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0money
12-05-2004, 08:04 PM
How do you guys go about making a perfect circle around a tree to put your mulch in?

Coffeecraver
12-06-2004, 06:53 AM
I use a hand spade and create the circle at the drip line of the tree

Proper Mulching Techniques

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Mulches are materials placed over the soil surface to maintain moisture and improve soil conditions. Mulching is one of the most beneficial things a home owner can do for the health of a tree. Mulch can reduce water loss from the soil, minimize weed competition, and improve soil structure. Properly applied, mulch can give landscapes a handsome, well-groomed appearance. Mulch must be applied properly; if it is too deep or if the wrong material is used, it can actually cause significant harm to trees and other landscape plants.

Benefits of Proper Mulching

• Helps maintain soil moisture. Evaporation is reduced, and the need for watering can be minimized.
• Helps control weeds. A 2-4 inch layer of mulch will reduce the germination and growth of weeds.
• Mulch serves as nature’s insulating blanket. Mulch keeps soils warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer.
• Many types of mulch can improve soil aeration, structure (aggregation of soil particles), and drainage over time.
• Some mulches can improve soil fertility.
• A layer of mulch can inhibit certain plant diseases.
• Mulching around trees helps facilitate maintenance, and can reduce the likelihood of damage from "weed whackers" or the dreaded "lawnmower blight."
• Mulch can give planting beds a uniform well-cared-for look.

Trees growing in a natural forest environment have their roots anchored in a rich, well-aerated soil full of essential nutrients. The soil is blanketed by leaves and organic materials that replenish nutrients and provide an optimal environment for root growth and mineral uptake. Urban landscapes, however, are typically a much harsher environment with poor soils, little organic matter, and big fluctuations in temperature and moisture. Applying a 2-4 inch layer of organic mulch can mimic a more natural environment and improve plant health.

The root system of a tree is not a mirror image of the top. The roots of most trees can extend out a significant distance from the tree trunk. Although the guideline for many maintenance practices is the drip line the outermost extension of the canopy the roots can grow many times that distance. In addition, most of the fine absorbing roots are located within inches of the soil surface. These roots, which are essential for taking up water and minerals, require oxygen to survive. A thin layer of mulch, applied as broadly as practical, can improve the soil structure, oxygen levels, temperature, and moisture availability where these roots grow.

Types of Mulch

Mulches are available commercially in many forms. The two major types of mulch are inorganic and organic. Inorganic mulches include various types of stone, lava rock, pulverized rubber, geotextile fabrics, and other materials. Inorganic mulches do not decompose and do not need to be replenished often. On the other hand, they do not improve soil structure, add organic materials, or provide nutrients. For these reasons, most horticulturists and arborists prefer organic mulches.

Organic mulches include wood chips, pine needles, hardwood and softwood bark, cocoa hulls, leaves, compost mixes, and a variety of other products usually derived from plants. Organic mulches decompose in the landscape at different rates depending on the material. Those that decompose faster must be replenished more often. Because the decomposition process improves soil quality and fertility, many arborists and other landscape professionals consider this a positive characteristic, despite the added maintenance.


Not Too Much!

As beneficial as mulch is, too much can be harmful. The generally recommended mulching depth is 2 to 4 inches. Unfortunately, North American landscapes are falling victim to a plague of overmulching. A new term, "mulch volcanoes," has emerged to describe mulch that has been piled up around the base of trees. Most organic mulches must be replenished, but the rate of decomposition varies. Some mulches, such as cypress mulch, remain intact for many years. Top dressing with new mulch annually (often for the sake of refreshing the color) creates a buildup to depths that can be unhealthy. Deep mulch can be effective in suppressing weeds and reducing maintenance, but it often causes additional problems.

Problems Associated with Improper Mulching

• Deep mulch can lead to excess moisture in the root zone, which can stress the plant and cause root rot.
• Piling mulch against the trunk or stems of plants can stress stem tissues and may lead to insect and disease problems.
• Some mulches, especially those containing cut grass, can affect soil pH. Continued use of certain mulches over long periods can lead to micronutrient deficiencies or toxicities.
• Mulch piled high against the trunks of young trees may create habitats for rodents that chew the bark and can girdle the trees.
• Thick blankets of fine mulch can become matted, and may prevent the penetration of water and air. In addition, a thick layer of fine mulch can become like potting soil and may support weed growth.
• Anaerobic "sour" mulch may give off pungent odors, and the alcohols and organic acids that build up may be toxic to young plants.


Proper Mulching

It is clear that the choice of mulch and the method of application can be important to the health of landscape plants. The following are some guidelines to use when applying mulch.

• Inspect plants and soil in the area to be mulched. Determine whether drainage is adequate. Determine whether there are plants that may be affected by the choice of mulch. Most commonly available mulches work well in most landscapes. Some plants may benefit from the use of a slightly acidifying mulch such as pine bark.
• If mulch is already present, check the depth. Do not add mulch if there is a sufficient layer in place. Rake the old mulch to break up any matted layers and to refresh the appearance. Some landscape maintenance companies spray mulch with a water soluble vegetable-based dye to improve the appearance.
• If mulch is piled against the stems or tree trunks, pull it back several inches so that the base of the trunk and the root crown is exposed.
• Organic mulches are usually preferred to inorganic materials due to their soil-enhancing properties. If organic mulch is used, it should be well aerated, and preferably, composted. Avoid sour-smelling mulch.
• Composted wood chips can make good mulch, especially when they contain a blend of leaves, bark, and wood. Fresh wood chips may also be used around established trees and shrubs. Avoid using non-composted wood chips that have been piled deeply without exposure to oxygen.
• For well-drained sites, apply a 2-4 inch layer. If there are drainage problems, a thinner layer should be used. Avoid placing mulch against the tree trunks. Place mulch out to the tree’s drip line or beyond.

http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/mulching.asp

:)

Lawnchoice
12-06-2004, 08:32 AM
Turfco Edge R Rite with the tree ring blade

OR

Take some rope, tie it around the truck and then around a marking paint can. Move around the base of the tree carefully and paint around. Then edge with a spade and you are there!

Mulch with the guidelines provided above from Coffeecraver.

YardPro
12-06-2004, 09:20 AM
tie a string loosely around the tree, then use a inverted paint gun tied to the other end to mark the circle, then cut it in however you wish. (we use a brown)

impactlandscaping
12-20-2004, 09:12 AM
tie a string loosely around the tree, then use a inverted paint gun tied to the other end to mark the circle, then cut it in however you wish. (we use a brown)


Ditto!!! :D

out4now
12-20-2004, 11:48 AM
tie a string loosely around the tree, then use a inverted paint gun tied to the other end to mark the circle, then cut it in however you wish. (we use a brown)

That's how I did them as well.

Groundcover Solutions
12-23-2004, 04:49 AM
Tree ring is a four letter work to us mulch blowers. The most time consuming yet material lacking thing we can do. We just wing it with the tree rings as long as you eye ball it, it will look good. no one can tell that it is not exactly a perfict ring. Once you get the hang of it then they all will look uniform. On a smaller scale though I would continue to use the techniques described above. If you are able to dedicate the time then go for it. the better the quility the happier the customer will be. but when you are doing 500 of them you may not want to take 20min on each one. JMO

Lawnchoice
12-23-2004, 08:18 AM
Tree ring is a four letter work to us mulch blowers. The most time consuming yet material lacking thing we can do. We just wing it with the tree rings as long as you eye ball it, it will look good. no one can tell that it is not exactly a perfict ring. Once you get the hang of it then they all will look uniform. On a smaller scale though I would continue to use the techniques described above. If you are able to dedicate the time then go for it. the better the quility the happier the customer will be. but when you are doing 500 of them you may not want to take 20min on each one. JMO

For proper tree health a " cut " around the tree is needed. Blowing bark for the tree rings is so much easier than the wheelbarrow method! I know, we sub out a bark blower for larger jobs.

GreenMonster
12-23-2004, 08:34 AM
For proper tree health a " cut " around the tree is needed. Blowing bark for the tree rings is so much easier than the wheelbarrow method! I know, we sub out a bark blower for larger jobs.

Nate

Who do you use for bark blowing?

Lawnchoice
12-23-2004, 08:42 AM
Mark, we used Outdoor Pride - over in Manchester and also Bennett Landscape from Hampstead.

Not sure who has them on the coast. I have had long term relationships with these guys so that is why they come out for a weekend or two.

Probably won't use them this year as I have eliminate a lot of the mulch work with new planting and wildflower seed, etc. etc.

What's up for today?

GreenMonster
12-23-2004, 08:46 AM
Mark, we used Outdoor Pride - over in Manchester and also Bennett Landscape from Hampstead.

Not sure who has them on the coast. I have had long term relationships with these guys so that is why they come out for a weekend or two.

Probably won't use them this year as I have eliminate a lot of the mulch work with new planting and wildflower seed, etc. etc.

What's up for today?

I think Cameron's up in Farmington offers it now too, FWIW. I hate to sub it out though, it's a good money maker.

Today, it's back to "real" job. I'm finishing up planning a big job for us (company I work for) that will be the first two weeks of Jan. down in NY.

