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View Full Version : Bidding against trugreen


stimpy
11-19-2004, 09:11 PM
The subdivision I live in has some common areas. tennis court, pool, little islands that tru green takes care of. They are doing a pretty bad job. brown spots big bare areas. I am not a LCO I am a carpenter but I will be buying some commercial equipment this winter for rentals and foreclosers I handle. I was thinking about bidding on these areas. Before I go to the homeowners a.s.o I would like to here your opinions on if its worth it and how to go about it. I will be set up as a legal business already for the foreclosures. Thanks to all the pros on this site. It has been a big help in my equipment choices.

MudslinginFX4
11-19-2004, 09:14 PM
You will have to also get a special license to be able to spray and use chemicals. It will be hard to underbid tru green. Try doing a search on this topic, or type in "tru green" into the search bar and it will pull up tons of information to your questions! Welcome to the site.

wagner17
11-19-2004, 09:32 PM
I wish you all of the luck, but unfortunately unless you can convince the homeowner's association that TruGreen does a shoddy job, you will have a difficult time underbidding them. They can afford to give a lowball offer, where you may not be able to. I would simply give a realistic bid and spin the poor quality that TruGreen offers. Just do not sell yourself short or you will regret it in the long run.

tiedeman
11-19-2004, 11:54 PM
welcome to the site stimpy. My best advice would be to do some searching on applications and tru-green to find out more.

YardPro
11-20-2004, 07:58 PM
DON"T DO IT
first if you under bid tru green you'll go bankrupt.

they are the wal mart of the green industry.

next, NEVER take on a large gob that requires a good amount of knowledge about a profession with no experience.

it's like a landscaper trying to start a business by bidding on building on a house.

you have no liscense, no knowledge of the chemicals needed, no knowledge og the grass types, weed types, etc.
you will have no way of knowing the scope of work, and material costs involved.

start small, there is a big learning curve.

MidAtlantic
11-21-2004, 01:39 PM
Better sell yourself well as well as look professional and knowledgable. I tell customers we are not the cheapest but we are the best to work with. I tell them that there is no way a "nation wide franchise" can service them better a mid sized company can. Granted if you are a one man show you better work on selling yourself from all aspects. Everybody knows Trugreen is a huge company and that they are just a number in their bottom line. Sell yourself and your commitment to offer them the best service money can buy. Most of all back it up with great service. Trust me most people are more than willing to pay an honest person who does great work 30% more knowing that they will get the attention they deserve.

Trugreen is in it to make money just like all of us. If a customer is looking for the lowest price just let them know you always get what you pay for. Let Trugreen have it...There is lots of work out there. Just let the customer know that you are more than willing to help or assist them with any problems they may have in the future. This way you keep yourself in the door when they aren't happy. You might want to call them every year as a follow up to see how things are going.

Always keep the door open....

stimpy
11-22-2004, 07:16 PM
Thanks fellas.Alot of great points I can relate to. I am into quality. I cant stand fixing peoples coble jobs or people who take on task they are not familiar with. The grass looks so bad I was thinking about fixing it my self when I had some time. I drive by it six times a day and it really bugs me. My big concern was getting educated in turf care before the home owners a.s.s.o signs next years contract and I loose a season. For some reason since the realtors offered me their forclosures a couple of months ago I have become facinated with grass and how to make it look better and the whole LCO buiseness.If I cant get rid of them with quality at a fair price I wont mess with it. Thanks agian happy trails and stripes kenn

AllStarLawnCare
11-22-2004, 08:02 PM
I think education is the best thing someone starting out can have on their side. You said you are fascinated with grass and making it look good - the best news is that grass is fairly simple if you'll put in the time to learn about it.

Since you'll want to learn about grass anyway with your own properties, the best "Grass 101" resource I've come across so far is "The Lawn Bible" written by David Mellor (groundskeeper for Fenway Park - Redsox stadium.) It covers just about everything you'll want to know about from soil to grass types to weeds, insects, diseases, etc. And it's written for homeowners, so it's simple to understand.

Fascination is a good start, it will fuel your desire to learn, which will improve the quality of your service. Good luck!

wayne volz
11-25-2004, 12:04 PM
My question is this.

Why are you trying to underbid a job that you are telling us is an inferior job in the first place. Maybe you should charge more and explain that your quality will be what they deserve and not what they are receiving.