeslawnservice
03-09-2005, 12:08 PM
My guess would be rust, I had it in my back yard before. When you walk thru the yard with white shoe's do they turn oarngish red. If so then definitly rust. The back yard I did not fertilize or water as often due to the our dog in back. No problems up front though!

QualityLawnCare4u
03-09-2005, 12:10 PM
BTW Sneaky, how did you like all the high wind we had yesterday? Every yard I done today looked like a warzone, limbs and pine cones galore.

jabbo
03-09-2005, 02:13 PM
I do not think it is rust. I think it is more on the lines of a fertilizer defficency because there is no sign of anything that comes of the grass. I just don't know exactly what to add to my spring feeding to stop this. Thanks for your reply anyway!

jabbo
03-10-2005, 11:12 AM
bump please

moremowing4me
03-10-2005, 11:52 AM
This is just my opinion so don't bash me if you disagree,but I think that it is just from the soil being to compact in that area. 95% of my yards are centipede, and I have this problem as well, and it can sometimes be throughout the whole yard if the customer does not let me aerate. I have also noticed this in yards that have an abundance of spittle bug. I dont know if this is the proper name for them but they are black with red stripes on them,and fly up on my mower as Im cutting. My old supervisor at the nursery that I worked at through high school tol me that they were called spittle bugs, because they leave what appears to be spit at the bottom of whatever plant or grass that they are feeding off of. Also in the yards that I mentioned that have this problem throughout are only lush and green around the fire ant beds because of their natural aeraion Im assuming. Hope this helps in some way. :waving:

jabbo
05-05-2005, 08:35 AM
I just wanted to open this thread back up to see if anything had come up with any idea as to what may be causing the red tracks in centipede about three days after driving over it.

The mayor
05-05-2005, 09:10 AM
I thought I read somewhere that it is a fungus spore. If I remember right you can bring it from one lawn to another. hope not but it is what it sounds like.

marko
05-05-2005, 09:57 AM
You should have a soil analysis done. This will tell what nutrients are in the soil and the Ph. Centipede grows best at a Ph. of 5.5.Any higher will reduce the amount of iron uptake from the soil.Also check the amount of phosphorus. If it is too high it can cause the leaf blades to turn purple.Also make sure you are not applying too much nitrogen fertilizer as centipede does not need very much at all.Only apply .5 to 1.0 pounds of actual nitrogen per 1000 sq.ft. per year in 1-2 applications. You can get fertility recommendations from your local cooperative extension. The recommendations will be base on the soil analysis.


This was copied from another forum.

The Captain
05-05-2005, 04:32 PM
Did kcon1 ever respond? He was going to check whith a friend of his @NCSU turf research.

Jim

T Edwards
05-05-2005, 05:57 PM
I think HardWorkingPoorMan is following Sneaky around and painting those tire marks on that lawn.

C'mon.......fess up.

jabbo
05-06-2005, 01:46 PM
Thanks for the replies.This is my personnel yard so I'm trying to fix the problem myself.So Marko, lets say that my ph is around 5.5 to 6.5( I pulled a soil sample last year and from what I remember that is what it showed) and my phosphorus is high what can I do to fix this problem. Another thing is I have very sandy dirt! I would like to fix this problem so that I can apply about the same thing every year and not have to worry with it. I have already applied 15-0-15 with 3% iron at 20 lbs. per 5000 sqft. Any help greatly appreciated!!!

marko
05-07-2005, 01:01 AM
I am by no means an expert and do not deal with centipede at all. I have read numerous articles, but that is the limit of my experience. With that in mind, if it was my lawn, or a clients, I would stop applying phosphorus, Fertilize in May with 1/2 lb N per 1000 SF and possibly again in July with 1/2 lb N/1000 SF. Centipede grass is a very low N user and amounts of more than 1 lb are not recommended unless you are a pro (either a lot of experience with centipede or degreed). I would never fertilize after July (this would leave you open to centipede decline) which is a PITA anyway due to fluctuating temperatures during the winter. A few cold weeks, a couple of warm days, then a cold front plays hell with centipede. You might also want to add some iron by either adding 1 teaspoon ferrous sulfate per 3 gallons of water per 1,000 SF or spread iron chelate every 3 or 4 weeks to help with color. Centipede grass should be yellowish green, not dark green. This is the easiest, and simplest fix. What is misleading on some soil test is the chemicals used to pull the values out for N, P, K. One of the test for P are I think Modified Morgans Solution. If this was the chemical used to get a level reading on the P level in your soil, next time you have one done they should do a reactive Aluminum test as well. High Aluminum levels will slow the process of shedding extra P. It allows the soil to hold on to P levels longer and could take several years to get it back to normal. If you have high P levels, it hinders the iron uptake. Be observant and read everything you can about centipede decline. It usually sets in 3 - 6 years after establishment, but can be avoided for the most part with proper fert practices. Good Luck!

