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View Full Version : which truck 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton?


moneyman
09-20-2004, 08:04 AM
I need a pickup that can haul at least 7000lbs on occasion. How do 1/2 tons handle 7000lbs saying it had a v8 engine?

LawnScapers of Dayton
09-20-2004, 08:46 AM
We probably need a little more info........Do want to haul with a trailer or in the bed? My guess would be go with the 3/4....

Derek

Eric 1
09-20-2004, 12:27 PM
If you plan on hauling 7000 you need a 1 ton,if you plan on towing it you need at least a 3/4, I have a 1/2 and have only ever pulled more than 5000 on it once, it was to much (duh) i did not have a choice. It can pull 4000 fine, as long as it has brakes.But hauling is a hole other story, 2000 lbs MAX. I try to never exceed 1200.

moneyman
09-21-2004, 01:47 AM
sorry, I will be towing 7000lbs. I didnt even think a 3/4 ton could handle 3000lbs weight in the bed, hence 3/4 ton.

l1011100
09-21-2004, 02:08 AM
I have had several 1/2 tons and 2 years ago I bought a 2500HD 3/4 ton but is actually a 1 ton frame and I dont know how I was pulling trailer before. There is a huge differance is handling. If you can do it go with at least the 3/4 ton

blafleur
09-22-2004, 03:09 PM
If in doubt, go with the 3/4 ton, that way you are covered when you have those few jobs that pop up that have the extra capacity is appreciated. I have had 4000lb in my 3/4 ton, I dont recommend it, and wont do it again, but it handled it.

I just wont have anything less than a 3/4 ton for working anymore.

Bryan

KurtisInIowa
09-23-2004, 06:10 PM
I thought a ton was 2,000 lbs? (or 2,240lbs actually). I never have understood what 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton, or 1 ton really mean? So, here goes....what DO they mean? Geez, do I feel silly for not knowing....

I tow my 6,000 lb boat with my 1/2 ton Durango. It's pushing it, but handles it okay. I kept a real close eye on my tranny fluid and inspected/changed it twice this summer with all the boat towing, seems to be doing fine. It's actually got 3.55 geared diffs. and 35" swampers which lowers the effective ratio even more. I'm only turning 2K on the tach on 3rd gear on the hwy. Scared the heck out of me at first, thinking I'd burn up my tranny in short order, but seems to be fine.

kaptain_k

blafleur
09-23-2004, 06:52 PM
The ton rating refers to the manufactorer's of the payload capacity(load added to the truck by you), this includes passengers, fuel, tools, and cargo. Towing capacity is different and is based on the package you purchased, it should be posted in your owners manual.

Many people (including me) believe they post a certain rating knowing that many people will go over it, but if you do, they are not responsible. Heavy duty pickups seem to have more fudge factor built in, that is they handle the people like me who push the ratings. Like I said, I have put 4000 lbs in my 3/4 ton pickup. This is grossly overweight, by double, and I wont do it again, but it handled it.

A 1/2 ton pickup may be rated for, say, 9000 lbs towing, and a 3/4 ton pickup may be rated for 13000 lbs towing, but the 3/4 ton pickup can usually handle towing over that rating (especially with a diesel engine) better than the 1/2 ton can handle just under its rated towing capacity. Thats why I feel better with at least a 3/4 ton pu, most people who use their pu's to work, eventually push the ratings.

These opinions are not based on scientific fact, just my observations. Anyone feel free to refute them.

Bryan

KurtisInIowa
09-23-2004, 11:15 PM
Well that's what I figured, it was the payload rating. Still seems odd though. For instance, my Durango has seating for 9, yet only rated to stuff 1,100lbs. in it? Show me a group of 9 adults that doesn't exceed 1,100lbs. Really, I guess it'd seat 6 'comfortably' in the 3 rows...so 6 at 200 lbs.....I guess that works at 1,200lbs....NO beer tho, you're already over!

~K_K

Acute Cut
09-24-2004, 10:52 AM
blafleur-
I too have done almost the same. I did a full pallet of legacy blocks. I was told it was 3500 lbs. My mud flaps were about an inch off of the ground. I just had the guys push the pallet over the axles and i seemed to do ok. I have a 95 dodge 2500. This was the first time i really pushed my truck like that. This winter i am going to put some overload springs on there. I know that will make the truck squat less, do you think it is still unwise to haul that much in the bed? (I hate delivery charges)

GreenMonster
09-24-2004, 11:06 AM
(I hate delivery charges)

Oh man, I'll take the delivery almost anytime, unless it's a small amount. I just add the price of delivery into price. Realistically, the customer is paying for delivery either way -- a.) pay for my time to pick up and deliver b.) pay for supplier to deliver.

Why not have supplier deliver and save your time, and wear and tear on vehicle?

As far as a work truck goes, or IMO, any truck for that matter, I will never again have anything less than a 3/4 ton. If you're towing 7000lbs it would be in your best interest to have trailer brakes. They make all the difference in the world.

I towed my skid steer with a 1/2 ton before -- almost 8000lbs between trailer and skid steer. She did the job, but didn't like it. I wouldn't recommend it. Towing same set-up with my 1 ton, you hardly know it's there. Add another 2000 lbs with the mini x (instead of skid) and it makes a significant difference.

Acute Cut
09-24-2004, 11:10 AM
Let me rephrase that. I hate delivery charges for small stuff. I.e. a pallet or two of stuff or up to 4 yards of loose material.

GreenMonster
09-24-2004, 11:15 AM
Let me rephrase that. I hate delivery charges for small stuff. I.e. a pallet or two of stuff or up to 4 yards of loose material.

I can respect that, but two pallets of hardscape material can be pushing 7000#! That's a lot for a 3/4 ton, single rear wheel pick-up. Plus, how are you getting the stuff out of the truck? If it's delivered, they put it right where you want it.

blafleur
09-24-2004, 11:34 PM
Acute cut, I agree with everything Greenmonster said. It actually took a humble woman customer to point out that for about $50, I could have the (in that case stone) vendor deliver, leaving me with another hour to do prep or pick up something else, and the delivery man could place it exactly where I wanted it, and she was paying for it anyway.

I still pick up materials, but usually in my trailer. Using your truck to haul heavy stuff disproportionately wears it out. The overload springs help the suspension, but the transmission, brakes, etc. take a beating. Doing it a couple of times is one thing, but intending a pickup for something it wasnt designed is just not a good idea. Just my opinion.

Bryan

Acute Cut
09-24-2004, 11:51 PM
Good points guys. I honestly only do it rarely as i am just now breaking into the landscape side of things. I was just curious if this was a bad idea or not. If i had two pallets i would have them delivered.
Sigh, gotta go, kids crying, ill catch up later with yall.

fourseasonlawns
10-01-2004, 02:00 AM
Most cases, v8 engine in 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton are the same.
The difference lies in the rear end and springs.

I have a 2000 1/2 ton with overload springs (a must on a 1/2 ton), and a 1981 3/4 ton.
ONLY advantage my 1/2 ton has is A/C and ABS Braking.
I've added brakes to both axles on my trailer.
The bigger the better when it comes to trucks.

Dig-it Landscaping
10-01-2004, 06:48 PM
i got a 95 2500 dodge with a CUMMINS i have had between 5000-6000lbs. in the back and it had a good 1-2 " before the suspention would be bottomed out. the other day i hauled 4 skids of block with it. the pavers i was hauling were 3000lbs. per skid. i had 1 skid in the bed of the truck and 3 skids on my dump trailer which weighs 3800lbs. empty. so i had 3000 in the truck and the trailer was at 12800lbs. pulled it great no problems stoping either. i don't have anything done to the suspention except a leveling kit in the front. oh and after that i got the other trailer an picked up 3.5 more pallets of block.

GreenMonster
10-01-2004, 09:20 PM
i got a 95 2500 dodge with a CUMMINS i have had between 5000-6000lbs. in the back and it had a good 1-2 " before the suspention would be bottomed out. the other day i hauled 4 skids of block with it. the pavers i was hauling were 3000lbs. per skid. i had 1 skid in the bed of the truck and 3 skids on my dump trailer which weighs 3800lbs. empty. so i had 3000 in the truck and the trailer was at 12800lbs. pulled it great no problems stoping either. i don't have anything done to the suspention except a leveling kit in the front. oh and after that i got the other trailer an picked up 3.5 more pallets of block.

to me, it begs the question "why not have it delivered?"

two trips for 7.5 skids. A full delivery here is 8 pallet.

I just find my time is better on site, vs. running around for materials.

Dig-it Landscaping
10-02-2004, 09:27 AM
Yeah i understand where you are coming from but rain wasn't letting us work and it was toowet for them to deliver. it was also on the saturday of labor day weekend so they were closed and wouldn't deliver luckily the manufacturing plant was still open and they could load me up and bill me later. and to top it all i only had a few days before i had to leave for fall quarter of college. believe me from now on i will have anything in that quantity delivered

GreenMonster
10-02-2004, 08:08 PM
well, that's actually a very reasonable explanation. We've all been in the position were you gotta....

"Get er done!"

Good job! :)