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View Full Version : Bluebird overseeder and overseeding.


Joel B.
09-20-2004, 11:16 AM
I requested some information on a overseeder a local rental shop has and this is the response I got:

"We rent, at our business, a Bluebird overseeder for lawn seeding. It is a walk behind unit that is not self-propelled. It slices into the ground, drops the seed and has a flap to help cover the seed up."

Does this sound like a "slit-seeder"?

Has anyone ever used this particular seeder?

Is this going to be a nightmare to push since it is not self propelled?

Would this do a better job than spreading a layer of dirt over the yard, broadcasting seed on top and then raking in the seed?

Does "starter fertilizer" help existing grass? and conversely, Does "regular fertilizer" help new seed?

If I want to feed the new seed and existing grass, do I have to fertilize twice with two different fertilizers?

Thank you for any advice,

Joel B.

mastercare
09-20-2004, 11:59 AM
This bluebird seeder is an overseeder; also called a slice-seeder, slit-seeder, etc. It's all the same thing. Will you have difficulty without self-propelled? That depends on how hard the ground is. If you're dealing with soft, flat land, it shouldn't be a problem. One tip for you is to water the daylights out of the area before you start slicing. That will make the ground softer, and give you plenty of moisture to start the seedlings.

Which is better, slice seeding, or topdressing with topsoil? Both will work fine as long as you give it plenty of water. I re-seeded the back yard of my new house (4500 sqft.) all with topsoil and a spreader. We brought in 30 yds of topsoil, spread it 2-3 inches thick. Used a fert spreader, then lightly ran a dirt rake over the surface to bury more of the seeds. Then, spread 3 bales of straw over it, and watered like crazy. It's now thick and green and looks beautiful! Lots of work, but much cheaper than sod. Also, don't be afraid to use too much seed. You can use almost double the recomended rate. Especially when you're spreading it on top. Lots of seed may be dried out, not burried, or just not grow becuase they won't get buried. Seed is cheap, don't be afraid to use plenty! The slice seeder will use less seed, and save the hassle of spreading all that straw. Still needs water, but not as much. Just make sure the grade is set, and that everything on the land is dead, so that you don't invite the existing grass/weeds to overtake the weak seedlings.

Fertilizer: You can use starter fertilizer (18-24-12) on existing lawns. Don't use two separate applications on the same area. If your grass is split up, use regular fert on the existing turf, and starter fert on the new stuff. It really helps, an will give the root system a jump start. Just don't do it on a really hot day, or when the grass is really wet. If you can't separate new from old areas, you can use the starter fert. on the whole thing. Just remember not to do it when you have REALLY hot and dry weather. But definitley only fertilize once.

Sorry this was so long, but I saw that nobody hand posted a response yet. Hope this helps

Richard Martin
09-20-2004, 12:54 PM
I have a Blue Bird slit seeder and the slicers pull it along just fine. At times you have to hold it back to keep it from running away.

Joel B.
09-20-2004, 01:40 PM
mastercare: Thanks for all the info. I am confused about one thing. You said: "Just make sure the grade is set, and that everything on the land is dead, so that you don't invite the existing grass/weeds to overtake the weak seedlings." Maybe I have my terms all wrong but I thought overseeding was seeding over an existing lawn to thicken it up. Can I use the Bluebird oveerseeder on an existing lawn? Can I spread topsoil say 1/2"-3/4" deep (so as not to smother existing grass) and broadcast seed/rake in?

Excuse my ignorance.........

Joel B.

Joel B.
09-20-2004, 06:44 PM
Bump......

Kelly's Landscaping
09-20-2004, 06:52 PM
Iíve used the Blue Bird slit seeder, a Ryan slit seeder, and the Lesco renovator. Which one did I like best let me put it this way I now own the Lesco renovator much more pleasant to use then the other 2 but they all work well. Blue Birds to light and its not self propelled and the Ryan is a beast and thatís not a good thing either thing weighed over 500 pounds.

Joel B.
09-21-2004, 12:52 AM
Kelly and Richard:

Do you use the Blue Bird on existing lawns (how bad does it tear up the existing grass) or is it just to be used for seeding new lawns where there is just dirt and no existing grass?

Do you kill the existing grass as mastercare suggested?

Thank you,

Joel B.

Richard Martin
09-21-2004, 02:27 AM
Do you use the Blue Bird on existing lawns (how bad does it tear up the existing grass) or is it just to be used for seeding new lawns where there is just dirt and no existing grass?

Do you kill the existing grass as mastercare suggested?


I use mine on exisitng lawns and the results are very good. It does tear up exisitng grass but if you had a good lawn to begin with you wouldn't be overseeding anyway. I do not kill the existing lawn.

Joel B.
09-21-2004, 09:59 AM
Thanks Richard. After reading these posts, I'm thinking my lawn isn't bad enough to use the mechanical overseeder. Can I spread topsoil say 1/2"-1" deep (so as not to smother existing grass) and broadcast seed/rake in? Seems like that would be a less destructive way of overseeding. Would that work to thicken the lawn?

Thank you for all advice,

Joel B.

mastercare
09-21-2004, 10:00 AM
Sorry for the confusion. You certainly can use the seeder through an existing lawn. When I wrote that I was picturing my lawn, when I went through the process. My grass was nothing but a weedbed, so I killled everything with roundup first. I was picturing a weed-filled lawn. If you have some grass, just too thin, go ahead and use it right over top of the existing grass.

Joel B.
09-21-2004, 06:35 PM
Thanks Dan. How bad does the seeder tear up the lawn? What does an existing lawn look like after using an overseeder? Is it really torn up or does it just have some lines where the "slits" are? How long does it take for the marks to "heal"?

Sounds like it would be easier to use the overseeder than to spread all that topsoil but I don't want to do more harm than good using the seeder.

Thanks again, to all, for the advice,

Joel B.

Mindless
09-21-2004, 08:01 PM
Fyi...I had a conversation with a Classen rep today and a couple of options for seeding lawns surfaced which doesn't tear up existing lawns such as with a slice seeder or a dethatcher. These are Classen products: Drill Seeder, Model DS-20 or Turf Rake Model TSS-20H (Honda Engine) or TSS-20B (Briggs & Stratton Engine). The Model DS-20H/B is hydrostatic driven and therefore self-propelled.

Joel B.
09-21-2004, 08:55 PM
Thanks Mindless.

Joel B.
09-22-2004, 07:51 AM
Bump.......