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RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 09:49 AM
Hello all, GO BUSH on this fine tuesday. Anyhow, im 16, i have my own lawncare and landscaping business, i manage anywhere from 35-50 lawns a week depending on growth. but obvisouly the season is coming to an end....

Anyways, im 16, a junior in HS, and im thinking about doing landscaping/lawncare for a career and being sucessful in this business, sense im 16, in about 10yrs my name would be out their for a while and i would be a reputable company.... but ive always wanted to be a police officer. Anyways, what would you guys reccommend? I was talking with my brother and a few of his freinds who are in thier late 20's, and they've told me that alot of police officers get sued, that Criminals have more rights than officers and it'll be worse if kerry takes over, and that i would be a bad officer because im so hot headed that i would probably end up beating the crap out of people when they be a smartass, and get sued. lol. anyway, is any of this true? Im thinking about being a Grosse Pointe, Saint Claire Shores, or Sterling Heights Cop, but the thing with those is that on top of being an officer you have to be an EMT or Fire person, something with Public Saftey? And the acedmey is pretty difficult because you have to be a officer and a fire fighter or emt too. Or, the other option is to be a detroit cop for 3 years and then transfer to be one of those cops in the above 3 citys. I was also told that in the one of the grosse pointes, their were 150 accplicants and only 3 got the job, but then again the GP officers make 100k, same with sterling heights, and around 70 for SCS. Then I was thinking of being a state trooper, but then i was told that the acedemy is extremly hard. But do they make good money?

Anyways, what im asking, what would you guys reccommend? How do you guys manage the lawncare/landscaping business along with being an officer. And is the stuff true, as far as getting sued, criminals having more rights than officers, and if Kerry gets elected officers along with white people will have less rights?

Im just trying to figure out what i want to do for a career. Thanks for reading this post and thanks in advandce.

geogunn
11-02-2004, 12:42 PM
premier--why do you want to be a cop?

an honest answer to this would be helpful to those that might respond.

GEO

alpine692003
11-02-2004, 12:44 PM
What might help you is this forum, I too want to become a police officer.

www.911jobforums.com

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 01:06 PM
premier--why do you want to be a cop?

an honest answer to this would be helpful to those that might respond.

GEO

im not really quite sure, ive just really liked it, and recently ive just been looking into other options. i like landscaping and all, but i like the idea of ALWAYS getting a paycheck, whereas with the landscaping and whatnot there are slowmonths... i was also thinking, being a cop, saving money to open up a landscaping business with good equipment, truck, etc. like be a cop, save money so i cant get all new equipment, then when im 30 open up the landscaping part and see how that goes and possibly not be a cop anymore. im not really sure what i want to do, im just looking at other possibilitys. Another possibility would be going into the army, not sure what i would do after. Then i was thinking about being a teacher, but i dont think i would want to deal with kids.

Or i could just stick with my original plan, stay in the business, finish up HS, then go to MSU for college for something in business and horticulture, and have someone else run my business while im at MSU, then when i graduate ill have all the knowladge to expand the business that much more.

But, basically, i always wanted to be a cop? why you ask? im not sure. i just like the action, i like giving back to people and always liked that idea of being a cop.

Shuter
11-02-2004, 01:16 PM
You should become a firefighter instead.

pwarren4
11-02-2004, 01:39 PM
One recommendation I have for your near future:

Don't miss any English/Lit/Writing classes.

:waving:

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 01:39 PM
whys that? i really wouldnt want to. i wouldnt want to be in that kind of heat. ya in GP, SCS, and Sterling heights you have to be either an EMT or Firefighter ontop of a cop, but what are the odds you would have to use it?

chevyman1
11-02-2004, 01:47 PM
whys that? i really wouldnt want to. i wouldnt want to be in that kind of heat. ya in GP, SCS, and Sterling heights you have to be either an EMT or Firefighter ontop of a cop, but what are the odds you would have to use it?


what are the odds you would have to use those professional services? Mark, stay in school buddy, you have a lot of work to do. Chalk your mistakes up to being naive

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 01:48 PM
ya in GP, SCS, and Sterling heights you have to be either an EMT or Firefighter ontop of a cop, but what are the odds you would have to use it?

DAILY...Duh that's why they are called Public Safety Officers instead of just police officers :dizzy:

Also that thing about those town's officers making a $100K a year......NOT!!

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 01:51 PM
DAILY...Duh that's why they are called Public Safety Officers instead of just police officers :dizzy:

Also that thing about those town's officers making a $100K a year......NOT!!

idk, because their a few people in my school whos fathers are PSO's and they live in 200-300k homes, pay high taxes, and they have kids, and the moms stay at home.

well the thing i said about the heat, i wouldnt mind that, its just you dont know what you might find in the burning object.

i would like to be a PSO but again, i heard criminals have more rights than officers, and alot get sued, plus im hot headed.

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 01:59 PM
PremierLandscapingidk, because their a few people in my school whos fathers are PSO's and they live in 200-300k homes, pay high taxes, and they have kids, and the moms stay at home.

<b>That's doesn't mean anything other than they are in debt</b>


and alot get sued, plus im hot headed.


<b> Well, i realize that you are only 16, but once you get a real good @ss Whooping you'll lose that hotheadness, cause remember no matter how "bad" one thinks they are, there is ALWAYS someone out there "badder"</b>[/QUOTE]

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 02:05 PM
i see what your saying. when i say hot headed. i dont mean like i think i can whoop ass, because i CANT. my definition of hot headed is i get upset easy, and when i do, i go crazy... maybe i was using hot headed in the wrong terms?

