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John Gamba
08-23-2004, 09:10 PM
Can anybody tell me if there are Cinch Bugs In Connecticut? And if there are can you tell me how to kill them. This is to prove a point.

Thank you
John

NCL
08-23-2004, 09:13 PM
Do not know if Conn. Has chinch but telstar will kill them. Did you see any?

jajwrigh
08-24-2004, 12:03 AM
NCL-

Talstar perhaps?

KenH
08-24-2004, 07:59 AM
There are definately Chinch bugs in CT. For some reason, they like bentgrass especially. Talstar will knock them out.

John Gamba
08-24-2004, 08:30 AM
Originally posted by NCL
Do not know if Conn. Has chinch but telstar will kill them. Did you see any?

NO! But the sod lifts up like it has grubs but i dont see then either??
John

SWD
08-24-2004, 08:48 AM
John, did you do a soapy water flush in the soil of the effected turf area?
If not, try this:
Use 2-3 tablspns of lemon scented joy dishwashing detergent-nothing else will work as well, in a 2 gallon bucket of clean water (no mud or crap)
pour this over the effected site and wait to see what comes up.

John Gamba
08-24-2004, 11:37 AM
Originally posted by SWD
John, did you do a soapy water flush in the soil of the effected turf area?
If not, try this:
Use 2-3 tablspns of lemon scented joy dishwashing detergent-nothing else will work as well, in a 2 gallon bucket of clean water (no mud or crap)
pour this over the effected site and wait to see what comes up.

Thank you!!!!! I will.

John

HayBay
08-24-2004, 04:02 PM
Cut the bottom out of a large coffee can. SO you have a cylinder with the ends cut out. Then push one end of the coffee can into the ground a couple of inches. Then use the soap and water like SWD mentioned. The bugs will come up to the top if there.

John Gamba
08-24-2004, 04:24 PM
Originally posted by HayBay
Cut the bottom out of a large coffee can. SO you have a cylinder with the ends cut out. Then push one end of the coffee can into the ground a couple of inches. Then use the soap and water like SWD mentioned. The bugs will come up to the top if there.

Thanks Bud!! Will Do. I thought there was something missing from the old days LOLOL

John

Runner
08-24-2004, 04:48 PM
The problem with the coffee can method, is getting the coffee can down into the soil! Lotsa luck!

HayBay
08-24-2004, 05:47 PM
Yes if the ground is clay and very dry (no irrigation) you may need a jackhammer. hehe

John Gamba
08-24-2004, 05:54 PM
Originally posted by Runner
The problem with the coffee can method, is getting the coffee can down into the soil! Lotsa luck!

Thanks Joe!! LOLOLOL

James Cormier
08-24-2004, 06:16 PM
John, you can find chinch just by gettin on your hands and knees and look for them, sunny dry slopes is where they love to feed.

Talstar does work great on them, or if you have any dursban left over that also will work. Dylox dosnt work very good becasue it works through the thatch too fast.

By the way chich are suckers, and surface feeders, the stick there snouts into the grass plant and suck the life out of it

HayBay
08-24-2004, 07:02 PM
Several sampling schemes have been developed for determining chinch bug populations in turf. The simplest method is to visually inspect the turf by spreading the canopy. Chinch bug nymphs tend to hide in the deeper thatch and careful inspection is necessary. Unfortunately, eggs and small chinch bugs are easily missed using this technique. A more reliable method is to use the flotation technique, counting the number of adults and nymphs present over a 10 minute span. To use the flotation technique, cut the top lid out and the bottom lid and rim off a one gallon can. Twist the sharp edge of the can through the turf into the underlying soil. Fill the can with water. Refill if the water soaks into the ground before the 10 minute period. Populations of 25-30 individuals per square foot warrant control, especially if these numbers are encountered in June and July. More complicated sampling methods use repeated sampling over a long period of time, relating the population numbers to temperature and humidity parameters in order to predict future populations.

Heres 1 type:

HayBay
08-24-2004, 07:03 PM
.................................

tremor
08-24-2004, 07:51 PM
We have plenty of Chinch bugs here in CT. They often show up on southern slopes of Creeping Red Fescue as early as May. They especially like to overwinter in Cottoneaster beds with Pine Straw mulch.

The # 10 cans from restaurants work better than coffee cans.

To the soapy water it is useful to add a couple drops of Permethrin as an antagonist to really flush them out quickly.

Don't look in the dead brown areas. Chinch bugs aren't stupid. They'll move to the greener areas & may be found near the margins, but not in the dead thatch.

They don't proliferate in the shade.

lawnboyCO
08-24-2004, 09:57 PM
does any know how likely chinch bugs are in colorado, i have some 10 year old publications issued by the state university that says they are very uncommon in our state but things could have changed since then. All the "VETERANS" at my job claim to them all the time but i don't know if they really know what they are talking about.

John Gamba
08-25-2004, 07:47 AM
I want to thank all of you for your time and expertise. Now what i'm getting from this is they dont live in the dirt like grubs but in the Thatch. Why dont the birds and skunks eat them?? i see NO bird pecking at all.
Oh thanks for the tip on the dead grass. I will look for them in the green grass.
John

HayBay
08-25-2004, 08:01 AM
here John, take a look:

http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/sheets/chinchbug.html

http://iaa.umd.edu/umturf/Insects/Chinch_Bugs.html

Heres something else I found:

They prefer hot, sunny areas and frequent weakened or stressed grasses. Reduce the stress
by heavy watering and organic fertilizers.
To control them, simply water/drench the infested lawn with a hose end sprayer with either
dish soap and/or Safe Solutions' Enzyme Cleaner with Peppermint. Then cover that portion of your lawn with large
flannel sheets. The bugs will cling, wait 15 minutes, remove the sheet and scrape any
surviving bugs into the trash.
There also are resistant grass cultivars/varieties. You can reseed/replug with these. You
can also discourage them by shading your lawn with trees or shrubs.
There also are many predators, e.g.. Big-eyed bugs, wasps, ladybugs, birds, and earwigs -
thay all eat chinch bugs, but, the poisons kill these allies.
Aerate and fertilize with an organic fertilizer in Spring and Fall.. Remove the thatch

kickin sum grass
08-25-2004, 09:58 PM
For years in Ohio the control method issued by OSU was to water heavy and keep it soaked. They would drown in a very short period of time. At the last conference the discussion was that now they have discovered the the cinch bug has adapted to wet location and could do the back stroke. The funny thing is that they have only adapted in certain parts of Ohio. I would guess where population are repeated for years. Now if we see an infestation OSU wants to be contacted so they can do research on this drowning method and their ability to learn to swim.

lawnguy26
08-26-2004, 10:34 PM
They like dry areas(soil) because there is a beneficial fungi in wet soils. However, I regularly find them in very wet conditions. We just went through a hurricane and since have had rain everyday; they are still extremely active. Consider yourself lucky if you rarely have to deal with them and Talstar still knocks them out. Here in Florida they have built up a resistant to Talstar. Demon and Dylox work but are not consistent. We've had to do many retreats in many cases to control them. Is anybody else in Florida having these problems???

grassguy_
08-27-2004, 08:23 PM
Chinchbugs were onve fairly heavy in Ohio back about 10-15 years ago but for the longest time seem to have thinned down in population. However there has been a rebound in the last few years and this year we have seen a number of start up infestations. There are actually different types of chinch for both the warm season areas of the south and the cool season grasses in the North. James indicated that they suck the life out of the grass, and to some degree that is true but they will also inject an enzyme back into a grass plant which will disrupt the transfer of sugars in photosynthesis thus injuring or even killing off the plant attacked. Many surface controls like Talstar, Deltagard, permethrin, will work well, but key is getting them watered into the thatch where they will nest. The old stand by organophosphates, Sevin, Diazinon, and Dursban worked well too but for most of us they are gone or going for turf use.