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stxkyboy
10-31-2004, 06:51 PM
I have heard that you are never supposed to use shears on taxis because it creates a dense outer layer killing off inner growth leaving an ugly bush within years. Not many people i know follow this and use only hand pruners just wondering if you had heard this and or follow it

BCSteel
10-31-2004, 07:51 PM
I only see densiforum out here mostly. I use the hedge trimmers on them all the time.

Coffeecraver
11-01-2004, 05:16 AM
Prune yews (Taxus) in late March. Cut back to green shoots.
Taxus can be cut back as much as 50% and still make a strong recovery.
Yew (Taxus species) can tolerate more severe pruning than most evergreens.

Hand pruning may be desired for a more informal look,but hedge shears
will not hurt the plant,just give it a different look.

GroundKprs
11-01-2004, 05:21 AM
Repeatedly shearing any plant, not just taxus, will give you a dense outer layer of foilage, with a bare inside.

Also, when shearing, most people attempt to take off the same amount all over the plant. They do not compensate for the heavy growth on top, which gets more sunlight. So in time most sheared plants wind up vase shaped, with sparse bottoms and sides and heavy tops - a bundle of sticks with a green hat, LOL. Hedge trimmers are used on most landscape plants out of ignorance of proper pruning techniques. If one wants boxes, balls or pyramids, why not just buy plastic shapes and paint them green? Would save a lot of work, LOL.

Hedge trimmers are for HEDGES - note the name of the tool. A hedge is a living fence, as along a property line or border. Even hedges should be thinned every few years by pruning, to allow light inside and along the sides.

Coffeecraver
11-01-2004, 05:57 AM
Repeatedly shearing any plant, not just taxus, will give you a dense outer layer of foilage, with a bare inside.

Also, when shearing, most people attempt to take off the same amount all over the plant. They do not compensate for the heavy growth on top, which gets more sunlight. So in time most sheared plants wind up vase shaped, with sparse bottoms and sides and heavy tops - a bundle of sticks with a green hat, LOL. Hedge trimmers are used on most landscape plants out of ignorance of proper pruning techniques. If one wants boxes, balls or pyramids, why not just buy plastic shapes and paint them green? Would save a lot of work, LOL.

Hedge trimmers are for HEDGES - note the name of the tool. A hedge is a living fence, as along a property line or border. Even hedges should be thinned every few years by pruning, to allow light inside and along the sides.

These blanket statements are not based upon everyone's experience.

"Also, when shearing, most people attempt to take off the same amount all
over the plant."

Not all people
Most people I know will trim what needs it and leave the rest alone

" Hedge trimmers are used on most landscape plants out of ignorance
of proper pruning techniques."

Hedge trimmers are also used on most all shrubs with skill and
knowledge of proper pruning techniques.Depends on who and what you know

Hedge trimmers are for HEDGES - note the name of the tool. A hedge is a
living fence, as along a property line or border.

Is there a law that I did not hear about?
Pull your head out of the books long enough to gain some experience.

:rolleyes:

BCSteel
11-01-2004, 09:43 AM
I am well aware of the "proper" methods of pruning but I will do the work that I am getting paid for which is not hand pruning acres of shrubs. When the time comes that I can charge 5x or 6x the going rate, then I will do my pruning the "book" way. Until then, my customers will continue to enjoy beautiful landscapes and affordable costs.

Evan528
11-01-2004, 09:58 AM
I also am aware of the proper pruning techniques but choose not to always follow. I and most of my clients prefer the well manicured look only a hedge trimmer can provide for a shrub. I know the inside will brown out....but who cares if you cant see it anyway. I wouldnt have many clients willing to pay my fees for hand pruning all of there shrubs twice a year will felcos nor do I have the time.

Island Lawn
11-01-2004, 11:06 AM
For the health of the plant, most regularly sheared shrubs need renovational pruning every year or two.

It is certainly not standard practice in my area, too say the least.
Academic Horticulture seems to be a common victim to Standard Business Practices.
:blush:

It's a simple choice.

I suppose one could make flyer to educate the customer and offer renovational pruning as a very expensive "extra" service.
payup

Or

Just "cut and run" like the lawn scrubs and replace the shrub for big bucks after you weaken and kill it.
payup

To be fair, Academics kill shrubs too!
:alien: