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View Full Version : Tons & Tons of Compost, Manure, & Organic soil will SALE, NC


Dig,Yard,Dirt
11-22-2004, 01:01 AM
Do you guys use this for new installation of grass or planting shrubs?

I think compost is perfect to till up with red clay dirt, fertilize shrubs & trees, or use in flower beds. I have a large amount and could sell some stock pile.

My father and I have 80-70 beef cattle using 4 different barns making tons & tons of compost a year. I clean out the barns and mix it with hay, leaves, and dirt to make organic black dirt. Sometimes, I sell and deliver 5-6 tons of compost to the surrounding counties.

I always have the compost in different stages of decomposed matter, solid wet to granular dry. It takes almost 10 years to make perfect black dirt.

If you need some, e-mail me to make arrangements, price depends on location. I will also sell and load compost cheaper if picked up in southern Caldwell Co. NC. I will help you with your landscaping projects or work with you if you resale it to a customer.
digyarddirt@yahoo.com

Dchall_San_Antonio
11-30-2004, 04:23 PM
Tons & Tons of Compost, Manure, & Organic soil will SALE, NCFirst of all, please don't advertise here. If you want to advertise, pay for it.

Do you guys use this for new installation of grass or planting shrubs?All that is needed is a light layer of compost - fully developed and fresh smelling compost. Zero manure allowed! There ought to be a law against using fresh manure, or even unripened compost, anywhere in the garden.

I think compost is perfect to till up with red clay dirt, fertilize shrubs & trees, or use in flower beds. I have a large amount and could sell some stock pile.Needs no tilling. Just lay it gently on top of the soil.

My father and I have 80-70 beef cattle using 4 different barns making tons & tons of compost a year. I clean out the barns and mix it with hay, leaves, and dirt to make organic black dirt. Sometimes, I sell and deliver 5-6 tons of compost to the surrounding counties.Beef cattle in barns? Let me digress to say that I've never seen beef cattle in barns. I've seen thousands of beeves on thousands of acres and no barns. Your costs must be incredible. But anyway, back to the message...real compost is not mixed with dirt. Professionals need to watch from whom they buy their materials :cry:

I always have the compost in different stages of decomposed matter, solid wet to granular dry. It takes almost 10 years to make perfect black dirt.Wet manure has no place anywhere except in the compost pile. Cattle ranchers I know create 1 additional inch of ready organic soil per year simply by controlling how the animals roam on it. Again, no barns!

If you need some, e-mail me to make arrangements, price depends on location. I will also sell and load compost cheaper if picked up in southern Caldwell Co. NC. I will help you with your landscaping projects or work with you if you resale it to a customer.I'll pass.

Fishin LCO
11-30-2004, 05:05 PM
As a moderator you should have just deleted the thread and sent him a PM telling him advertising is not allowed.

Dig,Yard,Dirt
11-30-2004, 07:46 PM
First, I'm not trying to advertise, I don't need the money or business!!! I was just trying to help some people that wants it.

Second, I apoligize to the moderator and the members of the website.

But I got to ask Dechall,,,,, never seen a barn for cattle???? You are a city boy.

I must explain for the people who doesn't understand. I live in western NC, the soil is red clay and the soil has no nutrient value. A lot of home owners desire a thick coat of manure on top of their garden area in the fall. Late fall the garden must be turn over with a turning plow. By spring, the garden is tilled mixing the manure and red clay to make the perfect soil for gardening.

A lot people also like the manure or black cow for flower beds.

This concept of compost is popular for my area or region. The culture here is to ultilize very possible way of fertilize or natural organic material for heathier flowers, vegetables, shrubs, or grass.

I wasn't refering to spread a truck load of stinking dripping cow crap on a million dollar lawn in a premier community,,, come on,, think about.

This is about compost and organic material right???? You can't get any more organic than this resource from cattle.

Dig,Yard,Dirt
11-30-2004, 08:18 PM
"I'm not here to dictate organic policy to your industry. I'm here to help y'all learn what organics is all about and see if we can find a profitable way to implement it for those clients who want it."

quote David Hall, Moderator, Organic Lawn Care Forum

David, I'm not trying to mock you. I also want to learn different methods from different regions. You are right about cattle in your area, I agree, I've been there and seen it.
The Texas range is different than my hilly mountain area, farmers use barns for storage, sick cattle, cattle shelter, feeding, birthing, penning, loading for transport, etc. Over time the barn floor becomes thick with buildup from cow waste and hay. The farmer has to clean out the barn to prevent foot rot, flies, and other unhealthy conditions for the cows. This is very common and a must for our region.

We currently have five barns at different locations that holds 600 round bales, 4,000 square bales, and each barn can still hold a herd of cattle.

I could send some pictures and show everyone my aspect of creating organic matter.

Ric
12-05-2004, 12:08 PM
Dig

I once lived in Louisiana and had a 100 acres. 85 acres was Coastal Bahia and Alicia Bermuda Hay mixed. Across the street from me was a 200 acre Dairy Farm.

I am not going in to details but I had the best garden around. Now Gumbo Mud is very rich, however it is high clay content. Mix in a little sand and you get concrete but add organic matter and you have excellent results. My 1/4 acre garden fed many families and kept several freezers full.

BTW Louisiana Sugar Cane farmers have been growing Cane for over a hundred years and have yet to put the first bag of Fertilizer on it. Every two years they just plow under the old cane stalks and replant.

