PDA

View Full Version : Need actual user opinions on the CAT 236B Skid Steer


thepawnshop
10-18-2004, 06:13 PM
I am seriously considering the Cat 236B and would like to hear from actual users about their satisfaction/dissatisfaction regarding that machine. I will be using the steer for basic construction duties...landscaping, digging out crawlspaces, moving scrap and snow removal. I am also considering the JOhn Deere 320 and the Bobcat S185. Any and all feedback positive or negative would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Doug Brandt
Brandt Custom Homes
Roanoke, VA

Tigerotor77W
10-18-2004, 07:06 PM
I haven't had any experience but strongly suggest you compare more... for lack of a better word, comparable models: the 320 and S185 are vertical lift; the 236B is radual.

You mentioned quite a bit of digging. I would suggest going up to a 246B size machine. This isn't to say the 236B is inadequate; the 246B will simply handle the job more efficiently.

Of the three, I would go with either the Deere or the Cat. I don't believe the S185/175/205/160/150/T190/T180 are big enough of a machine for that size class.

Between Deere and Cat... personally, I'd go with the Cat, but the Deere has a very, very nice ROC and stability going its way. Not to mention enough axle torque to push down the Sears Tower. All considered, however, I think the Cat is the better buy.

thepawnshop
10-18-2004, 07:29 PM
Xing, first let me thank you for the quick response...you are an incredible asset not only to this board, but the "tractorbynet" board as well.


As far as the 246B goes, as I see it, you are only getting 250lbs more ROC and a tipping load of 4,000 versus the 346b which has a tipping load of 3,500. Also the 246b has an additional 8 horsepower, but the rest of the stats including dimensions are identical. Please forgive my ignorance, but based on the 8 additional horsepower and 500 extra pounds of "tipping load" weight, how would that generate much more digging power.


Doug Brandt
Brandt Custom Homes
Roanoke, VA

AL Inc
10-18-2004, 09:05 PM
Doug, I have the 246. I use it for landscaping, moving skids of stone, sod, etc. I also have done a fair amount of digging with it, including some monster tree stumps. I don't have anything bad to say about the machine. My dealer has been great (H.O. Penn here in NY)

Dodgemania
10-18-2004, 09:18 PM
I posted on your other question. I own a 236B. The main thing your going to have on your side is dealer support. I'm not knocking any other machines but the great dealer support I got from Cat opening there doors after hours meeting me on job sites two counties away, and giving me loaners on the spot when mine has had troubles has far exceeded my expectations of them. Other companies may do that but I'd be a little surprised if they do. Big difference in power between A models and B models. Hope that helps

Dodgemania
10-18-2004, 09:21 PM
I don't know what kind of jobs you've tackled but I've been on jobs where I could have used a smaller skid loader. Thats just something to think about.

thepawnshop
10-18-2004, 11:29 PM
Dodgemania I am wondering what you meant by saying that you could have used a smaller skid loader. Were you saying that the 236b was too big for certain jobs? I know it will be impossible to get into 6' openings with the stock wheels, but the dealer said that they have tired made for that application that gives you a bit more clearance. The only time that would be an issue would be like it was on my last house...we had framed the basement wall and still needed to get teh gravel inside and the skid wouldn't fit in the door...what a miserable mistake that I hope will never happen again!

Thanks to all that post and hope to hear from more "Cat" owners. I plan on hitting the local John Deere dealership in the AM to check out their 320 model, though I do seem quite convinced that I am going to end up in the Cat...

Doug Brandt
Brandt Custom Homes
Roanoke, VA

Tigerotor77W
10-19-2004, 01:29 AM
As far as the 246B goes, as I see it, you are only getting 250lbs more ROC and a tipping load of 4,000 versus the 346b which has a tipping load of 3,500. Also the 246b has an additional 8 horsepower, but the rest of the stats including dimensions are identical. Please forgive my ignorance, but based on the 8 additional horsepower and 500 extra pounds of "tipping load" weight, how would that generate much more digging power.

Okay, I get your post now. I was a little confused (it's getting late after a bit of hw) but okay.