KERRTURF
11-02-2004, 02:21 PM
As of August of this past year, I have been a full time Police officer for 17 years. I have worked in all patrol divisions, the Detective Bureau, negotiator for the SWAT team, and several other assignments. I mention this to you not to brag about any so called accomplishments, but rather to show you that I am experienced, and well seasoned in this line of work.
A couple of things about your original post concerned me. Please do not take this the wrong way, I am honestly trying to help you.
#1) You are 16 yoa, take this time of your life to find out what you are really qualified to do. Do some soul searching, and figure out what it really is that makes law enforcement attractive to you. Trust me when I say this.. Every day is NOT like you see on COPS. 90% boredom, and about 10% sheer terror pretty much sums it up. The job requires the ability to be everything from a therapist to an attorney, to an executioner. All of this being said, the job is not exciting all of the time. Depending on where you find your jurisdiction, you will find that you handle the same type of calls quite often. I work in a medium sized city with a fairly large college within it. I am so sick of drunk kids and bar fights, that if I ever see another drunk again it will be to soon.
#2) STAY IN SCHOOL. Don't get in such a hurry that you don't finish a college degree. Even if you can find an agency that will hire you w/o a degree, you will need one to move up in rank.
#3) (and the most important) If you realize that you are a "hot head" do yourself a favor, and choose another line of work. The department, and the citizenry will not accept an out of control temper in these times of civil liability claims
True, it does seem as if the criminals have more rights at times than you do. The bottom line though is that there are rules, policies, and procedures in place to protect you and the department from civil or vicarious liability. I've got 9 more years to go, I really don't want another rookie coming into the job making it harder for everybody else because he is over zealous.
I like my job, and it has been very good to me and my family, but it simply isn't as glamorous as you see on TV. Consider going to the academy (currently about $3000 in OH) and try a part time or reserve commission for the time being until you see if this is something that you want to do.
Again, please don't take this as bashing you. The fact that you are honest about your temper, and are asking questions says a lot about your character.
Please feel free to PM if you have any other questions. And by the way, I am working in NE Ohio, and I can tell you that no starting patrol officer is making anywhere near those salary numbers around here!
Sorry about the long post! ;)

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 02:31 PM
Thank you very much for informing me about this. I figured its not always exciting. And i also often think, it is pretty scary, for instance, if you pull someone over in a bad neighborhood, ask them for their lisence and they say their wallet is in their glovebox... who knows what they'll pull out.

but thanks for informing me. I do not in anyway take it as bashing me, just simply informing me, and i thank you for that.

JimLewis
11-02-2004, 02:47 PM
Premier,

I am not a police officer. But my best friend and bro-in-law are. I have spent a lot of time with them - both on and off the job. Neither of them have lawn care businesses on the side so I can't help you with that but there are some other insights I can help you with.

First of all, the lawsuits thing is fairly true. The larger the city you work for, it seems the more likely you are to be sued. My best friend has 2 lawsuits against him now and already won a few others that he used to have against him. Cops usually win but it doesn't stop people from trying to pursue them legally. It's not really the cop they are after - it's the money that the agency has - that they want. My brother, on the other hand, has never been sued. But he works in a smaller county out in the country with a small population.

The job itself can be a blast. The adreniline rush is amazing. The job is rewarding. And all cops I know are extremely fair to people. It's definitely a job that keeps you excited the entire time. As far as you loosing your cool on people, I wouldn't worry about that. I bet by the time you graduate from college and the academyand entered the police force you'd be a little more in control of your emotions by that point.

The downside of being a police officer is that it can eventually get to you. It depends on where you live, what your beat is, etc. But you are subjected to lots of nasty stuff on a regular basis. You see bloody accidents, wifes and kids who have been beaten, people strung out on drugs, murders, suicides, etc. I witnessed a suicide on a ride along recently with my bro-in-law. He saw 3 suicides inside of a 2 week period. One happened right before our eyes. Another, he found a guy he knew personally hanging in his garage, and I can't remember the details of the other one. But that really threw him over the edge and he decided to quit and find another job. So I should clarify my statement above; my bro-in-law WAS a police officer until very recently.

The other downside is the pay isn't that great.

On the other hand, my best friend loves his job. He sees some gruesome stuff sometimes. But not too often, because we live in a county with a very low crime rate and so it's more calm here. He will probably stay at his job his entire life.

I do know that my bro-in-law was able to work another job on the side. In addition to being a cop for many years, he was also an auctioneer part time. And that part time job brought in as much $$ per year as his cop job did. And he was a Seargent.

Knowing what I know and seeing what I've seen, my advice would be this; be a LCO full time and you can always work on the police force part time in the "reserves". Most departments have reserve positions open. You still get to carry a gun and do the normal duties of a police officer, but it's not a full time deal. That's one good option for you.

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 02:54 PM
okie doke. thanks mr. lewis for helping me understand it more. Thanks again!

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 03:11 PM
Kerrturf has given you some very good advice and made very true statements to you in doing so. I assure you as he said 90% of the work is pure boredom. As to getting sued, yes that is always a possiblity and happens more offen than it did say 15 years ago, BUT in reality it is still not very likely to happen to the average officer. Even if it does you are insured through the department as long as you were acting in your official duty. An officer who is constantly getting sued though is doing something wrong on his end or is way over aggressive and really needs to be looked at hard by the department brass. Most officers go through their entire career without 1) ever being sued and 2) ever firing their weapon in the line of duty. However, it is the real world out there and they also though have to hand out and are handed out a ton of butt whoopings and as kerr said deal with some of the worst society has to offer in some cases.

Why and how do I know this? Because I was an officer for 20 years, started as a foot patrol officer and retired as a Police Chief. Even witnessed in 2003 after I had retired the Execution of a murderer I had put on death row back in 1985.

Also you will not make a lot of money until/unless you get really high in the ranks and that will also require a college degree in nearly every case anyway. I never really started making any money to amount to much until I made Lieutenant even with my college degree.

Now, your question. Would I do it again? Nope, as it is a totally thankless job.

Stay in school, get all the education you can and you have plently of time at only 16 to figure out where to go in life.

Littleriver1
11-02-2004, 03:11 PM
I don't think criminals have more rights than officers. Officers have to play by the rules, criminals don't, thats why their criminals. I would think being a police officer is much more dangerous than a fire person or EMT. If being a police officer is your passion then the money isn't going to matter to you. Stay in school and get a degree. People with a degree make 70% more money in their life time. If you want to make more money in your lifes work stay in school. Your thinking about all the money you can make in your business "now". It's a drop in the bucket compaired to what is out there waiting for you. Once you start working you will never stop. You will be working for the rest of your life. With life stiles being what they are today, you may be working for 70 or 80 years. Why in hell would anyone want to do that? Don't worry about John Kerry being pres. I've lived long enough to see a bunch of stupid people live in the White House. In the end, nothing changes. We work hard, send them our money and they spend it like it is theirs. But, in the end you will do what ever you want any way. Just enjoy every minute of it, because it goes really fast. Life has got to be the fastest form of entertainment known to man.

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 03:16 PM
thanks guys to replying. im not really to concerned with the salary, i just like the secureness of a paycheck, and not having to worry about getting work that month or not. Plus I always liked the idea of an officer. Like i said, im not to concerned with the pay, as long as its enough to live in a decent home, not in detroit, and plus dont cops get awsome benifits? and as far as the boredem goes, doesnt that happen with ANY job after a while?

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 03:44 PM
Yes, Mark the benefits are outstanding for the job as far as retirement, Insurance, time off, etc. Remember the down side is every single time you walk out the door to go to work could be your last time and while many will say that of many other jobs too, it is not in most of the other cases as a direct result of the danger of the actions of others that can cause that death or serious injury.

When you get older do some "ride alongs" and get a feel for the job as most depts now allow that. Remember also you still have plenty of time as you must be at least 21 to be an officer in nearly every state.

KERRTURF
11-02-2004, 03:56 PM
My benefits are very good, but like every one else in the country they are starting to erode. Don't forget also that the job comes with extra "baggage". Not being at home when you are needed, not being able to see the kids at school events and holidays because you have to work, emergency call outs, etc. Then there is the emotional "baggage"... I was stabbed in May of '89 during a riot, and one week from today marks the second year anniversary of a guy that we ended up killing after a 10 hour standoff. Anybody who will tell you that they can drop the hammer on another human being without feeling the long term affects of it is either a real sick SOB, or completely demented. Again, I like my job, but as MMLAWN said I would probably not do it again.

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 04:08 PM
Yeah, my partner when I was working drugs and I shot and killed a drug dealer in 1984 around 1AM on a lightly rainy pitch black night in a traffic stop and I can still feel the rain hitting me in the face sometimes as I see his body lying there in the ditch dead. Did he deserve to die, yep, but that doesn't mean you ever forget it.

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 04:28 PM
I think that is also why I get a kick out of reading some of the gun threads on here. Now don't get me wrong, I've pulled the trigger and I'd pull it again in the right circumstances and without hesitation, but some of these rah, rah gun guys that make the post about gun this and gun that and carrying a gun to cut grass but have never even pointed a real gun at a real person in a real life or death situation with the intent to use it just kills me (no pun inteaded, lol) as they have no idea.

geogunn
11-02-2004, 04:43 PM
........but some of these rah, rah gun guys that make the post about gun this and gun that and carrying a gun to cut grass but have never even pointed a real gun at a real person in a real life or death situation with the intent to use it just kills me (no pun inteaded, lol) as they have no idea.

is this a trick question?

GEO :waving:

quickcuts
11-02-2004, 04:45 PM
Mark, you talk about being a fireman is a bad thing. I have been a volunteer for a few years now, and you only "feel the heat" 10 out of 100 calls. 90% of what you do is ems type work. So being and EMT/FF is not all bad. Those towns you mentioned probably want their personell to be and EMT/FF because of how it would affect stuff on the scene. If you were just Joe Schmoe cop and you pulled up to a pretty nasty car wreck and didn't know what to do, that would suck. If you were an EMT/FF you could grab your ems bag and get to work. Honestly, EMT/FF's have more fun anyways. Ask any cop.

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 04:48 PM
Honestly, EMT/FF's have more fun anyways. Ask any cop.



Yeah right! ;)

There was a reason we use to describe beinga cop as the kinda job that, where else can you shoot at people and beat on them and get paid to do it? LOL :cool2:

Before someone blast Cops keep in mind this was also a joke. :p

MMLawn
11-02-2004, 04:51 PM
is this a trick question? GEO :waving:

Didn't realize it was a question at all. Why are you one of those guys? :waving:

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 05:05 PM
Mark, you talk about being a fireman is a bad thing.

i dont feel that it is a bad thing at all, i just feel that it is more dangerous position. but again, i guess im wrong. My uncle was a firefighter for a long long time, maybe ill talk to him about it. (i dont see him much).

Anyhow, thanks guys, youve really brought some insight to this aspect. Thanks again.

pilotcoplawnboy
11-02-2004, 05:26 PM
I've read the other post and will give you my 2 cents. I have been a police officer for about 11 years now. I have been mowing grass for about 24 years. I started mowing when I was in the fourth grading with my father. When I was in High School I wanted to join the Air force and become a pilot. Thanks to a lacerated Achilles tendon in the 12th grade I had to give up the pilot dream.(I had to pay for the license myself with my grass cutting money) I decided I was gonna go to college and get a degree in Criminal Justice and work toward becoming a police officer. The whole time I was in college I mowed grass for my father so I wouldn't have to get a real job. Shortly after finishing college I applied for the local police department and got accepted. As a result of being a rookie I had to work the midnight shift for several years. This was good for me because it allowed me to still work with my father during the day. After several years of doing this I moved to the neighboring county and got married. Now I mow several yards in my county and also help my father as time permits. I now work in the traffic unit within my department and loving every minute of it. The hardest part for me was when I had to go to 3 months of Crash Reconstruction Schools which left me mowing a lot of yards on the weekends. Fortunately for me I worked 7 at night until three in the morning. This allows me to mow during the morning hours when it's not to hot outside. You will not be rich as an officer but you can always count on job security as long as you don't mess up on the job. I am in it for the security and retirement benefits. Good Luck! Please let me know if you have any questions.

Shadowroll
11-02-2004, 07:14 PM
idk, because their a few people in my school whos fathers are PSO's and they live in 200-300k homes, pay high taxes, and they have kids, and the moms stay at home.

.

Is this one of the kids fathers in those $300,000 homes? (http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/3883488/detail.html)
Guy I played baseball with growing up works for the local Police, just built a $350,000 home a few blocks over from me. Real nice place he has...how can he afford it? His wife is a Doctor :p

Locally over the years a lot of the city Police have jumped ship to the FIRE department when opens came up. Same pay and only work two 24 hour shifts a week and you don't have to put up with IDIOTS everyday.

Hacksquat
11-02-2004, 07:31 PM
I've been an Arkansas State Trooper for 10 years. I started my own lawn care business four months ago. As a fluke, I signed up for Military Police when joining the Army. I say fluke because I picked the MOS (Military Occupational Skill) from a MOS book, which had a Marine MP standing over the hood of a car with a radar gun. I thought that looks cool. Since then, law enforcement has been in my blood. Like others have said, continue with your education. It took me three years to get on with the ASP. But, my college education helped me pass other applicants. Do you need a degree to work in law enforcement? I think not. It's common sense. But, anything to give you the edge over the next guy trying for the same job helps. The pay isn't the greatest. I've worked extra jobs ever since I've been in law enforcement. Which, is one reason I started my own lawn care business. The benefits are good. But, they are getting watered down like everything else. I LOVE my job! I LOVE going to work. As mentioned before, it's not all action. Law enforcement has a lot of rewards. Some may think this is bs, but you really get to help people. Sure, you have some bad police officers out there. I've seen them. But, like any job you're going to have bad apples.
In closing, good luck, and don't give up. You're still young. Remember, you can do anything that you put your mind to.
HackSquat

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 07:35 PM
Locally over the years a lot of the city Police have jumped ship to the FIRE department when opens came up. Same pay and only work two 24 hour shifts a week and you don't have to put up with IDIOTS everyday.

i was not aware of that... ill have to second think that option!

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 07:37 PM
I've been an Arkansas State Trooper for 10 years. I started my own lawn care business four months ago. As a fluke, I signed up for Military Police when joining the Army. I say fluke because I picked the MOS (Military Occupational Skill) from a MOS book, which had a Marine MP standing over the hood of a car with a radar gun. I thought that looks cool. Since then, law enforcement has been in my blood. Like others have said, continue with your education. It took me three years to get on with the ASP. But, my college education helped me pass other applicants. Do you need a degree to work in law enforcement? I think not. It's common sense. But, anything to give you the edge over the next guy trying for the same job helps. The pay isn't the greatest. I've worked extra jobs ever since I've been in law enforcement. Which, is one reason I started my own lawn care business. The benefits are good. But, they are getting watered down like everything else. I LOVE my job! I LOVE going to work. As mentioned before, it's not all action. Law enforcement has a lot of rewards. Some may think this is bs, but you really get to help people. Sure, you have some bad police officers out there. I've seen them. But, like any job you're going to have bad apples.
In closing, good luck, and don't give up. You're still young. Remember, you can do anything that you put your mind to.
HackSquat


ahh thanks for the additional knowledge!

all degree
11-02-2004, 07:46 PM
My opinion is no matter what you do go to college if you have the option. Not only will you learn things but you will get the opportunity to meet people that you would not otherwise have met.

If you go to MSU you will meet people from all over the world and be able to gain from their views. After college you can do anything you want, including becoming a police officer, and get paid more. I had a blast in college and it has opened up some doors for me. College is not a guarantee of success and you know by reading about people here...lots of guys doing well with no college.

It sounds to me like you have a pretty well off family that could send you and if you have that many accounts could save some money to make it easier on them.

Go to school you will find there are options that you never thought of once you get there. And you will probabally hook up with tons of chicks.

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 07:59 PM
My opinion is no matter what you do go to college if you have the option. Not only will you learn things but you will get the opportunity to meet people that you would not otherwise have met.

If you go to MSU you will meet people from all over the world and be able to gain from their views. After college you can do anything you want, including becoming a police officer, and get paid more. I had a blast in college and it has opened up some doors for me. College is not a guarantee of success and you know by reading about people here...lots of guys doing well with no college.