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-05-2004, 12:45 PM
Thanks Ric,
You had abundance of compost for gardening. I bet you're soil really worked well, it seemed to have fed a lot of people.

Very good point, we never use man made fertilizers in our garden. It just doesn't have the same effect and results. If hobby gardeners only knew what we know.

Thanks for your support

muddstopper
12-05-2004, 08:04 PM
While fresh manure is often sprayed on farmers fields and used in home gardens, it is seldom used in a commercial setting. Smell and high ammonium content makes it unsuitable for use on lawns. Once the manure is composted it takes on a whole different chemical composure. The composted manures are what you usually find a Lowes, Homedepot and Wally World in those neat little bags called compost. The manure is usually mixed with straw, sawdust, paper waste, ect and allowed to compost. Once it is fully composted it shouldnt have any smell and the high ammonium levels will be reduced to usable levels. Mixing it with clay soils will help loosen up the compacted nature of the soil and make nutrients available to the plant. It also makes a good seeding medium for planting grass seed. http://www.p2pays.org/ref/13/12560.pdf
. It has show better moisture holding capacity than other forms of mulch used for seeding purposes and also and excellent erosion control material. The point here is that it should be fully composted before use. I have personally used old manure to build up the soil in my garden. I did so by digging my garden spot 2 ft deep and mixing the manure in with the soil. as I filled in the hole. I then tilled the soil to thoroughly mix the heavy clay soil with the manure. the results where almost amazing. Onions as big as soft balls, squash and cucumbers that where huge and produced faster than I could keep them picked. Tomato slices bigger that a slice of bread. All without the aid of any fertilizer.

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-05-2004, 08:43 PM
Yes, I agree. The manure has to go through its composting cycles to have useable compost. The fresh manure out of the barn can not be worked with in any application.

That's the compost I'm referring to in my post. It also helps the red clay lawns produce healthier, thicker, and darker fescue.

Organic compost isn't man made, I think some people doesn't know the basics or fundementals of organic farming or gardening.

Thanks for your reply, Tommy

Ric
12-05-2004, 09:03 PM
Dig & Mudd

You guys need to tell the sod farms here in Florida about fresh mature. They have been useing fresh Human Mature from the treatment plants for many years. Now granted It has had some anaerobic decomposition in the treatment tanks.

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-05-2004, 10:15 PM
I've used that also, the great thing about is, it's free!!!! The sewer treatment plant by-product organic waste works great. The only problem I've had is spreading the clumpy stuff. It seems like it never dries enough to spread it effectively without using heavy machinery. We use it on open hay fields, gardens, and pastures.

Man is that stuff heavy hauling it. had to use 4lo in the dodge cummins to climb the hill out of the sewer plant. Stopping it wasn't an issue, I couldn't!!!

Thanks for the reply

jimslawns
12-05-2004, 10:26 PM
You guys sure spread it around, I gotta go get my boots :)

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-06-2004, 12:05 AM
Boots...

I think I'd get the waders, It's gonna get deep!!!

daycab
12-06-2004, 08:33 AM
I guess being a moderator on a lawn site makes you an an expert on cattle. Using a barn allows you to compost manure by using deep stall bedding. I refer you to Joel Salatins excellent book, "Salad Bar Beef".

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-06-2004, 03:57 PM
No experts, just sharing information and learning from other one's experiences.

sheshovel
12-11-2004, 01:15 AM
I disagree Dig,Yard<Dirt Organic compost can and is made by man all the time and has been for many thousands of years,and a good man made compost pile has had soil added to it when built.

sheshovel
12-11-2004, 01:17 AM
Whoops --I disagree Dig,Yard,Dirt, Organic compost can and is made by man all the time and has been for many thousands of years.

Planet Landscaping
12-11-2004, 06:50 AM
Manure = the first fertilizer known and still used in many places.

arborist-28
12-11-2004, 08:17 AM
using composted materials which aren't completely composted can do more harm then good for example fixating nitrogen , c

Dig,Yard,Dirt
12-11-2004, 09:53 AM
Sheshovel---man has made compost for thousands of years, I agree. Using barn waste mixed with manure, hay, and a little dirt makes another excellent compost, not fresh, but after it sits and decompositions, end results=====black dirt or black cow.

Arborist, I agree with you, fresh or raw manure is high in nitrogen especially chicken litter, barn waste isn't that bad . The barn manure needs to decompose before using it in the lawn.

But!!!!!! Guys don't forget,,, spreading fresh raw manure on fields to produce fast growth of hay is practiced all of the world for thousands of years. If done properly, it is better than any fertilizer on the market!!! I know, I've done this all my life. Why do think manure spreaders are made.

My father has raised broiler chickens for Holly Farms (grower of the year 1969) and Case Farms all of his life and mine. We had to clean out the houses every year 49,950 square feet of litter 4-6" thick. We spread the litter directly on the fields during the winter/early spring. We always had the best hay and almost perfect soil conditions considering it was red clay.

Now, we don't raise chickens and we have to buy fertilizer 17-17-17 and amonia nitrate (20-25 tons total) and only get have the quality. Plus every year drill seed during the fall (700-900lbs of seed).

The barn cattle waste gets spread also, but most of it is stock piled until it breaks down (too hard to spread and takes too much time), it mainly goes into gardens, tilled in new lawns, tilled in flower beds, etc. etc.

I will argue with guys who has never stepped in crap but knows everything about. Its not scientific its just common sense in the right application.