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Critical Care
09-28-2004, 07:03 PM
Okay, I'm tired of having purple hands, tired of scrubbing hands in gasoline, and tired of trying products that will not touch the primer but will instead remove the top layer of skin.

Anyone have any secrets, like using peanut butter or pickle juice?

Mdirrigation
09-28-2004, 09:09 PM
clear primer

TClawn
09-28-2004, 09:43 PM
clear primer or gloves.

Mark B
09-28-2004, 10:45 PM
I will not use any primer unless the pipe size is over 2". Never had any problems. :D

Critical Care
09-29-2004, 11:52 AM
I haven't run across clear primer - doesn't mean it's not here though. Inspectors tend to look for the purple primer on all of the slip connections, and I think that not using primer at all is asking for problems, no matter what the size of pipe. Needles to say, I'd be worrying if I have 70 psi static or dynamic pressure in a ¾" lateral pipe stuck together without any primer... especially if I had 15 gpm flowing through it. Yikes.

Nevertheless, my hands are still purple.

Crowl-Irrigation
09-29-2004, 12:10 PM
I use a laundry brush in the shower. Comes right off with a good scrubbing.

TClawn
09-29-2004, 03:08 PM
I haven't run across clear primer - doesn't mean it's not here though. Inspectors tend to look for the purple primer on all of the slip connections, and I think that not using primer at all is asking for problems, no matter what the size of pipe. Needles to say, I'd be worrying if I have 70 psi static or dynamic pressure in a ¾" lateral pipe stuck together without any primer... especially if I had 15 gpm flowing through it. Yikes.

Nevertheless, my hands are still purple.

I only put primer on the static lines. I find it easier to just use gloves when I'm doing the static line than scrubbing it off in the shower. for the lateral I just use regular glue, no primer. btw, ONLY do this if your using Christie's red hot blue glue, the other stuff won't hold.

Mdirrigation
09-29-2004, 07:48 PM
I haven't run across clear primer - doesn't mean it's not here though. Inspectors tend to look for the purple primer on all of the slip connections,
.

You have irrigation inspectors ?

Mark B
09-29-2004, 10:38 PM
The only problem I have had is when once I ran out of Oatleys glue and had to buy some cheap thin glue from the local hardware store. I had problems with one of those joints.

Crowl-Irrigation
09-29-2004, 10:41 PM
If you do not use primer 7 to 10 years from now your joints will come loose. Back in the 70's when we did not use primer, joints come loose during repairs now.

jerryrwm
09-30-2004, 01:35 AM
You have irrigation inspectors ?

The plumbing codes require permits be pulled, backflow devices need to be certified, and some parts of the system need to be inspected. Usually only the supply line from the tap to the backflow device. Requirements vary from city to city.

Jerry

Mdirrigation
09-30-2004, 09:03 AM
Jerry, they inspect the backflows here also, I am guessing that that the backflow is on pvc, thats where I was confused , It has to be all copper here .

jerryrwm
09-30-2004, 09:56 AM
There are different codes in different cities here in Texas. Some require PVB to be on Sch 40 PVC, some require it on copper or galvanized. Hell some are just glad you pulled a permit and actually put one in.

Many cities never bother to send out an inspector. If the get the backflow certification paperwork, then they are satisfied. Others just drive by to see the trenches. While other municipalities require you to leave all the ditches open so they can inspect to make sure all the pipe is Sch 40. (That's their rules).

And you dang sure have to remember which city you're working in because every plumbing deptartment has a code comnpliance division that try to interpret the codes as they see fits. Gets to be a regular circus sometimes.

Had one tell me that if I shut the mainline down at the PVB to work on a leak or replace a valve on a commercial property then I needed to have the PVB recertified when I put it back in service. Their reasoning was that if it was shut off and then turned back on there was no way to be sure if it was working without a certification. But they said that we didn't have to recertify a residential system if it was shut down. Figure that one out. Anyway when pressed to show that requirement in any of the codes they said it wasn't necessarily in the codes but it was a good idea. Needless to say everyone recertifies the PVB every time one is worked on here. (Wink, Wink)

Jerry

Critical Care
09-30-2004, 12:48 PM
Jerry, what happens if the city has to work on a water main and shuts off the water supply to a couple hundred commercial customers? Do they all have to get their PVBs checked again?

Inspectors are human; you can find some who are, and some who aren't. Some are on ego trips and will be out there with tape measures making sure you don't bury the DCVA too far down. Or they could say "Hey bud, your unions are on backwards," or "Your pvc labeling isn't pointing up." You can do installs exactly to plan, but at the same time get knocked down because of purple primer, or whatever.

