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View Full Version : Toyota Trucks for towing.....


SouthernYankee
11-29-2004, 03:10 PM
I already have a 3500 chevy dump, but I hate mowing out of it. I have had many toyota trucks and I am thinking about getting a toyota v6 tacoma to pull a 12' enclosed trailer with a ztr and maybe a 48' fixed deck.

I know the new toyotas have 245hp, but I am going to get a used one with probally 220hp. Is that enough truck to pull a trailer or do I need a tundra v6 or v8?

Any advice on toyotas and towing would be helpful. thanks SY

PLM-1
11-29-2004, 03:20 PM
I already have a 3500 chevy dump, but I hate mowing out of it. I have had many toyota trucks and I am thinking about getting a toyota v6 tacoma to pull a 12' enclosed trailer with a ztr and maybe a 48' fixed deck.

I know the new toyotas have 245hp, but I am going to get a used one with probally 220hp. Is that enough truck to pull a trailer or do I need a tundra v6 or v8?

Any advice on toyotas and towing would be helpful. thanks SY

Power is always nice. I have pulled my 7x18 with my dad's 5.2 318 V8 and could have used more power. I have a 5.9 360 and still could use more! I would think that V6 would be scary slow. The other thing you need to think about is stopping! Most anything will pull anything but stopping is the key.

Lovbcstiller
12-05-2004, 09:54 AM
I probley wan't do it with that kind of truck. The tocoma is not heavy enought to pull that kind of trailer. The other post is right about stopping. My v6 full size chevy has enough weight to it. I have a 83"x16'trailer and that does push a little with the electric brakes on. if you do go with make sure you get electric brakes on the trailer. It will help stopping it.

Randy Scott
12-05-2004, 10:23 AM
Torque is what will pull the trailer, where are those numbers at?

Secondly, stopping power and the ability to not have the trailer control the truck. I would imagine it will be fine, but just have to know the limits. Mirrors might not be quite as useful as a full size trucks would be, since the truck is a little narrower it might be harder to see around it.

Albemarle Lawn
12-05-2004, 12:38 PM
Plenty of power. My Mitsubishi-Fuso has 145 HP and I run around at 14,000 lbs all day long without breaking a sweat.

RandyScott has a good point...torque. If you are talking about the 4.5 or 4.7 liter V8 motors, you have enough power.

What is the axle ratio? Manual or automatic? If you are manual trans, you would want like a 4.56:1 gear, automatic at least 4.10:1 for a heavy trailer.

You may want to stiffen up the rear suspension and run a smaller tire, no big "balloon" tires.

Trans cooler if automatic is a must!!!

Brakes: the trailer will need to have properly functioning electric brakes, preferably on both axles, with a good brake control in the truck.

Keep your load as light as possible and you will be fine.

You will possibly need to run 93 octane gas if you hear the engine ping under heavy load.

KB

MTR
12-05-2004, 01:22 PM
I already have a 3500 chevy dump, but I hate mowing out of it. I have had many toyota trucks and I am thinking about getting a toyota v6 tacoma to pull a 12' enclosed trailer with a ztr and maybe a 48' fixed deck.

I know the new toyotas have 245hp, but I am going to get a used one with probally 220hp. Is that enough truck to pull a trailer or do I need a tundra v6 or v8?

Any advice on toyotas and towing would be helpful. thanks SY

I have a LCO neighbor who used to have a v6 Tacoma (prerunner) pulling his open 12' trailer, but since he got a Ferris Ztr, and a 48" Ferris WB, and a new tandem axle trailer, he traded in his Tacoma for an F 250, so I think this should answer your question...
I would not use a compact pickup to tow a Z and a WB same time on an enclosed trailer.
You will hurt your Tacoma tranny, engine, and of course brakes within 1 year of "daily" mowing accounts.

KLLawn
12-15-2004, 10:47 PM
Hey! This is my first post y'all! I appreciate the excellent info that is posted on Lawnsite. So, you want to pull a trailer with a Toyota? SouthernYankee? After reading all of the other responses, I agree with most of 'em.
Joplinmower is right about stopping. Man! A large trailer behind a Tacoma is downright illegal! If the trailer starts to control the rig (mentioned by RandyScott) -Wipeout! Forget about the V6. Even though the V6 is solid as a rock ( I have the V6 in my 4Runner, and had it in my old T-100) the perfomance specs were substandard. The tranny is bulletproof but in towing mode it doesn;t EVEN compare to a fullsize 1/2 Ton. My T-100 tranny would HUNT through the gears like crazy, towing my 3,000 lb. trailer. I had a 2000 Tundra, and this is a big plus in the TORQUE category (tranny still hunts a bit , even with the V8). I now have the 2004 Toyota Tundra DOUBLECAB and this is a big plus, because the DC is heavier! The axle ratio (4:10) is what you must have.