jay warner
05-07-2005, 07:18 AM
Are you guys using Z's on the yards that are having these problems? I had similar problems 7 years ago and as soon as I put walkbehinds on them my Red stripes disappeared. Maybe coincidence, maybe not? Too much weight for centipede.

jabbo
05-09-2005, 10:25 AM
I was looking at the soil samples I took last year. I took 4 different spots and only 1 of those spots really looks good. One difference that I saw was that the phosphorus level was lower in the good spot. Another difference was that the ph in the good spot is about 5.2 compared to the others 5.7,5.7 and 5.6. And the magnesium level was a good bit higher in the good spot. I live in middle GA and my lawn is 3-4 years old. I noticed this problem last year and it doesn't seem to be getting any better. The lawn is taking forever to green up all the way and I've already had to start watering some spots just because they look so bad. Like I stated earlier I have already put one application of 15-0-15 with 3% iron.One more thing that probably didn't help my lawn was that I bagged everytime I cut year before last before someone told me that it was not good to do that! I was wandering if there is any way to counter-act the high levels of phosphorus/ph or am I just going to have to wait it out! Thanks for the help everyone. MARKO sounds like he has the best explanation of whats going on with my lawn! I'll try to get some pics of the red tire tracks.

EC-Rider
05-09-2005, 10:51 AM
"here's the problem... I have one lawn that is mostly centipede that about three days after I mow the wheel tracks turn a reddish color. The blades of grass will stay this color for about a week. This is the only lawn in the neighborhood that I didn't fertilize this year and this is the only one doing this. The only thing I can think of is deficiency of iron or sulfur. Any advice would be great."

Iím seeing this problem also, but for the first time this yearÖor at least to the point that it is noticeable. :dizzy:

I have tried Iron, but in small dosage since it was too early in the year and not enough rain. Will try again in larger dose just before it rains and see how it does.

Itís all good, enjoy, peace!

Regards,

EC-Rider

bpdmower
05-09-2005, 04:18 PM
I've got the same problem on one of my centipede lawns, the others are ok. If anyone figures it out please let us know, it doesn't look very good.

Thanks

cqcknfire
05-28-2010, 03:34 PM
Bump, would like to know if anyone ever found a cure.

Butler Landscaping
05-28-2010, 04:51 PM
keep the ph 6.5-7.0, apply high-nirtrogen fertilizer, and apply disease control. yall should really go buy "all about lawns" the disease i found is called rust, and looks like rust

"anything moving through an infested area will be covered by the spores and may spread the disease" (such as tire tracks)

Big C
05-28-2010, 07:38 PM
This happens to all of my centepede account also....but not this early in the season.

Robert Pruitt
05-28-2010, 07:43 PM
i don't know a lot about centipede, but the fescue around here can get a form of brown patch. red thread. the dead grass has tiny red hairs growing off it. use a good fungicide.

cqcknfire
05-28-2010, 10:47 PM
This happens to all of my centepede account also....but not this early in the season.

It just started in my area will try to get a pic.

stoker
06-09-2012, 09:12 PM
Did anyone ever find out what the red coloring is coming from. I think this thread is like seven years old. Extensive research could have been done by now...haha...I get those red tire marks too, some mentioned are you using lazers and for me the answer is yes. I do know it has to do with the weight of the mower because I never get it when push mowing. Allot of people mentioned rust, it isnt rust. This is like the grass blade instead of being green in color turns reddish and it doesnt wipe off. Just like if it were bruised. Which is what I think it is but I have no idea what deficiency would cause the grass blades to bruise. Once again if anyone knows let me know, please...Ive been asking this question for years...haha...