By the way, the city just sent out notices all around saying that you can be cited if you have a pile of bark or gravel in the roadway, even though it's along the curb. You can also get in trouble if you track dirt into the street, or don't have gravel put down for ingess and egress off of unimproved properties. Remember guys, wipe your feet before entering the street!

Were we discussing primer?

Instant Rain
09-30-2004, 06:35 PM
Primer only removes the layer of protective gloss on the surface of the pipe. This helps the glue to solvent weld the pipe and the fitting. You can remove the gloss with sand paper. the problem with that is time and if you miss a spot you may not see it. but you can tell a difference in the way it feels. I use purple primer because it is fast and stains the pipe so you can tell if you missed a spot. laytex gloves will keep your hands clean and they stand up well even to blue glue. i have been told the glue will wipe right off and you can feel what you are working on.

Critical Care
10-02-2004, 01:29 PM
...Just thinking about your comment TClawn about not using primer only on the static lines. I must be missing something because I can't visualize any irrigation line as always remaining static.

It would seem that once a valve is activated then the static pressure becomes dynamic, and once it's dynamic then pipe size, elevation change, and volume become integral factors.

Dwan
10-02-2004, 01:56 PM
Back to the orignal Question
"Okay, I'm tired of having purple hands, tired of scrubbing hands in gasoline, and tired of trying products that will not touch the primer but will instead remove the top layer of skin."
I have tried all sorts of things but what has worked best and works every time is old age, lazyness, and time. Trust me it will be gone in 20 years or so. And if anyone says anything about the purple hands just tell them it is a new fad, or you got it dyeing your wifes hair.

DanaMac
10-02-2004, 02:00 PM
Best way to keep primer off your hands, use poly pipe! :)

When I was installing commercial systems years ago, I would use a very oily hand lotion a few times throughout the day and it helped to keep the glue and primer from really staining my skin. And made easier to get off. I would also rub sand/dirt on my hands immediately after getting glue and primer on them.

DGI
10-02-2004, 07:07 PM
I would also rub sand/dirt on my hands immediately after getting glue and primer on them.


Standard trick for us. We also use latex gloves.

greenwayirrigation
10-03-2004, 01:13 AM
that was a great response to his pickle juice question

I can buy clear primer where I live. I think they might call it clear pcv cleaner. Im no plumber but it all does the same thing doesnt it? Isnt the primer or cleaner just used to remove the the shiney finish and give the pipe texture for the glue to grab to? Like I said Im no plumber, I could be wrong.

DanaMac
10-04-2004, 09:52 AM
This thread is funny. Of all the questions asked in the irrigation forum on product, pricing, technical issues, etc., this one has gotten the most responses.

The irrigation forum on Lawnsite seems like it is the ignored stepchild of the site. But at least we don't get all the same questions asked over and over and over - what kind of blades should I use? what kind of ZTR? how would you price this one acre? blah blah blah. I check the commercial lawn care forum just to read the funny stories about people bitching about all the customers. And to see when bobbygedd is going to blow his top and beat somebody up.

Maybe this is why I enjoy irrigation.

Critical Care
10-04-2004, 10:28 PM
Well, well... little did you know, DanaMac, just how important the purple primer issue was. When you look like you've just climbed out of a vat of concord grapes it becomes downright personal... you know.

Oh, and another thing... Primer stings mighty fierce when it gets into a cut. You guys ever notice that? Kinda like salt on gravel rash. Hmm... you guys with your gloves. I always thought that "real men don't wear gloves."

And you're right Dana about the commercial lawn care forum, but I think there are other forums more akin to being "the ignored stepchild" than this irrigation forum.

jerryrwm
10-04-2004, 11:38 PM
that was a great response to his pickle juice question

I can buy clear primer where I live. I think they might call it clear pcv cleaner. Im no plumber but it all does the same thing doesnt it? Isnt the primer or cleaner just used to remove the the shiney finish and give the pipe texture for the glue to grab to? Like I said Im no plumber, I could be wrong.

Actually cleaner and primer are two different animals.

The cleaner removes the surface glaze and any dirt and oil on the pipe and fitting surface.

The primer actaully begins the solvent welding process by softening the surfaces which then allows the cement to melt the two surfaces together. Clear primer differs in that it doesn't have the coloring agent which was put in to show which peices were ready to be joined, and the dye made it easier for some inspectors to see which joints had been done 'properly'.