KLLawn
12-15-2004, 10:49 PM
Hey! This is my first post y'all! I appreciate the excellent info that is posted on Lawnsite. So, you want to pull a trailer with a Toyota? SouthernYankee? After reading all of the other responses, I agree with most of 'em.
Joplinmower is right about stopping. Man! A large trailer behind a Tacoma is downright illegal! If the trailer starts to control the rig (mentioned by RandyScott) -Wipeout! Forget about the V6. Even though the V6 is solid as a rock ( I have the V6 in my 4Runner, and had it in my old T-100) the perfomance specs were substandard. The tranny is bulletproof but in towing mode it doesn;t EVEN compare to a fullsize 1/2 Ton. My T-100 tranny would HUNT through the gears like crazy, towing my 3,000 lb. trailer. I had a 2000 Tundra, and this is a big plus in the TORQUE category (tranny still hunts a bit , even with the V8). I now have the 2004 Toyota Tundra DOUBLECAB and this is a big plus, because the DC is heavier! The axle ratio (4:10) is what you must have. Buy a Tundra, Sierra, F150, Ram- GO BIG!

SouthernYankee
12-15-2004, 11:36 PM
I have changed my mind to one of the new tundras

KCLandscape
12-16-2004, 12:25 AM
Have one, love it! Had a 2000 tundra single cab-#10425. Needed more inside space for guys and weekend family excursions. I pull a enclosed trailer. Installed a brake system and have had no problems. See a few other guys with T100 or tacomas, but the V8 is the DEAL!

SouthernYankee
12-16-2004, 01:31 AM
Kc,

I was planning on getting a tundra access cab with a v8, I would only be pulling a 12' enclosed , Do I need the brake kit and if so how much did it run you? thanks SY

zmowingmaster
12-16-2004, 03:15 AM
i've been towing an open 5x10 trailor for a year with a ford ranger, never had problems with stopping or accelerating,mine had a 165hp and a 220 torque (that what the manual says) since it is a 4.0 liters, i had a 52" stander on it, a 36" wb bobcat, and most of the time i kept my first two bags of grass way in the back, so the mowers don't move...
trailor=720 lbs
stander= 750 lbs
bobcat= 400lbs ( i think)
so that is 1870lbs
throw in some extra stuff, so up to 2000lbs and doing good.
so i think (just a thought)(not sure) that 220 torque is good for pulling 2000lbs,
look up yuour equipment weights,and see how much your truck can pull,( i usually pull less than what a truck can handle) i wanna keep my engine and tranny good.
i hope this might help for comparison :)

KLLawn
12-16-2004, 09:48 AM
Hey! Y'all This is my 2nd posting ever! The last comment on the Ford is very true. You need to keep within the abilities of the rig, so as not to overload all of the components.

MTR
12-16-2004, 12:48 PM
As far as mowing job goes, it is okay I think to use Tacoma or Ranger, but to do ocassionally sodding job or even resodding entire lawns, you will be stuck and end up having to pay extra to have those pallets delivered to the site.
1 pallet of St. Augustine is about 2500-3000 lbs covering only 500 sq.ft, 2 pallets are about 5000 lbs, your Tacoma is done! How about hauling mulch, palm trees , oak trees, rocks, top soil, marble chips? on and on...
I learn hard and expensive lessons so I would not go for compact pickup to do lawn serivice and landscaping.
F-150 or Tundra is a base to start.

LawnScapers of Dayton
12-16-2004, 02:02 PM
see next post.....sorry, I hit the wrong button.

LawnScapers of Dayton
12-16-2004, 02:03 PM
OK...well.......I have been using Toyota Truck for years... First the 3.0 V6 then the 3.6 V6. I have never has any problems. I did however upgrade my trailer to a 6.5x12 tandem with electric brakes. And add a transmission cooler. My toys have never let me down. You just have to understand and respect the limitations. I currently am running a 96' 4Runner. Not the best because it is not a pickup truck. But it is paid for and I can haul my kids as needed. I will change when I can. I would love a 3/4 Toyota Diesel.........Oh I also plow with the 4Runner and a Snoway plow. My mechanic says the transmission and rear-end fluids look brand new...after 2 years.....

I have also towed a 25 ft travel trailer with no problems. I little slow but we got there.