Runner
06-10-2012, 07:40 PM
Ok...I'll give another possibility 8 years later. LOL (By the way,...thank you for bringing up old threads like this). It is very possible, and I mean VERY possible, this is nitrogen stress. This occurs in rather hotter temperatures, and or when temps take a substantial influx upwards. this is the same stress that makes tire tracks and wear marks to turn brown, as well (along with chemical burn as a common contributor with hot temps. Here is what happens physiologically; Nitrogen, as we know it, does two (main) things. It turns the grass green (through the chlorophyll), and it cause the leaf blade to grow. But HERE is what happens with the leaf blade growth. Plant cells have a cell wall (that consist of different parts as well, but we won't need to get in to all that). This cell wall has many purposes, such as helping in the structure and support of the plant. When plants grow with different amounts of nitrogen, this cell wall stretches like a rubber band. As it does, these cell walls get thinner...leaving the plant more prone to stress, thus leaving it more prone to disease and other ailments, as well. Now,...here's where it gets cool. There is a characteristic in plants known as "turgor pressure". This is the plant's ability to push itself back up. For instance, when a lawn is real healthy, you can feel it as you walk across it, as you can feel the grass pushing back up as you lift your feet. When elements such as potassium are not restored back in to the plant, in a proper ratio to the amount of N being applied, the plant's cell walls become thin, the grass gets weak and wimpy, and tends to just sort of lat over. "Big Green" national lawn care company's lawns are known to do this, because they feed a junk food diet of all show and no go (N being the cheapest element their is,...restoring and maintaining potassium amounts cost more). What happens is, with nitrogen stress, the early signs are the weak stands of grass I mentioned, and you can walk across the lawn, and two days later, still see the foot tracks. The cells get crushed... the plant is stressed, and inner decomposition occurs. This causes a discoloration and recovery is necessary. Another good example? Just like when people have a party and cars are driven on a lawn. The same thing occurs.
I sure hope this clears things up for you. : )

stoker
06-10-2012, 08:52 PM
Ok...I'll give another possibility 8 years later. LOL (By the way,...thank you for bringing up old threads like this). It is very possible, and I mean VERY possible, this is nitrogen stress. This occurs in rather hotter temperatures, and or when temps take a substantial influx upwards. this is the same stress that makes tire tracks and wear marks to turn brown, as well (along with chemical burn as a common contributor with hot temps. Here is what happens physiologically; Nitrogen, as we know it, does two (main) things. It turns the grass green (through the chlorophyll), and it cause the leaf blade to grow. But HERE is what happens with the leaf blade growth. Plant cells have a cell wall (that consist of different parts as well, but we won't need to get in to all that). This cell wall has many purposes, such as helping in the structure and support of the plant. When plants grow with different amounts of nitrogen, this cell wall stretches like a rubber band. As it does, these cell walls get thinner...leaving the plant more prone to stress, thus leaving it more prone to disease and other ailments, as well. Now,...here's where it gets cool. There is a characteristic in plants known as "turgor pressure". This is the plant's ability to push itself back up. For instance, when a lawn is real healthy, you can feel it as you walk across it, as you can feel the grass pushing back up as you lift your feet. When elements such as potassium are not restored back in to the plant, in a proper ratio to the amount of N being applied, the plant's cell walls become thin, the grass gets weak and wimpy, and tends to just sort of lat over. "Big Green" national lawn care company's lawns are known to do this, because they feed a junk food diet of all show and no go (N being the cheapest element their is,...restoring and maintaining potassium amounts cost more). What happens is, with nitrogen stress, the early signs are the weak stands of grass I mentioned, and you can walk across the lawn, and two days later, still see the foot tracks. The cells get crushed... the plant is stressed, and inner decomposition occurs. This causes a discoloration and recovery is necessary. Another good example? Just like when people have a party and cars are driven on a lawn. The same thing occurs.
I sure hope this clears things up for you. : )

Where did you learn all of that Willis:laugh:
Interesting. So how to avoid it is the question now? I would say less nitrogen but there are areas on the same grounds that this doesnt happen too that were fertilized and mowed the same way. Thank you for the explanation. I appreciate it.

Runner
06-10-2012, 09:18 PM
The information, among so much else I am blessed to have acquired, comes from my best friend John, of whom has several degrees in Turf Management from Michigan State, and was a golf course superintendent for many years, including at Warwick Hills, the home of the Buick Open. The man knows about all there is, and everyone around here has an ongoing joke about him that he could could grow grass on a rock - in someone's basement. lol
It probably needs more water,...and more potassium certainly would help. In the meantime, stagger your tire tracks to relieve some of the irritation, and if yo have gras that is laying over, it may (actually IS) beneficial to mow in the exact opposite direction (against your rows) to uplift the grass and allow some air circulation. I am willing to bet, those tire tracks are probably hot to the touch.