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tiedeman
10-06-2004, 12:07 AM
Ok, I live in a small city area where minorities are almost non-existant. Probably less than 1% of the area is of another race, other than Caucasian. Well, finding and keeping workers around here is really hard. Even when you find a good worker they really don't want to work hard at all...very disappointing.

I was thinking of hooking up with the H2B program to bring in some good hard workers that want to work. The problem is that I don't know what the reception would be like in the area. Would I lose customers, would people not call me, etc.

What do you guys think?

Wreak
10-06-2004, 12:13 AM
I'm not sure about up there but down here people would rather a Mexican do the job than anybody else. They are some of the hardest working people I've ever seen. Getting people up in your area to understand this will be very difficult.

HOOLIE
10-06-2004, 12:15 AM
99% Caucasian- who runs your convenience stores up there? :p I don't know what to tell you, don't have that problem around here.

out4now
10-06-2004, 01:01 AM
Ok, I live in a small city area where minorities are almost non-existant. Probably less than 1% of the area is of another race, other than Caucasian. Well, finding and keeping workers around here is really hard. Even when you find a good worker they really don't want to work hard at all...very disappointing.

I was thinking of hooking up with the H2B program to bring in some good hard workers that want to work. The problem is that I don't know what the reception would be like in the area. Would I lose customers, would people not call me, etc.

What do you guys think?

Do it. They're legal to work, no worries, and they put $ back into the economy. As long as they have the papers they need you don't get in trouble and you'll get some good workers.

Up North
10-06-2004, 09:39 AM
Tiedeman, if your area is anything like mine (northern MN) I don't think you'll lose any customers. They may talk about it in the barber shop or at the bakery but I don't think they'll use another LCO just because you have minorities. I personally have worked with some Mexican folks, it was in a different industry, but they seem to be pretty dedicated to their job & the work they do.

Buck

snowdude
10-06-2004, 12:54 PM
you are probably going to have a hard time getting H2B's because you are the one that needs to apply for the visa for that person. To do this you have to prove that this person can do the job better or there is no one in your area that can do the job. Kinda hard to prove with lawn care! I am a Canadian and have been on H2B status in New York for the past 4 years (worked for a large ski area) and there are a ton of hassels with it.
But good luck with it!

Precision
10-06-2004, 02:13 PM
perhaps you can avoid the entire H2B problem by incentivising your work force. I have not had any experience with that in this industry, but I am a trained chef and worked in that field for 10 years in NYC. I always laid out the incentive program for my new hires. They literally earned raises by becoming proficient in certain tasks. I had no problems to speak of and the good people stayed and were happy. Very low turn over in an industry rife with it.

PM me and I will tell you what I am planning to do in this industry.

oneandonlyjojo
10-06-2004, 02:13 PM
mexicans are some of the hardest workers because they cant afford to mess and not get paid. ask any hispanic that wasnt born here guarntee they all have a family back at home that they support from working here.

only one of my houses blatently asked "do you come with a crew" basically she was saying no mexicans

JKOOPERS
10-06-2004, 03:14 PM
in my opinion they do not put money back into our economy they save all the money they make and send it back home. and they dont pay taxes b/c they say they have 20 depedents

Mark McC
10-06-2004, 05:25 PM
in my opinion they do not put money back into our economy they save all the money they make and send it back home. and they dont pay taxes b/c they say they have 20 depedents

Frankly, I doubt whether anyone here has specific numbers on the impact of Latino workers with green cards on the U.S. economy, so this is really a moot point. The only thing we can say for certain is that they fill a need that most of our lazy countrymen won't touch with a ten-foot pole.

What we DO know is that most of them send at least a little cash back home. What's the impact? One might assume that it helps nations with poorly-performing economies (like Mexico's), and the presence of their men and women in our country keeps idle people off the path of some nutso revolution or other.

It educates them about our society and educates us about them. That can't be a bad thing. But sheer economic impact? Betcha money that if you really pressed an economist on this, he or she would have to admit that it's impossible to say with certainty.

By the way, Ronald Reagan once described an economist as someone who sees something working in practice and wonders if it would work in theory. Gotta love that!!!

JKOOPERS
10-06-2004, 05:36 PM
well thats what happened at the company i used to work for . they have 40 of them working and everyone of them did that . they might spend 10-20 percent but the rest is out of here

Mark McC
10-06-2004, 05:54 PM
well thats what happened at the company i used to work for . they have 40 of them working and everyone of them did that . they might spend 10-20 percent but the rest is out of here

I'm not saying the Latino workers in the U.S. don't send most of their money back home, I'm simply saying that it's next to impossible to gauge their impact on the economy. After all, given the aversion most Americans have to manual labor, if we didn't have the Latinos around, we'd be recruiting overseas somewhere, at substantially greater expense. After all, the cost of getting someone here from across the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean would have to come out of someone's pocket, and odds are quite good it'd be the consumer's.

ken50
10-06-2004, 05:56 PM
I am very anxious to see all the responses to this thread. It is exactly what I have been wondering, since I am in a similar situation. Small town, predominantly white, retired, and I have been concerned, bringing Mexicans up here, how it would be received....

tiedeman
10-06-2004, 06:40 PM
I am very anxious to see all the responses to this thread. It is exactly what I have been wondering, since I am in a similar situation. Small town, predominantly white, retired, and I have been concerned, bringing Mexicans up here, how it would be received....

yup that is what I am a worried about, the reception

Bolts Indus.
10-06-2004, 06:53 PM
A wise man said. There is no reality
Perception is reality.

Look to the positive side.

Take advantage of peoples racism and stereotyping.
Sell the job yourself and when your workers show up the customers are going to think you use cheap labor so therefore you have the lowest price.

Perception :rolleyes:

PS: Leave the new truck at home.

a a green
10-06-2004, 09:07 PM
Here where I live we have a lot of chicken plants, and a lot of the production workers are latino. We(my father and I), have a few that work for us, but that is after they get off from the plant. These guys are loyal and the hardest working people I have ever seen. They work 8 to 12 hours in the plant and then come and put in 4 or 5 hours with us, and yes taxes are taken out on them. They also can do a 2 times the work in half the time , so we pay them well. :blob3:

a a green
10-06-2004, 09:14 PM
Oh I am sorry I forgot to mention that they probably spend a lot of that money here, mostly on Beer and They are very religious so I know the church gets some. And they own their own stores for Latino foods and such, so tax money is also getting put back in.... think about it . My grandparents were immigrants, and this is the same thing that they did, work hard to get ahead.

I was just a lucky one and I was born here :D