And actually, it was I who was mistaken... I'm far too used to Bobcat and Case nomenclature... you are right, the 236B and 246B share the same chassis. :duh: In that case, you might not notice much of a different between the two. However, as the 246B does weigh a little more and does have more horsepower available, you may notice a difference in pushing power. Where the 236B may spin its wheels, the 246B *may* be able to get through. That's pure assumption, of course, but it might be worthy of a demo. The extra 500 lbs. is essentially the weight of the bucket -- that much less of a headache if you're working on a slope.

Your original point is stil valid -- the performance increase of the 246B is essentially only in the engine tweaking. If you have the time to demo a 246B vs. a 236B, I'd recommend it.

Last of all, as a plug for Bobcat (not affiliated at all), the S220 is a large machine that will do great work as well. [That is all.]

Tigerotor77W
10-19-2004, 01:37 AM
My first reply disappeared... :(

Doug -- thanks for your comments. You and ksss both were very gracious in your words, but please keep in mind I am still a student. I have no experience actually diggin' in the dirt so really can't be much help in that matter. I'm trying to get on a skid steer, but until then, I'll have to stick with being a numbers-person (which really doesn't mean much anyhow).

Dodge's point is a good one. Digging garages may necessitate a smaller machine; I know Bobcat offers an "inset wheel rim" option on their machines, and I am sure Cat does as well -- just with a different name. You might consider looking into that. Keep in mind that lateral stability will be affected by a change in width.

The Deere 320 or 317 -- I have yet to be convinced that Deere skids are up to their hype. They have huge engine horsepower and huge breakout force and huge axle torque (heck huge everything) but... if their machines are so much better, you'd assume everyone would just start throwing gargantuan engines and pumps in the machines. Not the case. But go for it -- the Deere probably won't disappoint and the dealer will probably be very eager to sell some skids for a change. Keep in mind that if you do lifting comparisons, the 300 Deeres are vertical lift... you will notice a difference if you try to lift 5,000 pounds. The Deere may well lift it...

I'm attaching a few files for your consideration.

TerraFirma Excavating
10-19-2004, 02:37 PM
thepawnshop,

If you are looking for a skidsteer loader for general construction site duties and are not worried about size constaints, I'd go for the largest, most powerful one you can afford. Then look at the next one up in size and price and see if you can swing the extra money :)

I purchased the 773T (now the S185) for what sounds like the same purposes you are looking for. The machine does great and I use it for everything. I love the vertical lift path and would not own another machine without it. I does somewhat restrict visibility to the sides, but offers better truck loading. I didn't realize how rough the ride was until I used my brother-in-laws 873. Wow, a world of difference. His wheelbase is 48.8" vs. my 40.6". That extra 8" really smooths out the ride in rough terrain. If I had to purchase another skidsteer right now, it's would be the S250, S300, or possible the A300. I see the Cat 246B's wheelbase is 45", so I don't know how this compares with the longer Bobcat's wheelbase for a smoother ride. Rated Operating Capacity, HorsePower, and weight are all important factors, but I think wheelbase is one that is very easily overlooked and is critcal to operator comfort.

Personally, my business is migrating more towards landclearing and prep work of larger areas, so I am looking at a T300 because of the tracks, increased HP, and more hydraulic flow for attachments.

Tigerotor77W
10-19-2004, 03:29 PM
Oooh... now that someone brough up a good thing about Bobcat, here's my change!

There is now a S205 with a 61 hp engine and the same frame as the S175/185/150/160/T190/T180. The wheelbase is rather short, which is why I left out that line, but they're still good, solid machines. Cat's wheelbase is right in between, which is what I wish the S185 line COULD be (along with the S220). The S220 is too long for that size class and the S185 is a little short by market standards. Even so, they are great machines and very capable.

TerraFirma is right on the money with his wheelbase comment. Again, a demo is always welcome and an excellent way to see what your operators like.

Dodgemania
10-19-2004, 09:15 PM
All I'm saying is that if you go with to large of a machine it will be more difficult to maneuver on smaller and tighter jobs. The 236 is in the middle as far as size. The 236B I have does pretty well with digging.

thepawnshop
10-19-2004, 11:06 PM
Well, the CAT rep os meeting me on the jobsite @ 9:30 in the morning to try out the 236B so I will have a better idea whether or not that is the machine for me. The John Deere dealer wnats to bring out their 317 AND 320 for me to demo as well. Funny thing...the BOBCAT dealer didn't mention a demo....

