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Frontier-Lawn
10-17-2004, 01:28 PM
my wife wants me to build a raised bed veg garden. what type of water system should i do drip, sprink heads, or soaker hose the size is going to be a L shape 8' on the longest side 4' on the shortest and 4' deep any help would be great. ( :help: i dont need my wife like this :angry: )

JeffY
10-17-2004, 02:32 PM
I would use either drip or soaker hose. Spray heads will encourage leaf rot on some vegetables. I personally prefer soaker hose covered by a thin layer of dirt/mulch if it's all one type of vegetables. Drip would be best if you are using several different types that have different watering needs. You can always had more drip emitters to the plants that need more water than others.

UNISCAPER
10-17-2004, 02:43 PM
We use drip with Rain bird zerogators in 10" boxes under ground, 1/4" tuning connected to above ground micro sprays with ball valves on each nozzle. I love the flexibility of the system, and the ability to move the nozzles simply by pulling the stakes out of the ground and placing them where we need them. In the event some of the gadren is harvested, we can turn the ball valve on any one or all of the nozzles off, so we don't spray that area. Make sure you install a large inline fliter with a 25 psi regulator if you go that route.

earthtool
10-17-2004, 11:41 PM
my wife wants me to build a raised bed veg garden. what type of water system should i do drip, sprink heads, or soaker hose the size is going to be a L shape 8' on the longest side 4' on the shortest and 4' deep any help would be great. ( :help: i dont need my wife like this :angry: )

You might want to take a look at the world leader in low volume irrigation.

Netafim has been in business since the early 60's and is the leader in technology for drip irrigation.
We have been using their products for over 10 years and have had great results.

Hope this helps.

Jim

http://www.netafim.com/index.php3?group=3027&stId=58&action=search&sub=1&searchWords=techline

Critical Care
10-20-2004, 01:00 AM
These guys have given you good advice, and there is also another item that I hope you’re aware of.

Not directly related to irrigation, but directly affecting irrigation is the type of soil that you’re going to have in your raised bed. Drip systems, and soaker hoses, can be used effectively as long as your soil isn’t too sandy. If you take a cup of water and empty it on top of sandy soil where does the water go? It goes down and doesn’t disperse outward very much (bell shaped dispersion). You can end up with some very dry spots only a few inches away from the water source or emitter. But, if you first mix in a good amount of organic matter into your soil, you’ll make out just fine… Your wife and her plants will both be happier.

Frontier-Lawn
10-20-2004, 09:50 AM
i was going to buy bags of the miracle grow topsoil and put in it. the boxes would sit on the sandy soil.

activelandscaping
10-20-2004, 10:50 PM
1) do you have existing irrigation?

2) how much were you planning on spending?

3) do you want this to be automatic ( come on and shut off by means of a timer )?

4) how far is the garden from the nearest hose bib?

Regards,
Active

activelandscaping
10-20-2004, 11:00 PM
i was going to buy bags of the miracle grow topsoil and put in it. the boxes would sit on the sandy soil.

I would be cheaper to buy a farm, and limo to get you there.:D

Just use plain bags of topsoil. Use the following recipe: for every 2 bags of topsoil add 1 bag of manure/compost mix and 2 shovel fulls of sphagnum peat ( 1 bale should do it ). Mix everything throughly along with a little of the sand. I guarantee you it will work better than MG.

Regards,
Active

activelandscaping
10-20-2004, 11:26 PM
my wife wants me to build a raised bed veg garden. what type of water system should i do drip, sprink heads, or soaker hose

I would go with the Rainbird's " Xerigation " line. Run 700 tube from the water source into, then along the back of, the bed. Use pass through, the Grey color, emitters. Attach the micro-tube then go with the " 360 True Spray's " which can be adjusted from closed to 31 GPH , spray diameter from about the size of a dollar to about 3' ( and any size in between). I will post a link when I have time. :)

Regards,
Active

Frontier-Lawn
10-21-2004, 04:23 PM
1) do you have existing irrigation?

2) how much were you planning on spending?

3) do you want this to be automatic ( come on and shut off by means of a timer )?

4) how far is the garden from the nearest hose bib?