It sounds to me like you have a pretty well off family that could send you and if you have that many accounts could save some money to make it easier on them.

Go to school you will find there are options that you never thought of once you get there. And you will probabally hook up with tons of chicks.

ya thats what my father has told me, hes a superintendent for a local school district. along with helping of making the ACT and SAT questions. So, if i dont go to college, he would probably kill me. lol. Its just a matter of what i want to do. Possibly get a business degree and a law enforcement degree. Also, we have season tix for MSU football, and ya their are SOOO many hott girls up their!

Runner
11-02-2004, 10:37 PM
Two letters....U M.
I have an associate degree in criminal justice and worked in a school Liason position for a number of years. It was a cushy assignment and I loved it, but after awhile, I was at the realization that it just wasn't me. I wanted to be back out in the field full time doing landscape. I had already had the landscape business running for several years, and was losing money by doing other things. So, I wrapped it up, and got the business running full time again. I wish you all the best of luck, and it sounds as if you have a good head on your shoulders, anyway. Like it was said above, you have many doors open and can do anything you set your mind to.

RedWingsDet
11-02-2004, 10:43 PM
Two letters....U M.
I have an associate degree in criminal justice and worked in a school Liason position for a number of years. It was a cushy assignment and I loved it, but after awhile, I was at the realization that it just wasn't me. I wanted to be back out in the field full time doing landscape. I had already had the landscape business running for several years, and was losing money by doing other things. So, I wrapped it up, and got the business running full time again. I wish you all the best of luck, and it sounds as if you have a good head on your shoulders, anyway. Like it was said above, you have many doors open and can do anything you set your mind to.

when you say UM. i assume you mean UofM? if so, i cant get in. I dont have the GPA they require. whereas for MSU, i can get in with my GPA, and MSU is an awsome horticulture school, so i was thinking Business Degree, Horticulture Degree, and some type of Law Enforcement Degree. But atleast the business degree.

pinson
11-02-2004, 11:13 PM
I have been a police officer for 15 years and just recently retired from the force (april 2004). I have owned my own lco for the last 7 years. For the most part I enjoyed the job. As it has been stated in earlier post you do see alot of things that most people will never see and you get to do things that people see on tv. I have seen people murdered, assaulted. Seen them in their best times and worst. I have been shot at, beaten up, but I still got to come home at the end of my shift. Over the 15 years that I was an officer I have seen the crime rate increase at an unbelievable pace. My recommendation to you is stay in school and get a college degree, because more and more departments are requiring one. As for the pay I can't complain. When I retired as a sgt. I was making around $40,000.00 a year (not bad for this location). The main reason I retired early was because I was missing my 2 daughters growing up due to having to work different shifts and weekends. Would I do it it all over, you bet. Would I go back now, no way.

txlawnking
11-02-2004, 11:34 PM
[, plus im hot headed.[/QUOTE]


Two things.. first, this one^^^^^. If YOU consider yourself "hot headed".. then Law enforcement sure ain't for you..

Second, if the only legitimate reason you can think of for being a peace officer is " job security ".. Then I doubt you'll dig getting shot at, or deal with the crap most cops deal with.. and would probly burn out pretty quick.

I'm not trying to be ugly.. I just hope you think real hard about this decision..

rico387
11-03-2004, 01:12 AM
GEO...congrats on being smart enough to voice your concerns about your future, and being honest about your current mindset. At age 16 many possibilities lay at your feet. Go get them my young friend.
Here are some thoughts from a 24yr. firefighter:
1. Pay attention in math class above all. Mathematics is conducive to logical thinking.
2. The obvious is avoid drugs since you only have one chance to tell an employer under oath that you have never taken illegal drugs. This is to include any bottle of pills that doesn't have your name on it. I do mean putting ANYTHING in you mouth that doesn't have YOUR name on the label.
3. Your self described "hot head" will not serve you well as a Law Officer, EMT, of Firefighter, or as an LCO...cool is the rule.
4. Your Mom is your best friend, and will love you in spite of all the stupid things you do.
5. Never forget-you are in the people business. Whether you respond as a deputy to a robbery, or you respond as a firefighter to a person trapped in an overturned car, or as an EMT to a Grandad having chest pains, or as an LCO you go to an ugly lawn where people pay you thier hard earned money to make thier home a good place to return to, our work is to help people. We serve people.
6. Never be shy about expecting to get paid for your good works.
7. pay attention in math class.
Rick IAFF local 2294

Tinkerer
11-03-2004, 04:24 AM
Not sure how up to date this is, but I read somewhere on the web: Jobs you are most likely to get murdered on,,, 1. convenience store clerk. 2. Police officer. 3. Pizza delivery driver.
I mow grass in the daytime and deliver pizza at night. I work in a quiet little town with a good reputation, but 1,2,3,4 times a year I have a run in with a drunk, road rage, threats etc. It will be a great day when my health gets back to where I can do mowing full time again and I can give up pizza delivery.
I honestly think that being a cop is the hardest job you can choose because of the stress and the thin line they have to walk. They have to deal with the worst parts of society. They come to scenes of car crashes where people are dead,, sometimes the dead people aren't in one piece or are crushed or burned. If you really, really have the passion for the job and want to put up with all that goes with it, then do. Otherwise there are much easier ways of making money.

MOW ED
11-03-2004, 07:29 AM
My dad was a Chicago Police Officer for 23 years and I have the greatest respect for the job. He had some very hard times in that job but it was also very rewarding in terms of being able to help people as well as being part of a very large family. My dad loved the job but wanted me to do something else, he worked extra jobs to send me to college. He did say that he never wanted me to get on the job. The problem was that I guess because I grew up around police officers and firefighters something got into my head. My dad had a fatal heart attack at work in 1980 which was 2 months into my first year in college at Michigan Tech. I did get an associates degree and tried to work in the private sector doing CAD drafting but it wasn't what I needed to do forever.
I became a paid on call firefighter/EMT for a small but busy suburb of Chicago in 1984. 5 years later I was hired as a firefighter/EMT in a suburb if Green Bay. I am now a Lieutenant on my department and I also have been a paramedic for 11 years.
I am impressed by your maturity for your years. I will not preach to you but I do want you to remember one thing. If you are serious in your thoughts for the future then dedicate your life to it. These gentlemen that responded and said to get your education are correct. The job market for police/fire/medics is extremely competitive. You need to be the standout in the crowd to get the job you want. The more you know the further you will advance. The other thing that you have to realize is that you need to keep your personal life in order. Being 16 years old is close to being an adult but still very far away. What you do now and in the next few years of your life can shape your future. You have to stay out of trouble. That means that your driving record has to be excellent and you have to avoid any situations that will involve meeting a police officer when you really shouldnt be meeting him. You are gonna be tempted with alcohol and drugs these things will lead you in the wrong direction. If you are serious in your desire then live a good life with your goal in mind. Background checks and interviews are extensive for all of these jobs.
I have found great satisfaction in helping people in fire/ems, I know many police officers who have done the same. There is good and bad to any job.These jobs will make you see a part of life that most aren't able to handle. It is what you make it and a little of what it makes you because you are human. I could never see myself as a suit wearing businessman, I have the need to do what I do.
If you have that need then follow it fully.

geogunn
11-03-2004, 10:02 AM
GEO...congrats on being smart enough to voice your concerns about your future, and being honest about your current mindset.

sir--I think you mean congrats to Premier Landscaping" instead of GEO.........

but I'll always take congrats when I can get them.... LOL!

GEO :)

chimmygew
11-03-2004, 12:26 PM
What are the odds that you would have to use it? I'm an EMT and work closely with law enforcement. Police are always first on scene. scene safety is number one. We do not respond to some calls without a police officer. A lot of times, an officer will do a welfare check on someone. What if that person just went into cardiac arrest? If you aren't trained you can't really do a whole lot and then you have to wait 5-20 minutes on an ambulance. Time is crucial in prehospital care. If you are a certified EMT, you could perform CPR and/or defibrillate someone. A lot of police departments are carrying AED's (automatic external defibrillators) in their trunks nowadays. Just slap on the pads and push a button.

Steve9
11-03-2004, 01:21 PM
100K a year? Yeah right!!!!! The Chief of Police maybe..

bligh61
11-03-2004, 01:46 PM
do both, :blob3: i did for 20 yrs, now retired, full benefits, pension check, still real busy and only 42 years old. sgt. nyc pd

Shadowroll
11-04-2004, 10:12 AM
100K a year? Yeah right!!!!! The Chief of Police maybe..


If you want to move to THE BIG CITY...AKA TORONTO you could be one of hundreds of CITY POLICE making OVER $100,000. a year.

Scroll to page 53 I think TORONTO POLICE SERVICES $100,000+ club/ 2003 Class (http://www.gov.on.ca/FIN/english/salarydisclosure/2004/munic04.pdf)

excell
11-04-2004, 11:23 AM
As a fellow landscaper in the Detroit area and sharing an interest in becoming a police officer, this is a very serious decision. To become an officer in the surrounding suburbs, you may be required to have a degree in law enforcement. In Detroit it is not required. However, the academy is no joke. You will not have time for landscaping while in the acedemy and shift changes may be a challenge after becoming a p.o.
I work full time for D.P.W. and landscape part time. Time management is critical, married with son.

Jordan River
11-07-2004, 08:29 AM
So you want to be a copper, eh?
1. You will not change the world and make it a better place.
2. You will not be a respected person in the community.
3. You will not make a lot of money.
4. You will be sued. The perp is always right. It was your fault.
5. There is no "end" to the means.
6. You will have no "power".
7. People do not call you to their home for coffee & donuts.
8. You CAN die.
9. You will not change the world and make it a better place.
10. You will not change the world and make it a better place.

Dude, get a horticulture degree, work hard, retire at forty, and play the rest of your life!!!!!

And remember, you will not change the world and make it a better place.

Of course, my view of the world is jaded. I work in a city with a population of around 550,000. Maybe if I worked in Mayberry, my view of what others think about cops would be different. But you have to do what you love to do. If you do that, it won't matter what it is, you will be happy. I'm happy as a policeman, but I understand after 17 yrs what it is all about. It's very secure with a decent retirement. And it provides me the time and money to spend on mowing!!!! My son and daughter love to help me mow, so we spend lots of time together. When my mowing knowledge and accounts get to the point where it is more lucrative than the cop gig, I will probably still be a cop. It ain't the work, it's the people I work with (other cops, not thugs) that I like.

Norm Al
11-07-2004, 11:09 AM
firemen make better lawn guys than cops!

geogunn
11-07-2004, 11:53 AM
firemen make better lawn guys than cops!

there are more of them for sure!

GEO :blob3:

pbillings
11-07-2004, 12:57 PM
HELL YES.it is true...If your a hothead I can guarantee a short career in Police work. If you do the public safety thing and have to go through the fire academy, Then be a firefighter. It would be much easier to have a lawn care biz. when your working only a few days a month. I've been a Police Officer for 17 years and am getting out of it because of the things that you ask about. I'm tired of the complaints that everyday people aren't happy that you arrested their son because he was caught stealing a car, so they play the race card. Yes, Police Officers do not have the rights that your everyday sh!thead has........BE A FIREFIGHTER....

Firstclasslawn
11-07-2004, 01:12 PM
Ok listen up man I think you already know what you should do but in case you dont let me tell u that when I was 16 I was partying and drinking and doing the girls instead of work, My friend Shane had lawn business just as you do well we graduated in 1996 and now he earns like 300K a year in profit and owns his lawn business, a tanning salon , and a very very nice office building while I on the other hand am struggling with my first year in the business and have 30 Weekly accounts, STAY with the business not to mention you have a top notch name for your business.

pbillings
11-07-2004, 01:30 PM
[, plus im hot headed.


Two things.. first, this one^^^^^. If YOU consider yourself "hot headed".. then Law enforcement sure ain't for you..

Second, if the only legitimate reason you can think of for being a peace officer is " job security ".. Then I doubt you'll dig getting shot at, or deal with the crap most cops deal with.. and would probly burn out pretty quick.

I'm not trying to be ugly.. I just hope you think real hard about this decision..[/QUOTE]
You'll think twice when you hear automatic weapon fire from an AK-47 hit the side of your patrol car. I was on a traffic stop writing a ticket when, some Knucklehead opened fire on me. It blew out my passenger side windows and came in and blew out my windshield. I heard the whizz by my face numerous times. I don't know what kept them from hitting me. But, I've been on my toes ever since. This kind of thing doesn't happen much, but it does happen. Also, I responded to a burglar alarm. Found a door open and me and another officer went in. I came around a corner and someone hit me in the eye with a large metal object, knocking me out. The other officer was jumped before he could get his weapon. The a-hole got away and we didn't even see what he looked like.....Now my weapon is always out when I enter a dwelling. Like the man said earlier. 90% of boredom with 10% of sheer terror, and you'll never know when it's going to hit.............BE A FIREFIGHTER

legendrider
11-07-2004, 02:31 PM
I just recently had to retire from my career early as well. I was injured on the job. Now I am in the Landscape Industry working for a large company. My advice to you would be this. Go to college. You can mow lawns and earn your degree and see what is is you really want. I knew from day one. I was going to be a cop. Learn all you can before starting the entry process. A wize man once told me. Be one of the few, instead of on of the many. This was regarding College. Do you need it? Not really. But if you want to move up in this world the degree matters. I am studying Forestry in my spare time along with Horticulture. Whatever career you decide just research nd talk to people in the field. No job is what it seems from the outside looking in. If i could do it all again. I would be my own boss and master of my own destiny. Best of Luck!!!

breck75
11-09-2004, 02:29 AM
I am a corrections officer in a smaller county of Michigan. We have lodgers from the Detroit area and they are a big pain in the A$$. I have been a officer for a little over two years and am starting a business in lawn care so that I can get out of the corrections business. I know there is a difference between corrections and a road officer however, you deal with the same dirt bags. Unless you are saving someones life or helping someone in one way or another you will be treated like crap. Inmates don't have anymore rights than you do. All cops have to obey the law like the criminals do however, you'll find that 75% of all inmates have a hard time admitting they did anything wrong, and at times it seems like inmates have more rights than you. And then you always have the ones that think they know more about the law than Jeffery Feiger. I don't believe police officers make 100k a year, unless they work a crap load of O.T. Maybe a Chief, Capt, or Lt. makes that but not a road officer. Anyways, go with your heart, if you really want to be a cop do it. Hot temper is not good in this field, trust me I know. I just did some training with a Detroit FF and he got out of the police work to become a FF. Much more respected job. Kevin

MowerJockey
11-11-2004, 03:03 AM
Hi Mark,

I read your original post and many of the posts by others; mainly the current and former police officers. Every one of these guys hit the nail on the head when it comes to describing the work. I worked ten years in law enforcement, all road work, working in low income and higher income communities. The department I last worked for is in West Michigan and it was one of the highest paying in the state. When it comes to pay; it isnt everything! Even lawn work; if you dont like it, no matter how much money you make, every second will make you miserable. You mentioned people you knew who made over $100K doing police work. I am sure you have encountered the old cliche, "If it sounds too good to be true it probably is." If I had to GUESS; these people you mentioned are probably working 12 hours a day, 7 days a week. Ask yourself, can I run my landscape business working those hours? Now, there is a slight draw back to working long hours as a police officer. More hours equals more calls which means more court. By the way, unless you are working the day shift, you will have to report to court on your off days and off times.