Derek

KCLandscape
12-16-2004, 07:38 PM
Nice choice. I think the new access cabs come with reciever hitch and wiring built in. When I got mine there was a harness included that made the brake controller hookup a piece of cake. I bought the controller and had my mechanic hook it up. Maybe 200 total. Transmission cooler is already installed factoyr as well. When I bought the 2000 I had to add on liner, hitch, redo wiring for 7 pin harnass...It was a drag and alot of extra money.
For less than I paid for that one it all came included with the doublecab. Drove out the door ready to work!
Ever seen tundrasolutions.com?

hosejockey2002
12-16-2004, 11:48 PM
You can get a brake controller for $100 or so, depending on which one you get. It's cheaper than a set of brake pads and rotors, which you will fry in short order doing a lot of stop and go driving with the trailer, as well as being safer.

KLLawn
12-19-2004, 02:50 AM
2 things to look out for. 1st- Toyota Tundra brakes from 2000-2003 were notorious for early wearout. 20K is what I got, until I had to replace. 2nd- The rear leaf springs were weak. With 500 lbs. the Tundra would sag. Solutions : 1) Buy a newer Tundra (2003 or better) different braking setup and 2) Add a leaf spring. I did this to my 2004 double cab. Rear end is now stiff enuf to do serious chores. I lifted the front alittle also, to even out the truck (3") Tundra DC's come with tranny cooler, 130 amp alternator and the best 7 pin connector on the market- no joke!)

LawnScapers of Dayton
12-19-2004, 07:44 AM
That is a good idea....I hate how these trucks these days sit with the nose down. I like a nice level truck.

Derek

KLLawn
12-19-2004, 10:17 AM
I lifted the Toyota Doublecab 3" front and back. The process became more and more of an experimental disaster. I had to weld limiting straps , add differential drop spacers, and upper control arm ball joint spacers ( to quit the rubbing between the ball joint and the spring) I don't know if I should've made the mods but, NOW this Tundra looks hyped up. Added a Westin bull bar and now... well.. I don't want to tow anything!
Back to towing....I once towed a 5000 lb Stingray boat with my V6 T-100 and cracked the flywheel !!!! Toyota was befuddled...what was I towing, they asked. Well, I ate that repair bill. They said I overloaded.. Oh Well.

brucec32
12-29-2004, 05:03 AM
A) The new Tacomas are larger than the old ones.

B) you should have trailer brakes on that big of a trailer to ease the braking load. I went without them for years since my trailer was small and the load relatively light, but after two incidents in a year (wet roads in one case and a rental chipper with no trailer brakes the other) , I installed them on my trailer.

C) The new Tacomas have 4 wheel abs, my Tundra didn't and it had problems in some conditions when towing.

D) Saftey wise, the more nimble Tacoma may actually have an advantage vs some of the cumbersome big rigs out there. Road feel and steering is better, and they even have vehicle skid assist available if you order one.

E) Power is adequate, but the current trend tends to be guys wanting to tow 5,000 lb trailers and have it feel like you've got nothing back there at all. That can be a safety hazard in itself if you forget what you're driving and drive too fast for conditions.

F) The heavier enclosed trailer with two mowers on it vs. an open with wb's only or just one ZTR is pushing it, though. Trailers can have a tendency to "steer" a vehicle towing them in emergency situations.

I witnessed a full size Ford towing mowers run a light, skid for a long time, (no trailer brakes) and hit a car just a couple of weeks ago. He managed to avoid the car with all but the wheel wells of his trailer. Trailer brakes or 4 wheel abs would have prevented this one.

KLLawn
12-29-2004, 11:49 AM
Hey Brucec, Thanks for the input. Those Tacomas are real nice. The price tag is $29,500 nicely loaded. For $2000 more, you can get a fully loaded Tundra DOUBLECAB!
As for towing, you have GOT to have a trailer braking system in place. Toyota trucks now have all waterproof connections, they are excellent.

I don't trust small 1/4 ton vehicles, because they can't control large trailers during difficult driving conditions. Toyota V6 did not have much power (low torque rating). I had an accident in a 21/2 ton Army truck in Germany, ...3 ton trailer..brakes failed ...crashed the truck on the autobahn...survived to tell this story!