I agree that it is best to get as big a machine as possible, but at the same time, I need to be practical...there may be an occassion where I need to get into one of these basements through a 6' opening and if I go with a larger machine, that won't be possible and that is a big concern of mine.

I am still waiting on the John Deere prices, but so far, CAT is the highest. I asked them if he could budge on the price. He said he couldn't on the machine, but would give me a 1k credit on attachments (bucket & forks are what I am going to buy with the machine initially).

Please, keep all of the feedback coming and I will share scoop from the demo with everyone as well. I have 13 lots with PLENTY of dirt to give this demo a good workout so we shall so how it goes. I have never used the "hand control only" style of controls so wish me luck!

Thanks!

TerraFirma Excavating
10-20-2004, 04:14 AM
If size is a concern, go with the machine that has the most horsepower and hydraulic flow in the size chassis you need. Also, definately drive the large machine and see how well it handles rough terrain. If 90% of your work requires a larger machine and you only need a smaller machine for the odd job, just rent a smaller sized machine as needed and buy big.

Sure price does play into the picture, but also consider availability of attachments to rent and parts & service. For me, the Bobcat dealer has about 4 times the variety of attachments than the Cat dealer. The Deere and Case dealer hardly have any. Sure you can purchase universal attachments, but it sure is nice to rent that $5,000 attachment which you may only need once a year for $100. I know my Bobcat dealer does not rent to Cat owners because (at least what he says) the hydraulic oil is not compatible.

Last summer the Cat dealer was very competitive with his pricing to gain market share. In the compact excavators, Cat was at least $10,000 less than a similar sized Bobcat machine. Make sure the Cat dealer knows he's up against the other machines and he'll most likely find some incentives or rebates.

TerraFirma Excavating
10-20-2004, 04:26 AM
Be sure to also look at machine size and hydraulic flow requirements for attachments you'd like to use. I know I'd like to use larger dozer and snow blades, but my 773 (S185) is a little too light and underpowered. I really wish I had gone up at least one size upon initial purchase to the 864 (now the S220) and had a high flow machine (for a 90" Brushcat).

Also beware that a heavier machine will require a larger trailer and tow vehicle. My loader, 2 buckets, rooter bucket, forks, and Brushcat weigh about 9,000#. A bigger machine would add about 1,000-2,000# to that weight.

Electra_Glide
10-20-2004, 09:51 AM
Pawnshop,

Personally, I like the hand-only controls the best. I've run Cat 242s and 246s as well as a Bobcat 773s, mostly doing clean-up and some backfilling. Directional control on the Cat machines is the same as running a hydrostatic dozer or track loader. I find it much less tiring to run a hand-control machine. Also, the lack of pedals on the floor gives you a little more leg room. Of course, one of the guys I know who has run Bobcats for years absolutely hates the hand-only controls of the Cats.


Joe Kantz

thepawnshop
10-20-2004, 09:53 PM
Well, the weather didn't completely agree with me today...misty the whole day but I got a few good hours in on the 236. I thought I was going to flip her a couple of times but all went well. I do LOVE the hand controls and think they will be tough to beat but tomorrow I am going to be demoing the John Deere 320 with their version of hand controls so we shall see. The verdict is still out but the Deere is coming in a few grand cheaper, which would mean that I could splurge for a couple of extra attachments if I go that route. I have started another thread to try and solicit responses from JD owners to see what their take is on the 320 (old 250 series) skid steer.

Thank you all for taking the time and helping me to make the most and best informed decision. This board rocks!

Tigerotor77W
10-20-2004, 11:29 PM
Seeing as how everything seems to be in good working order... try taking out the S220 for a spin. "Selectable Joystick Controls" (Cat control pattern or Case control pattern -- able to choose) are available for the S220 and larger machines.

In noticing near flips, you realized the biggest weakness to a radial lift machine.

Hope all goes well!