You said you are 16. I admire the fact that you seek information from those with experience. If I had to guess, this is one of the reasons you are so successful with your landscape business. When I graduated from high school I thought I knew it all and no one was going to tell me anything. I became a paramedic at 19 and let me tell you; I knew nothing about the real world! What a wake up call. I considered myself lucky because when I started opening my ears and closing my mouth I avoided a lot of mistakes I saw my friends and classmates making when it came to lifes decisions. I am not going to preach like I had to with many high schoolers I did while working as a police officer. If I had any advise to give you about what to do with your future it would be this. Take everyones post about this subject as opinions, but use them as a tool to help you decide your best interests. Research everything before making any decision; you will have to as a police officer to avoid looking like a fool. Until you experience something for yourself you will never know whether you would have liked it or not. For law enforcement, there are clubs like Explorers that have ride along programs for high schoolers. Some departments have reserve officers who ride with the full time officer. The departments pay for the training. The only catch is you volunteer your time. I would say this is the closest to becoming a certificed police officer without taking the big plunge. Next, when it comes to college, I am going to tell you what my college counselor told me. This counselor was awesome, he didnt try to be a salesman for the college he was straight forward. When I started working towards my bachelors degree this counselor told me to ask myself one question when deciding what degree Major I should pursue. That question is, "If you were physically disabled tomorrow, what job would you be interested in doing?" It was another wake-up call to me. I chose to pursue a degree in science. This way I could work in laboratory or even do research from a computer if need be. Police departments could care less what degree you have as long as it isnt in drama or strictly music. Not to bash those degrees because they have their place in the world but not in law enforcement. Police departments actually like graduates with business and accounting degrees to work with check and fraud cases, they like chemistry and biology degrees for CSI work, sociology for domestic violence specialists; I think you get the idea. Obviously, these would apply to your bigger departments like the state police, Detroit, Wayne County, and Grand Rapids City. Minimum degree would be an Associates Degree. The point here is dont limit yourself to a specific discipline that you couldnt use elsewhere. In Michigan, as long as you have, I believe its 30 college credit hours, you can pay to attend a 16 week academy. The academy on the West side of the state is pretty steep; I believe around $8K.

You are managing 40 accounts at 16 years old??? WOW!! You have a management and/or marketing gift. You are obviously making people happy because they are using your service. You may want to consider looking into working towards a business management degree with a minor study in horticulture. Michigan State University has a nationally honored program that may be of interest to you. Western Michigan University has an excellent business college. University of Michigan is another option for business. You may even work your way towards a Masters degree in business or even a law degree. Cheap lawyers are a dime a dozen but a gifted business manager with a law degree is a hot commodity to becoming a CEO of a major company. With the empire you've started it would probably be your own business. Again, I could go on for ever with the possibilities. Like the other posts say, stay in school, take challenging classes and earn good grades. Get to know your teachers because they will be a major asset when it comes time to getting into a good college. If after you do all this you still want to work as a police officer, then GO FOR IT!!! If you dont like it, fine; if you do, fine.

Some of the posts make police work sound depressing and exciting; dont let it discourage you. Police personnel are one of the biggest brotherhoods in the world. As a police officer you can go to Mexico, show your ID to a police officer and immediately you become friends. Same thing with Canada. Its an exerience that certainly overshadows the depressing side of the job. After being a police officer I can certainly see why war veterans have the relationship that they have with one another; when the world seems so cruel you only have each other to pull you through it. I have been out of police work for almost two years, I dont miss the work by any means but I miss the everyday interaction with my buddies. Even to this day, if I see any police officer on a traffic stop I always slow down to see if he/she is okay particularly if they are alone. I will even pull into a distant parking lot and watch until their backup unit arrives.

You seem to have a pretty good, but hot, head on your shoulders. Once you embarass yourself a few times it will cool off. I bet if you were the opposite and just a big pushover, you wouldnt have built the business that you have!?!?!?! How many times have you looked back on a hot headed decision and told yourself, "That was stupid!" The more times that occurs those words will eventually turn into "Don't do something stupid!" just as your head starts heating up.

Hope it helps.

Be good!!!! :)

Tony1045
11-11-2004, 10:05 AM
Hi, my two cents, Police work is not a bad job in general. I have be at it for 15 years now, five to go and I can retire at age 42 with full benefits. With that being said, it's always a good thing knowing that you will have a pension for the rest of your life, with medical/dental benefits for you as well as your family. I started my career with the Baltimore City PD, then lateraled to a local county PD. I have seem the many highs and lows of this occupation and looking back, YES, I would do it over again. The best way I can sum it up for you is "police work the best job you'll ever hate!!" Trust me, theres a reason why "most" departments offer a 20-25 year retirements. This line of work takes it's toll on you and your family and anybody thats been at for a while, who care about police work will attest to that. Just my opinion. Oh, by the way, police work can be a lot of fun too. I'ts all how you want to make it. Tony :drinkup:

arpat2
11-11-2004, 11:05 AM
I agree. It's looks like Education should be first priority.

breck75
11-11-2004, 02:00 PM
I didn't mean to sound like a police officer is not a respected job, it is to those people that have respect for other people. Sorry if it sounded like the job wasn't respected. Education should be your first priority. One thing I can say from speaking from experience is that if you have a hot temper, and you do pursue a career in law enforcement, let things roll off you back. What I mean by that is when you have a "bad guy" say things about your family or they attack your personal life don't take it to heart. Be concerned but don't loose your cool because thats what the "bad guy" wants. I say this because it's happened to me and is just causes you more head ache than you really want to deal with. Kevin

rockhouse
11-12-2004, 03:09 PM
Reasons to become a fireman instead of a cop

1. Chicks dig firemen
2. You get paid to drive fast, make alot of noise & break things.
3. People are really glad to see you when they call.
4. It's a hoot.
5. Chicks dig firemen.
6. 24-48. We work 24 hours on & have 48 hours off.
7. After 20 years I still love to go to work.
8. Kids look up to you & want to be like you.
9. I've never been shot at by a fire.
10. Chicks dig firemen

Norm Al
11-12-2004, 04:03 PM
http://www.bubbajames.com/Humormill/Firemen08.jpg

Norm Al
11-12-2004, 04:05 PM
http://homepage.tinet.ie/~trojan/firemen.jpg

battags
11-13-2004, 10:19 PM
You should become a firefighter instead.


Hose Heads! Argh! :rolleyes:

Brian