Also, I have Lasik surgery at 2:15! Wish me luck!

Lawnchoice
12-23-2004, 09:29 AM
I think Cameron's up in Farmington offers it now too, FWIW. I hate to sub it out though, it's a good money maker.

Today, it's back to "real" job. I'm finishing up planning a big job for us (company I work for) that will be the first two weeks of Jan. down in NY.

Also, I have Lasik surgery at 2:15! Wish me luck!

I also hate to sub anything out either!

Good luck with the Lasik. My right eye changed two weeks ago so I am knocked out for the next two years!! The new contacts are great though.

Have a nice holiday.

GreenMonster
12-23-2004, 09:38 AM
I also hate to sub anything out either!

Good luck with the Lasik. My right eye changed two weeks ago so I am knocked out for the next two years!! The new contacts are great though.

Have a nice holiday.


They say I'm a "great" candidate. I bet they say that to everyone :rolleyes:

I'll let you know how it goes.

Have a great holiday!

Groundcover Solutions
12-23-2004, 11:35 PM
Don't knock subbing work out too much. You can make a pretty penny by subbing out landscape material apps. You can "over sell" try and land the larger jobs that you would not normally do, or have the capabilities to do. Then all you have to do is call your subcontractor and he takes care of the rest. You don't lift a finger and yet you are making good money. JMO... I May be slightly biased though LOL

Braxton
01-17-2005, 11:26 AM
Ok I'm new to this, so this may seem basic, but how do you sub out a job? I mean, do you bill the customer and the sub bills you? How does this work?

Thanks.

Braxton

Groundcover Solutions
01-18-2005, 05:11 PM
In our case we would give you a price per yard say $35 indluding mulch. You would aprove it and send a purchase order. You then write up your bill for the customer for say $55 per yard and then once we have compleated the work you would bill the customer for the $55 per yard. We would then send you an Invoice for our $35 per yard. so you make $20 per yard on the deal and all you had to do was give us a call.

Old Hippy
04-21-2005, 04:12 PM
I take some old rubber garden hose and put it around the tree till I get the circle that looks good to me.

Paint just inside the garden hose and the hose leaves a nice sharp line

Start at the tree with a Turfco Edge R Rite set at one inch deep. Go around a few times gradually going deeper. The unit has 4 settings 1 inch to 4 inch deep. When I get out to my circle I go to the 4 inch deep setting and make one final pass at 4 inches. the rest are at 1, 2 & 3.

I rake up most of the clippings. (green stuff and roots) Then make a nice cone with the dirt that is loose.

Put down my barrier then the mulch. I have a nice cone, a 4 inch wall to hold the mulch all in a perfect circle and total time of about ten minutes.

The machine is the deal cuts better than a shovel and way faster.

Old Hippy

LB1234
04-24-2005, 09:34 PM
Don't knock subbing work out too much. You can make a pretty penny by subbing out landscape material apps. You can "over sell" try and land the larger jobs that you would not normally do, or have the capabilities to do. Then all you have to do is call your subcontractor and he takes care of the rest. You don't lift a finger and yet you are making good money. JMO... I May be slightly biased though LOL


Not as easy as it seems, at least for one of our scenarios. We contract out our pesticide/herbicide work since we do NOT have the license. To try and make this long story short...

According to my insurance agent, to CYA, I need to have the subcontractor add me as an 'additional' insured to their policy AND their policy needs to have, at a minimum, equal to or greater than the values of my insurance coverage. In addition, the subcontractor must sign a 'hold harmless' agreement. Needless to say it took almost two weeks for everything to et run by both companies, both insurance agents and not to mention my trip to my attorney to review the hold harmless agreement!

That's to just get started. Then the job comes up and you need to coordinate w/ this company so that we do not mow until the application is 'watered in'. It's okay for the commercial establishments, just turn on the sprinkler system...most residents don't have sprinkler systems.

Well, they performed there first service of applying granules. The idiots applicator used a broadcast spreader in some grassy areas that are only 2-3' wide! The a-hole then didn't even bother to take a backpack blower and clean off the walkways and driveways he hit with the application. Worst is, I get a phone call from one client asking me why WE (rightfully so, we chose them for the subcontract) we didn't clean up after applying the fertilizer. Not to mention we did two plant installs and the plants started to turn brown from being hit with the post emergent weed killer. Needless to say I had to (b/c our reputation is on the line) show up the next day to blow all the walkways off and then we had to trim back the 10 (total) inkberry holly's we planted that started to loose there leaves.

So, yes, you are slightly biased...LOL :waving: