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RICHIE K
12-08-2004, 07:34 AM
TODAY I HAD A CUSTOMER CALL AND SHE STATED THAT SHE WANTED TO BUY A GIFT CERTIFICATE FOR HER MOM. SHE WANTED TO PAY FOR THE SEASON OF 2005, I FIGURED THE BILL OUT FOR THE WORST AND SHE SAID THATS FINE. SO THE WIFE MADE A GIFT CERTIFICATE FOR HER AND SHE PAID FOR THE WHOLE YEAR. ANY ONE EVER DO GIFT CERT. :)


RICHIE K

www.kulakandcompany.com :blob3:

cward
12-08-2004, 09:18 AM
Man is that sweet. I never have before, but I sure would.

twins_lawn_care
12-08-2004, 10:19 AM
I did one of those this past year for a Father's Day gift. the mom and daugher bought it for their dad, so he could have the summer off. Nice gift, and worked out well. Paid in full prior to starting work, and also landed additional dethatching and aerating there. Would be a nice thing to advertise this time of year...
Why not give them the year off for Christmas!

out4now
12-08-2004, 11:36 AM
That's actually a really cool idea, bet the senoir citizens out here would love to get a gift like that. What do you include in them, basic service and then sell add ons?

CamLand
12-08-2004, 12:14 PM
I get a number of those for snow plowing as holiday Gifts,give the parent the snow season off...

Evan528
12-08-2004, 12:19 PM
I have a client who every christmas buys a gift cetificate from me to give to his widowed mother for a year worth of lawn maintnance. Nice getting that lumpsome in off season but the only downside is that I feel like im doing her lawn for free all year. :dizzy:

HOOLIE
12-08-2004, 04:39 PM
That could be a good marketing strategy as well, advertise that you do gift certificates, some people might not want a lawn service but might be interested in a gift for a relative.

Lux Lawn
12-08-2004, 04:49 PM
Yes but never for the whole season like that.

RICHIE K
12-08-2004, 09:08 PM
OUT4NOW

ITS JUST THE BASIC MOWING, EDGING AND TRIMMING. ANYTHING ELSE IS EXTRA. LIKE CLEAN UPS ETC....


RICHIE K

www.kulakandcompany.com :blob3:

Lawnchoice
12-08-2004, 09:13 PM
I sold 3 fall cleanup gift certificates this year. I base all cleanups ( well most ) on an hourly rate and the gc's were 3 hour time slots and the giftee was billed the overage.

Neat idea, I might consider promoting it more next season.

JarrodsDad
12-09-2004, 02:48 PM
We recieved a call today for a gift certificate for Christmas. The daughter would like to give a summer of mowing to her Father for Christmas.

The daughter would like to have her father's grass cut once a week for three months. Twelve cuts, according to yard size, $300.00

I told her, and she agreed, that we would get her to sign a contract to pay for the cuts and provide a gift certificate to give to her father. The contract is no different than a regular customer.

Now the problem ...

I told her I would bill her on a monthly basis. :blush: Don't know why I didn't demand cash up front, but I didn't .

They will have a gift certificate and I will have nothing until the first 4 cuts are done. I know I should have asked for pay up front, but seeing I may be taking on another long term customer, I thought it was the right way to go.

Any thoughts on the idea...or what a gift certificate/contract should look like?

YardPro
12-09-2004, 03:33 PM
i have been toying with this very idea.

we have a few customers that buy individual services for others, but none that do a season's maintenance.

midtnstone
12-09-2004, 04:37 PM
the good thing about gift cert. is that you can date them. By this i mean go to the mall and buy a gift cert. for somebody it is usually only good for like 30 days but this wont work for year long service but for hedge trimming, mulch, ect this will work. It is a known fact that the reason that they are dated people get busy forget about it or whatever but they still made your money regardless. Dept. stores make a whole lot of money off this little idea.

Evergreenpros
12-09-2004, 10:27 PM
We recieved a call today for a gift certificate for Christmas. The daughter would like to give a summer of mowing to her Father for Christmas.

The daughter would like to have her father's grass cut once a week for three months. Twelve cuts, according to yard size, $300.00

I told her, and she agreed, that we would get her to sign a contract to pay for the cuts and provide a gift certificate to give to her father. The contract is no different than a regular customer.

Now the problem ...

I told her I would bill her on a monthly basis. :blush: Don't know why I didn't demand cash up front, but I didn't .

They will have a gift certificate and I will have nothing until the first 4 cuts are done. I know I should have asked for pay up front, but seeing I may be taking on another long term customer, I thought it was the right way to go.

Any thoughts on the idea...or what a gift certificate/contract should look like?

When a customer purchases a gift certificate the "contract" is between You (the lco) and the purchasing customer. It isn't between you and the person who receives the gift. This changes the dynamics of a contract greatly.

Legally you only have to provide what is stated on the gift certificate or what you and the purchaser agreed upon. There should be some "value" on the certificate, whether it's number of mows, hours of work, etc. This will help your case if there is no contract and if the purchaser tries to sue you.

In your case when there was no exchange of anything, you really aren't obligated to abide by the contract. One sided contracts are unenforcable in almost all, if not all states. So if you're worried you have to provide them with 4 weeks of service for free, you don't.

Best place to put all gift certificate information is ON the gift certificate. This clears up most confusion, especially since there is a many month, sometimes 1 year+ lag time before people utilize the gift.

Have a no refund clause. Prevents the person who gets the gift from calling you up and wanting the cash.

Have a "no value" clause, just state this gift certificate has no value other than what is stated. Prevents the person who gets the gift from applying the "value" of the gift to other services, unless you allow them too.

Be clear about what you are going to do for them, e.g. mow yard 1x per week for 12 consecutive weeks at 12345 Elm Street, Anytown, USA. Don't even list trim, edge, blow etc etc. Mention consecutive weeks because you'll get someone who will have you mow 2x a year for 6 years.

There's a lot of money to be made on gift certificates. Since only about 75% are redeemed you can miscalculate on some and still be just fine.

Carolina Cutter
12-10-2004, 12:38 AM
When a customer purchases a gift certificate the "contract" is between You (the lco) and the purchasing customer. It isn't between you and the person who receives the gift. This changes the dynamics of a contract greatly.

Legally you only have to provide what is stated on the gift certificate or what you and the purchaser agreed upon. There should be some "value" on the certificate, whether it's number of mows, hours of work, etc. This will help your case if there is no contract and if the purchaser tries to sue you.

In your case when there was no exchange of anything, you really aren't obligated to abide by the contract. One sided contracts are unenforcable in almost all, if not all states. So if you're worried you have to provide them with 4 weeks of service for free, you don't.

Best place to put all gift certificate information is ON the gift certificate. This clears up most confusion, especially since there is a many month, sometimes 1 year+ lag time before people utilize the gift.

Have a no refund clause. Prevents the person who gets the gift from calling you up and wanting the cash.

Have a "no value" clause, just state this gift certificate has no value other than what is stated. Prevents the person who gets the gift from applying the "value" of the gift to other services, unless you allow them too.

Be clear about what you are going to do for them, e.g. mow yard 1x per week for 12 consecutive weeks at 12345 Elm Street, Anytown, USA. Don't even list trim, edge, blow etc etc. Mention consecutive weeks because you'll get someone who will have you mow 2x a year for 6 years.

There's a lot of money to be made on gift certificates. Since only about 75% are redeemed you can miscalculate on some and still be just fine.

Right on the money......never thought about doing this but I am going to make up a flyer and see what happens. Wish me luck!!!

JarrodsDad
12-15-2004, 11:16 AM
When a customer purchases a gift certificate the "contract" is between You (the lco) and the purchasing customer. It isn't between you and the person who receives the gift. This changes the dynamics of a contract greatly.

Legally you only have to provide what is stated on the gift certificate or what you and the purchaser agreed upon. There should be some "value" on the certificate, whether it's number of mows, hours of work, etc. This will help your case if there is no contract and if the purchaser tries to sue you.

In your case when there was no exchange of anything, you really aren't obligated to abide by the contract. One sided contracts are unenforcable in almost all, if not all states. So if you're worried you have to provide them with 4 weeks of service for free, you don't.

Best place to put all gift certificate information is ON the gift certificate. This clears up most confusion, especially since there is a many month, sometimes 1 year+ lag time before people utilize the gift.

Have a no refund clause. Prevents the person who gets the gift from calling you up and wanting the cash.

Have a "no value" clause, just state this gift certificate has no value other than what is stated. Prevents the person who gets the gift from applying the "value" of the gift to other services, unless you allow them too.

Be clear about what you are going to do for them, e.g. mow yard 1x per week for 12 consecutive weeks at 12345 Elm Street, Anytown, USA. Don't even list trim, edge, blow etc etc. Mention consecutive weeks because you'll get someone who will have you mow 2x a year for 6 years.

There's a lot of money to be made on gift certificates. Since only about 75% are redeemed you can miscalculate on some and still be just fine.

This is what we have placed on the draft gift certificate so far.

"Mowing services are priced on a seven day cycle and service is provided on that basis with due regard for weather conditions. Certificates indicating more than one week of mowing service are understood to be consecutive weeks. Certificate holder is responsible for any additional charges for services other than those explicitly stated on this certificate. Discounts are included in certificates. Services and gift certificates are not transferable and are not redeemable for cash. "

Anything else we should include?

JarrodsDad
12-15-2004, 11:18 AM
Is it better to specify the service on the gift certificate or should it be for a dollar amount?

Without seeing the property and doing an estimate I think specifying a service for a fixed dolar amount is a dangerous practice.

gene gls
12-15-2004, 11:43 AM
The worst problem with "gift certificates" is most times you will be out side of your normal route and waste time traveling.

Gene

JarrodsDad
12-15-2004, 08:58 PM
Certificates indicating more than one week of mowing service are understood to be consecutive weeks. Mowing services are priced on a seven day cycle and service is provided on that basis with due regard for weather conditions. Services and gift certificates are not transferable and are not redeemable for cash. Certificates can be issued as a dollar amount or a service specific. When the service is specified then any charges over and above the purchase price of the certificate become the responsibility of the certificate holder. Discounts on multiple services are included in the certificates. Certificate holder is responsible for any additional charges for services other than those explicitly stated on this certificate.

Anything else that should be on the gift certificate?

JimLewis
12-15-2004, 10:31 PM
I don't usually make out an official gift certificate any more. But yes, we have people do this fairly regularly. I bet I get a call like that about 5-10 times per year. Sometimes, people want to buy their family member an entire year of service, other times they just want to buy them a one-time clean-up. Sometimes it's just 3 or 6 months of service.

As long as they pay in advance, I am always happy to oblige! payup payup payup