AL Inc
10-21-2004, 12:32 AM
Doug- I demo'd the JD 260 before I bought my Cat. To me, the machine just didn't "feel" smooth. It was just very jerky and I was bouncing around a lot. I was doing some back dragging and the machine was hopping up and down. I imagined being in the machine for 8-10 hours and decided it wasn't for me. There were several things I really liked about the 260, but not enough to buy it. I'm not sure about the upgrades on the new 300 series, so maybe some improvements have been made.
You may want to consider the over the wheel tracks if you are working in very sandy or muddy sites (which I think you are). I got them with the machine and was so happy I did after the WET spring we had here. Well worth the money. Good luck with whatever you choose. Mike

Tigerotor77W
10-21-2004, 01:42 AM
(Deere did do some work on the control system for the new 300 series, yes.)

thepawnshop
10-21-2004, 07:47 PM
OK...so I spent a few hours today on the Deere and then would run the same exact chore on the Cat...and I was much more impressed with the Deere. The visibility is incredible, not just around the cab, but to the bucket as well...in the Cat it was difficult for me to see around the bucket due to the big shroud that Cat has in front. I also noticed that the Cat seemed a bit more willing to "rock", giving you a feeling of the machine tipping over on rough terrain whereas the Deere seemed to handle bumps a bit more forgivingly. The ROC on the Deere is higher as well. As far as the steering mechanism goes, the Cat does win out, but I think the controls can be a bit TOO sensitive. I love them, but I don't think that they alone are reason enough to pay an extra 4k.

I think resale on the Cat would be much better, and if I planned to sell the machine within the next 2-3 years that would play a larger role but I'm not.

I also hear that Cat's service is head levels above everyone elses...but that comes at a price (and a quite large one)...supposedly they are the highest priced service providers around. Here in Roanoke I look at their office and it is HUGE..the John Deere dealer is more of a "mom & pop" type business and I know of at least two other users who have shared with me how well they service and take care of their customers. They offer a "loaner" machine while they service yours if you need and Cat does not.

I REALLY wanted to like, no LOVE the Cat, but at 4k less and seemingly easier to operate in rough terrain (for me at least), I am leaning towards the Deere 320. I still have to demo the Bobcat (if they even offer a demo) before I make my decision, though.

Tigerotor77W
10-22-2004, 12:26 AM
Doug, sounds good to me. Demos really do help out quite a bit. If you go for the Deere, make sure the dealer is reputable and wants your business. (That applies for any company... am I the master of the obvious or what?)

Keep in mind the 236B uses a different lift arm design than does the 320 and the two machines' intended uses are different.

I'll let you be the final decider of what to get. If you go for the Deere, keep posting here because we don't typically hear a lot from Deere owners!

Dodgemania
10-22-2004, 10:51 PM
Hey pawnshop just remember dealer service is a major thing. I own a cat and those guys will drop everything there doing if I have a problem. They've met me out on jobsites a couple counties away. I think all the skidloaders are generally very good. But you might want to take a poll and ask skidloader owner how many times they have to bring it in to the shop. I've got alot of buddies who run skidloaders from Bobcats to Cats to Cases To Gehls to Deeres and they all have mechanical problems some more frequent than others. These machines take alot of abuse out on the job sites. I've just been running a skidloader for the past five months but everybody told me go with the machine that your going to get the best dealer service. I don't know to much about the others but Caterpillar service department has been unbelievable. Anytime I've had problems the've given me a loaner in it's place. That means alot because that skidloader is my main source of income. Just my 2 cents! Like I said earlier all are good machines.

Dodgemania
10-22-2004, 10:56 PM
Hey I don't know if your financing or not but Cat got me at 2.7%. 236B, 6ft rake, 18ft gooseneck. So if everybody else is offering 4,5, or 6% that 4 grand more for the Cat is alot less by the time you pay the loan off. Not very biased am I?

thepawnshop
10-22-2004, 11:35 PM
Dodge, there is nothing at all wrong about being biased...heck, I LOVE the cab of that Cat, I love the controls, I love the pur of her engine. But I found out today from the Cat rep why she rocks so much and the Deere doesn't. Apparently the weight is distributed on all of the Cat machines in a 70/30 split fashion, meaning that 70% of the weight is to the rear and only 30% to the front so when you are running at any kind of speed with an empty bucket, you are going to rock. The John Deere is set up with a 60/40 split (which the Bobcat and I think the New Holland brands sport as well) which cuts down on the rocking.

