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View Full Version : minimum size excavator to dump in 10 wheeler


francois
09-11-2004, 12:54 PM
Hi, I would like to know what is the minimum size excavator that can dump in a 10 wheel dump truck. I don't know the height of my truck, but my case 1838 is barely dumping in it.

I realize that different excavators may have different specs, but what is the average weight class that can do this? 4 metric tons class?, 5? , 6?

Thanks for any hints

Tigerotor77W
09-11-2004, 10:57 PM
If you 1838 is barely dumping into it, you'll probably want a 7-metric ton or so.

Why do you need an excavator? Are you looking to replace the 1838 with it? (Other machines may be more efficient. Not saying you don't know what you need -- just checking.)

francois
09-12-2004, 12:03 AM
I don't want to replace the 1838, and I certainly don't need any excavator.

I only have 3 payments left on my NH555e backhoe and I'm starting to look at something new.

The excavator came to my mind because it dose'nt have the biggest limitation of the backhoe: no 360 deg rotation, and not being able to dump directly in my truck is not an option.

Thanks for your answer

Francois

UNISCAPER
09-12-2004, 12:20 PM
Look into a 305 Caterpillar. We dig lots of swimming pools with them. Great on rock and shales as well.

Tigerotor77W
09-12-2004, 03:28 PM
Yup, a 305 size will do all right. If you find it a little small, you might want to look into a 307C or 308C (308 is minimal radius).

Bobcat 337, 442; Deere 35C or 27C; anything that has about 30-50 horsepower should be adequate.

How much digging are you planning on doing?

DUSTYCEDAR
09-12-2004, 04:27 PM
its not the size of the machine its the length of the stick!
u can get a smaller machine with a long stick
it all depends what u r diggin in and if it is full of rock or soft

Tigerotor77W
09-12-2004, 07:03 PM
^ There you go.

Swanman
09-12-2004, 09:31 PM
I have a 341 Bobcat with a 24" bucket which is about 1/5 of a yard. My tandem axle dump can legally hold roughly 10 yards of material. It take lots of buckets to fill as you can do the math as well. My 185 skid steer is a lots more efficient at loading the truck unless your loading debris with the 341 using the clamp and a grapple bucket.

ksss
09-12-2004, 11:12 PM
I have a Takeuchi TB53. It is probably the best truck loading mini excavator I have run. The boom shifts side to side allowing the arm to move to the side of the cab for great clearance. The 53 weighs about 13,000 pounds.

Branching Out
09-26-2004, 10:09 PM
I have a simular question. I am looking for something that will rip driveways out and still dump into a 10 wheeler. But, it also needs to be able to have a grade box on the back, and switch a back hoe on demand to do rip outs.

I know it's alot to ask of one machine, but I am looking for a machine to do double duty........grading, and rip out.

Branching out........

UNISCAPER
09-26-2004, 11:11 PM
257B Caterpillar with a box scaper, and back hoe attachment. You could also use a 248, for that type of work high flow is needed for when you make transitions and need a planer, or in winter a snow blower.

The rubber tracks on demo would have to be used with care, you can load all day long as long as you are not riding over the broken pieces, and you make 3 point turns rather than doughnuts.

We use ours with a breaker, set of forks, and 6 way blade. We are getting a vibratory roller for base as well. It shaves lots of hours off the work, and we charge $175.00 an hour for it's usage.

Tigerotor77W
09-27-2004, 11:33 AM
I have a simular question. I am looking for something that will rip driveways out and still dump into a 10 wheeler. But, it also needs to be able to have a grade box on the back, and switch a back hoe on demand to do rip outs.

I know it's alot to ask of one machine, but I am looking for a machine to do double duty........grading, and rip out.

Branching out........

I'm going to be be brief (wrong thread for me to post long answer), but I would suggest staying away from tracks machines in general. They'll allow you to rip out extremely more efficiently than a wheeled machine would, but you could easily gouge out the tracks... which are expensive. Whereas on a wheel machine you could end up with more flats, you also have the ability to order solid wheels...

As a result, I suggest taking a look at the Bobcat A300 or Case 90XT, both of which should be what you're looking for. If you'll be ripping out driveways I wouldn't recommend anything smaller than a machine with 2500 ROC... you could do it, but probably not as effectively as a machine with that extra weight and power.