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View Full Version : a new LCO that needs help with sod job


William Evelsizer
10-16-2004, 04:58 PM
Hi everyone. I am in the first phases of my very own lawncare business. I am currently working on a bid in my neighborhood. The customer has St. Augustine that is starting to overcome his bermuda. ( Sounds familiar huh)
He wants me to lay sod for approx. 3000 sqft. His current LCO is charging .87 per sqft The customer would like to pass the business off to me for the simple fact that I am his neighbor and wants a better price. The job requires tearing up the old grass and I have never done a job like this. What materials do I need, what is the easiest way, how much do I charge, and am i in over my head.

out4now
10-16-2004, 05:20 PM
Can you post some pictures? May help to figure out situation. Probably kill St. Aug. w/non-select herbicide and sod cut, prepare soil, reinstall, but hard to say without more info.

PCLL
10-16-2004, 05:30 PM
I can understand that you're excited to get this job but it may be more than you can handle in terms of doing the job correctly, and the last thing you want is to do something like this and be responsible for screwing it up even worse than it already is. You could always watch the first time and let someone who knows what to do handle this one.

William Evelsizer
10-16-2004, 06:12 PM
Well, I appreciate your comments. After doing some research I found sod for .20 sqft. I can rent a sod cutter for 70 a day. I figure I can cut out the old and spray with and herbacide to kill what might be left over. Then spread some nutrient enriched soil a couple inches thick and lay down the new. It's now our never in my world. I have bills to pay like the rest of you. The customer has accepted my bid at .75 sqft which i believe to be fair for the both of us. How much would a job like this normally go for? Is this fair for me? What kind of trouble might I expect to run into. Also, is there anyone out there that might like to split the job with me.(76092) I figure 50% is better than 0%. Not that I am worried, but could still get alot of value out of working with an expert.

William Evelsizer
10-16-2004, 06:37 PM
Well, I appreciate your comments. After doing some research I found sod for .20 sqft. I can rent a sod cutter for 70 a day. I figure I can cut out the old and spray with and herbacide to kill what might be left over. Then spread some nutrient enriched soil a couple inches thick and lay down the new. It's now our never in my world. I have bills to pay like the rest of you. The customer has accepted my bid at .75 sqft which i believe to be fair for the both of us. How much would a job like this normally go for? Is this fair for me? What kind of trouble might I expect to run into. Also, is there anyone out there that might like to split the job with me.(76092) I figure 50% is better than 0%. Not that I am worried, but could still get alot of value out of working with an expert.

Rwise10230
10-16-2004, 06:40 PM
$17.00 per Square Yard laid.........I'd never do it for less.

PCLL
10-16-2004, 07:05 PM
285/pallet

you really should consider calling an established LCO from the tone of your post. There are plenty of other jobs, profitable jobs, you could find aside from being held liable on this one. Mulching, Straw, or even find someone in your hood in need of a seasonal color change. It sounds entirely too complicated for someone as new as you're claiming to be. I wouldn't touch it with a ten ft pole if I were you. I know if someone called and asked me to supervise, or turned me onto a job I wouldn't think twice about sharing the wealth in return. I apologize for coming off as rude but too many times we have to go back and correct these mistakes and it only costs the customers more money in the long run.

Buggaboo
10-16-2004, 08:14 PM
Nonsense. You already know how to do this job. The only thing you left out that I do is add lime and starter fertilizer which really isn't a must do. Plus it's your neighbor and you'll be able to monitor the progress daily making sure it gets watered enough. Be sure that you get down on your hands and knees and look for any irregular swells in the grading. Once you lay the sod you'll be able to notice any strange bumps that weren't raked over and smoothed out. I took on a huge job this year that I was afraid to do at first. A friend/competitor discouraged me saying he didn't know how I would be able to take it on. My wife gave me a warm nudge in the right direction and after a few learning curves everything fell in to place. I'm so glad I did it. Don't let anyone scare you away from learning something new. Do be sure you buy the sod from a reputable company though. The cheapest is rarely the best and sometimes neither is the most expensive. Go visit the sod farm. These folks want your business and won't mind you wanting to check them out first. If you buy from Buy Sod just know that you're getting one of the most pricey pallets out there and they buy from several different growers. If for some reason you need an extra pallet it may come from a different place and mess up the continuity of your job. And most important of all....GREEN SIDE UP!!!! Good luck!!!