I haven't pulled the trigger on the Deere yet. Probably the only thing holding me back are the hand controls on the JD...they are incredibly stiff, whereas the Cat controls are smooth as silk. I am told that this is because the JD hand controls are "mechanical", whereas the hand controls on the Cat are hydraulic. Honestly, if I could get the Cat machine for close to the Deere I think I would switch and learn how to live with the weight distribution, but they are 20% apart price wise...as I said before, we are at a 4k difference and I think that may be hard to beat. By the way Dodge, how much did you get your machine for (and which model)?

Here are the specs of what the Deere dealer offered me:

JD 320
Auto Leveling Hydraulics
Hand Controls
Back Up Alarm
72" Construction Bucket
72" Tooth Bar
Forks
$23,500

The same specs from the Cat dealer was $27,500. As far as finance goes, Cat is @ 4.5% for 60 months (with zero down) and John Deere is @ 4/9% (with zero down).

As far as service goes, I don't know anyone here locally that has dealt with Cat, but I do have two friends who are very familiar with the John Deere dealer and have nothing but awesome things to say about them...I guess you could say that they are biased as well. I am positive that Cat service is incredible...it's a Caterpillar so of course it is awesome.

In the perfect world, I could get a machine that had the line of site and drove/rode like the John Deere but had the cab and the controls of the Cat. By the way, I did go by the Bobcat dealer today and test drove a machine (S175) on their lot and I have to say that I was incredibly unimpressed...their hand controls were much smoother than the JD, but whenever I turned it was miserably "jerky"...not at all smooth like the JD or the Cat...that Cat is a smooooth operator... Perhaps there was something wrong with the Bobcat, but the sales guy said that you get used to turning it and that he jerks when he turns as well...that surely didn't get me to change my mind into wanting to buy a Bobcat!

thepawnshop
10-22-2004, 11:51 PM
Dodgemania, I should probably send this directly to you, but your response may help others (myself included) make an educated decision so here goes:

You said you have had your 236b for a while...other than service, which everyone know Cat will never dissapoint in that area, how does it handle for you in rough terrain? The sales rep suggested that I use the throttle lever instead of the gas pedal on rough terrain and I honestly did see a difference, but what observations do you have since you have run this bad boy quite a bit?
I will say that the height scared the crap out of me when I tried pulling it into a garage...I had one measly inch of clearance. Had there been a garage door installed it wouldn't have made it inside. Now I know I may get some flak for parking a skid steer in a garage, but this is in a subdivision I am developing and I want to keep the machine out of the elements as much as possible. By the way, the JD had about 6-7 inches of clearance getting into the garage.

UNISCAPER
10-23-2004, 01:45 AM
As far as Cat service goes, we lost a turbo on our 257B today. I pulled it to the dealer by 12:00 PM, they gave me a 247 to use until ours was done, and by 5:00PM I got a call, and will pick up the machine tomorrow. All items warranteed. We lost 2 production hours, or $350.00, plus cartage. Compared to a Kamatsu we got suckered into a few years back, we saved $27,500.00 on the purchase. However, it lost $134,000.00 in production hoiurs waiting for parts, and we had to lease a machine until it was fixed. So, inessence, we lost over $100K in prodction hours trying to save money. Never again will any rice be spilled on the floor of our shop

Tigerotor77W
10-23-2004, 04:05 PM
A few comments to everyone. I'm not going to doubt or rebuff the idea that Cat service is, overall, absolutely amazing. It's one of the major reasons I want to work for Cat: for the most part, it cares about its customers. However -- fully acknowleding the previous statements -- Deere does have some customers who have changed from Cat to Deere completely, one of the reasons of which was a better attention to the customer than they got from their Cat dealer. As much as Dodge's point is valid, your dealer, Doug, may be different. Just be sure to check it out with contractors in your area. The same goes with Uniscaper's point. Dealer service will vary. Don't be surprised by it.

On a different note: I demo'ed a 236 (not B) yesterday. It has been wet here for about a week so the ground was pretty saturated (meaning if I dug into a pile the tires would spin, not kill the engine), but I couldn't kill the engine on the 236. There was a brand new 262B (0.7 hours!) but its fuel tank was about empty so I didn't get a chance to shove the pile with that one.