Regards,
Active

answer
1) no
2)no more than $500
3)yes i would like it to be
)25'

activelandscaping
10-21-2004, 10:12 PM
You will need the following: Xeri-Pic (http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=27398&stc=1)
1) Female X Female hose bib adapter.$6

2) 100' roll (700 Xeritube) ( smallest it comes in ) $ 12

3) 1 bag Grey pass through emitters. $10

4) 1 bag (100') micro-tube $10

5) 360 micro-sprays $ couple of bucks ea.

6) 2 flush caps ( 1 bib end & one end of run

7) 1800 adapter ( self contained pressure regulator and screen ) 15 bucks

8) just print the pic, take it to
John Deere Landscapes (http://www.johndeerelandscapes.com/storelocator/BullseyePro/search.asp) and tell them " this is what I want to do " could you get me the parts. ( you don't need the hose bib ) :)

I'll finish the instructions tomorrow, getting late now. :sleeping:

Regards,
Active

Frontier-Lawn
10-22-2004, 09:51 AM
cool there is a jdl down the street from me

Critical Care
10-22-2004, 12:25 PM
I would do this slightly different.

I would put one of those common “Y” adapters right on the hose bib. This way you can use leave your garden hose hooked up.

On the other side of the “Y” I would place an inexpensive battery operated clock (controller) to turn on and off the water automatically. It will make life much more easier for you.

From the controller, then go to a filter/regulator. You can find this as a single unit with hose thread on one side and accepting xeritube on the other, or you can put simply attach a regulator onto the filter.

Filter (http://www.rainbird.com/drip/products/control/inline_wye.htm)
Regulator (http://www.rainbird.com/drip/products/control/index.htm)

The last link above also shows a typical filter and regulator connected to a valve. In your case you would connect it to your battery operated controller.

As with any irrigation project, you always end up having to adapt components. Plan on this, and do keep in mind that hose threaded components do not match up to the pipe threaded components unless if you adapt them as Active shows in his pic. You may also want some 90 degree and/or Tee compression fittings for the xeri-tubing. Remember also to hide or bury the xeri-tubing going to the raised bed.

activelandscaping
10-22-2004, 10:24 PM
What Critical Care said, except you will need to place the 1800 retro head in the bed. The pressure regulator should be as close to the beginning of the bed run as possible, otherwise you will experience additional pressure loss from the reg. to the first micro-spray.
Make sure the Y that you buy does not restrict the flow, due to a small orifice size. ( basically get a good Y fitting, not a cheap one ) :)
If you have any further questions post and I will answer ASAP. :)

Best of luck,
Active

Critical Care
10-25-2004, 05:15 PM
The pressure loss at the end of a 100’ run of 700 Xeri-tubing is about 8.9 psi. It sounds like you will have less than 50’ of this and so figure about 4 ½ psi loss. You really don’t have to worry about this amount because most microspray and drip emitters can function well down to 10 – 15 psi. As an example, a bubbler such as the Rainbird UXB-360 at 30 psi has a radius of 1.9 feet, and at 20 psi it has a radius of 1.1 feet. Even with a 30 psi regulator mounted at the hose bib, you would still have more than 25 psi at the end of your run. Just keep your runs of the small ¼” distribution tubing down to a minimum.

Our typical drip system installation consists of the filter and regulator installed below ground in a valve box, often with other valves. It’s not uncommon to have long lengths of tubing, but with different rated regulators we can adapt to whatever the demand is – to a point, of course.

Show us pictures of the raised bed when you get it completed.

jerryrwm
10-25-2004, 11:16 PM
If you are connecting to the house hose bibb, you need to put in a backflow preventer!! A hose bibb vacuum breaker is better than nothing, so at least put one of those on. If you are connecting to an irrigation mainline, hopefully the system has a BFD so you won't need to put one on then.

Jerry

activelandscaping
10-26-2004, 01:46 AM
Upon further consideration I would change the following: Use a separate Y filter, CC-Pic in above post. Mount the Y filter after the " back-flow prevention device ". ( Good catch ):)

Then mount the timer/valve combo to the Y strainer, not the same as a Y flow divider.

Use an in-line 40psi pressure reg ( anywhere you want, but put it in a 6" econo-box for accessibility.

Placing the strainer before the valve/timer will help keep it clean, valves usually fail due to dirt.

All for now. :sleeping:

Best of luck,
Active