QualityLawnCare4u
01-12-2005, 02:18 AM
I have a 2000 tundra with the V8 and it pulls my trailor with 2 ztr with no problems. The only problem I had was the brake rotors would warp real easy, but I think I have it fixed now. I also have a nissan V6 that pulled my equipment for 5 years and it was hurting, even though it would pull it. I would not go with less than a V8 in anything for the kind of work we do.

hosejockey2002
01-13-2005, 08:54 PM
If the only problem you've had with your Tundra is warped brake rotors, how is it killing you in repairs like your sig says? :confused:

QualityLawnCare4u
01-14-2005, 01:28 AM
If the only problem you've had with your Tundra is warped brake rotors, how is it killing you in repairs like your sig says? :confused:

hosejockey, this is in a 2 week period, bad luck I guess

1) timing belt-$275
2)brake rotors warped-$70
3)warped again next day-170 for complete brake job
4)warped again in 2 days-shop refused to fix again and had ugly argument :angry:
5) had brakes fixed at dealer, said other shop did incorrectly,$192
6)warped again in 230 miles, dealer installed rotors at cost, no labor $150
7)shimmy not completely gone-force tire balance and alignment- $80
For past week has been ok, I really like the truck compared to my nissan, pulls and rides great.

KCLandscape
01-14-2005, 01:36 AM
I had a 2000 4x4 SR5 longbed. Had to do the brake pads 2 times in almost 4 years. I pull a W/C enclosed for the equip and a open for bulk materials. Also have trailer brake and brakes on both trailers. Never pushed the max limits but came close. Brakes were ready for another job...total overhaul...when I traded in for 04 doublecab with new, better brake setup( I grilled the dealer and the head mechanic about the upgrades in brake system). Been 6 months, I feel I made the right choice! :cool2:

hosejockey2002
01-15-2005, 02:08 AM
OK, that makes more sense. Do you have trailer brakes? This seems to underscore my opinion of the larger Toyota and Nissan trucks- Superbly put together, smooth powerful engines, but underneath it all, the brakes, axles and other underpinnings seem barely stout enough to handle the truck in everyday commuting. They don't seem stout enough to handle the tough commercial abuse we give them. The Tundra's rear axle looks to be the same size as a Tacoma's. The rear axle on an F150 looks much larger and stronger.

MTR
01-15-2005, 02:12 PM
Toyota Trucks (Tundra, Tacoma) : mudding, off-roading, dirt-climbing, small boat towing, carpentry, and light construction, pool services, homebuilder inspection, 65% of girls buy Tacoma, what else?

Ford (F150-250-350, Ranger): Lawn service, log-pulling, expressway construction, heavy construction, concrete, sand, stone and gravel, home-building, most county trucks are Ford, pulling 18-23 ft boats most of the time, 65% of guys love F 150-250 what else?

QualityLawnCare4u
01-15-2005, 02:26 PM
OK, that makes more sense. Do you have trailer brakes? This seems to underscore my opinion of the larger Toyota and Nissan trucks- Superbly put together, smooth powerful engines, but underneath it all, the brakes, axles and other underpinnings seem barely stout enough to handle the truck in everyday commuting. They don't seem stout enough to handle the tough commercial abuse we give them. The Tundra's rear axle looks to be the same size as a Tacoma's. The rear axle on an F150 looks much larger and stronger.

Hosejockey, no I dont have trailor brakes. I figured if my Nissan pulled it fine for 90K miles the Toyota should to. I will agree I had MUCH rather have a full size Ford or Chevy but this truck was picked up for a price within my scrimpy budget and was the best I can do now. My Nissan is now having a rear end put in it and I might go back to using it instead of the Tundra since It has given me so few problems. Pulled my trailor every day with equipment with no problems and stopped with no problems, but it was underpowered esp. going up a hill or incline.

YardPro
01-16-2005, 10:20 AM
The other thing you need to think about is stopping! Most anything will pull anything but stopping is the key.


bingo
we run several s-10's as mowin trucks. they are fine for a small 7X12 trailer with a few walk behinds.

they have occasionally been used to pull aa s-185 bobcat. pulling was slow but not too bad, stopping was a whole other story.

KLLawn
01-17-2005, 04:44 PM
Toyota Trucks (Tundra, Tacoma) : mudding, off-roading, dirt-climbing, small boat towing, carpentry, and light construction, pool services, homebuilder inspection, 65% of girls buy Tacoma, what else?

Ford (F150-250-350, Ranger): Lawn service, log-pulling, expressway construction, heavy construction, concrete, sand, stone and gravel, home-building, most county trucks are Ford, pulling 18-23 ft boats most of the time, 65% of guys love F 150-250 what else?

Really Funny Thing happened last year. New Jersey had a snowstorm in March 04. That weekend I had Army Reserve duty. Our Colonel let us out early due to the immense storm (30" and growing). A Drill Sergeant with a Ranger tried to go 4wd and it was broke. I saw this before in Ford Trucks (Oklahoma, New York ), it was usually a switch. I tow roped that Ranger 45 miles through unplowed NJ Turnpike, because that's what soldiers do for each other! Tundras can do a little bit more than pool services... Thanks MTR