Doug, I did notice that the 236 seemed tippy. I was on level ground and raised the boom arms a few times and lowered them; yes, the machine went off rear wheels (a little -- not quite tipping). Keep in mind the 236B has a radial lift... the 320 is both rated higher and has a vertical lift. Combined, these two will offer a serious lifting advantage over the 236B. The 242B, on the other hand, will be a closer match to the 320.

The hand controls are very nice. I'll be the first to admit that I still had many moments of "Wait, which lever does what again?" (yesterday was my first time operating any equipment other than a car), but it wasn't difficult to control the machine at all. I did notice that when running at max RPM (hand throttle), the machine would jerk a lot more when releasing the travel lever. Of course, the machine was a 236 and not a 236B.

Good luck on your decision. I would still go for Cat (maybe not 236B), but take your time and make the decision that you feel will best serve you.

Dodgemania
10-24-2004, 07:20 PM
Pawnshop your exactly right on the height I've got same problem. Deere sounds better in that point. It's all what you feel most comfortable in. As soon as I got in the Cat I knew it was the one for me. As far as the throttle goes I only use the foot throttle except when I'm finish grading. I feel I have more control with the foot throttle. The only down fall I see in it is that it may be a little tall. My main thing is is that I want a machine that I feel most comfortable in, and Cat does that. But if you can go into a Deere and feel more comfortable operating the machine than that is the one I would go with. I tested a few machines and price wise Cat is probable one of the most expensive. That being said I did'nt want to spend 25K for a machine that I wasn't totally happy with, that's kind of why I went with Cat. That's just me if I'm going to buy a truck and the most I want to spend is 30K and I see one I really like better for 34K, than I'm going to spend the 34K. Skidloaders are expensive but if you got to spend a few thousand more on the one your a 100% satisfied with that's what I would do. Alot of people won't take that philosophy and that's good too. Just make sure your a 100% satisfied when you sign the papers.

Dodgemania
10-24-2004, 07:31 PM
To answer your question on rough terrain. I haven't had any problems with rough terrain but I don't go balls to wall on the machine all the time either. I figure I spent a decent amount of money on it so I baby it a times and other times I press it pretty hard.
You said you were a developer, do you plan on running the machine all winter, if you do you might want to look into some over the tire tracks. Makes a world of difference. I was on a pretty big job a couple of months ago and I was basically moving dirt from one side of a house to the other side. "new construction". And all of a sudden a terrible rain storm came up. I continued through a pouring rain for an hour and a half and didn't loose a step as far as traction. If I didn't have those tracks I wouldn't be able to of got back on that job for another three days. Just something to think about.

thepawnshop
10-24-2004, 08:33 PM
Thanks, Dodge...I have already sent an email to Mclaren for info on their tracks...which ones do you use? How much do they cost?

As far as cost goes, I'm the kind of guy that will spend whatever it takes to get the best, but in this instance, there are so many factors in Deere's favor but the Cat is so sweet it is making pulling the trigger hard for me. Just as an example...today I go to the jobsite and fire up the Cat...she purred like a kitten. I then walk over to the Deere and she sputters and coughs several times before coming to life. I guess in the perfect world I would have the John Deere frame and weight distribution and have the cat cabin and controls...now that would be a perfect machine...

Dodgemania
10-24-2004, 11:41 PM
I went with the steel Loegering tracks because they will last quite awhile. I believe the cost of the were 2100. I think! It's usually good to have an extra pair of hands putting them on and taking them off. Two people you can take them off or put them on in about 10 to 15 min. On picking your machine go with the one that is best for you.!

fencebuilder726
09-11-2010, 08:03 PM
I am seriously considering the Cat 236B and would like to hear from actual users about their satisfaction/dissatisfaction regarding that machine. I will be using the steer for basic construction duties...landscaping, digging out crawlspaces, moving scrap and snow removal. I am also considering the JOhn Deere 320 and the Bobcat S185. Any and all feedback positive or negative would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Doug Brandt
Brandt Custom Homes
Roanoke, VA

After Endless hours of searching i found the one that fit and it was the 236B, I am just having to figure out what all the buttons mean, it is my second skid steer, i had a john deere, which was great, but the pilot controls are awesome! if anyone can direct me to a site where i can figure out what the buttons in the cab mean, please inform me! Thank you and have a great day!

bobcat_ron
09-11-2010, 10:46 PM
After Endless hours of searching i found the one that fit and it was the 236B, I am just having to figure out what all the buttons mean, it is my second skid steer, i had a john deere, which was great, but the pilot controls are awesome! if anyone can direct me to a site where i can figure out what the buttons in the cab mean, please inform me! Thank you and have a great day!

Which buttons do you need help with?

236 is a nice machine, I rented one twice last year, lots of power.

fencebuilder726
09-11-2010, 10:57 PM
Which buttons do you need help with?

236 is a nice machine, I rented one twice last year, lots of power.

first of all bobcat_ron thank you for your expedient response! The two buttons on the left side(top left) one has a red hold switch, i assume that is to cut off power to the auxilaries, but i dont know, and second is one that looks like a lightning bolt(not exact but similiar) and the third is top right that has something on it that looks like an upside down T thank you very much, i am a firefighter in ada, so i cant look at you tube (they have it blocked). but any help will be greatly appreciated!

Again thanks for your help:usflag:

bobcat_ron
09-11-2010, 11:12 PM
first of all bobcat_ron thank you for your expedient response! The two buttons on the left side(top left) one has a red hold switch, i assume that is to cut off power to the auxilaries, but i dont know, and second is one that looks like a lightning bolt(not exact but similiar) and the third is top right that has something on it that looks like an upside down T thank you very much, i am a firefighter in ada, so i cant look at you tube (they have it blocked). but any help will be greatly appreciated!

Again thanks for your help:usflag:

The one with the red lock out is to release the pressure in the hydraulics with the engine shut off and key turned on, when you need to hook up or take off a hammer for example, the second one is to activate the electric system for the harness wire Cat uses for multi-functions that require oil flow like a dozer blade where it uses solenoid valves to control smaller cylinders for angle and tilt.
If you have a plug and wire on the loader on the left side, then you have the work tool harness kit installed.

bobcat_ron
09-11-2010, 11:14 PM
The third one is a mystery, upside down "T", I had that one too in my 247, but it did nothing, maybe it was an over ride for something?

fencebuilder726
09-11-2010, 11:20 PM
The one with the red lock out is to release the pressure in the hydraulics with the engine shut off and key turned on, when you need to hook up or take off a hammer for example, the second one is to activate the electric system for the harness wire Cat uses for multi-functions that require oil flow like a dozer blade where it uses solenoid valves to control smaller cylinders for angle and tilt.
If you have a plug and wire on the loader on the left side, then you have the work tool harness kit installed.

thank you very much for your info, I am glad there are people out there like you, to help novice equipment operators like myself, that helps me out alot, I will be definately checking back with more questions and input from my machine, so far I love this machine and wouldnt trade it for the world, I bought it from a local rental store, it has 1700hrs with a bucket forks and hydraulic auger attatchment, i bought it for $17000 I think that was a good deal considering i couldnt find one even close to the price anywhere(they were more expensive even with more hours) and i know the people that own the store, they own 4 across oklahoma, and are locally based! They service there equipment to the fullest.


Then i asked myself " why so cheap" well they are replacing all of there cat inventory with the new kubota that is coming out, because they are a dealer and it makes sense, because if one rents, one will buy if they like. I guess the next question i have is, Do you think that was a good deal? It is a straight machine, has a few scratches, but nothing major, and everything works on it, including all of the lights! And i do have the electric package on as well. Thank you for your help Ron it absolutely pays to have forums such as this, and i am very thankful.

fencebuilder726
09-11-2010, 11:22 PM
The third one is a mystery, upside down "T", I had that one too in my 247, but it did nothing, maybe it was an over ride for something?

It actually does say override now that you mention it. But override for what i wonder?

bobcat_ron
09-12-2010, 10:46 AM
It actually does say override now that you mention it. But override for what i wonder?

Push the button and see what happens, if the machine starts to shake and vibrate, get out and start throwing rocks at it.

nepatsfan
09-12-2010, 11:08 AM
Push the button and see what happens, if the machine starts to shake and vibrate, get out and start throwing rocks at it.

I am pretty sure its an override for the self leveling bucket. I have a 226 but its proabably the same thing. I have the manual I will check it out. I am almost positive that's what it is though.