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desert rose gardening
12-13-2004, 11:37 AM
I have tried a lot of different brands of broad leaf weed killers, mainly the ones from home stores. I don't have a big demand for it. What would you say is the best from your experiences? Thanks for the advice.

sildoc
12-13-2004, 12:20 PM
Depends on the specific weed or weeds you are trying to kill. Where these weeds are at. And time of year trying to kill weeds.

In Grassy areas There are hundreds of broadleaf killers. I like it simple and wont strain unless I get some weeds that just wont die. I use 2-4-D Amine. Fairly broad spectrum of broadleaf weeds and is very cheap, about 16 bucks a gallon.

In non grassy areas that you can kill everything..... Glyphosate wether it be round up, Mirage, or an off brand.

captaingreen
12-13-2004, 12:22 PM
Well it really depends on what your trying to control. Ester based formulations tend to work well on difficult to control weeds, however they become volatile with warmer temps., so you've got to be careful. The old standby Trimec works well for many common easy to control broadleafs, which is an amine formulation, not as volatile. Hope this helps.

captaingreen
12-13-2004, 12:23 PM
Depends on the specific weed or weeds you are trying to kill. Where these weeds are at. And time of year trying to kill weeds.

In Grassy areas There are hundreds of broadleaf killers. I like it simple and wont strain unless I get some weeds that just wont die. I use 2-4-D Amine. Fairly broad spectrum of broadleaf weeds and is very cheap, about 16 bucks a gallon.

In non grassy areas that you can kill everything..... Glyphosate wether it be round up, Mirage, or an off brand.
We must have posted at the same time, good suggestion!

qps
12-13-2004, 06:11 PM
I have tried a lot of different brands of broad leaf weed killers, mainly the ones from home stores. I don't have a big demand for it. What would you say is the best from your experiences? Thanks for the advice.


Advice.....get certified and you won't be asking these questions :rolleyes:

toxic man
12-16-2004, 02:53 PM
Oh please,

Certification, is that the magic gate to the label? Give the guy (or Girl) a break, he is asking an experience question, so stop with the get licensed or certified. I am, and I can tell you the ONLY thing that proves is that you have the tenacity to pass the testing requirements, then there comes the experience. I don't know what it is about this web site, I have seen a smattering of members who comment about this site being so negative, and, they do not really participate in the posting of threads on a consistent basis. I always wondered what stimulated this culture? There is a tremendous pool of extremely talented people who respond to this site and those people are very helpful; they seem to enjoy helping with the experience questions.

So, being one of the licensed, insured, tested and completely legal participants of this site, I can attest to the fact that that certification test proves nothing more than being able to pass an observe test on a given day, that's it. Get off it.

And the answer to the question is there are many products for broad leaf control, more than able to describe. I like speed zone in the grass, but that depends on the species of grass, the target weed and the ambient temp. So what are the specifics of your request, locations timing and application. There is a lot of information on the label, and some information from practical experience that you can get here!

I like this web site, there are just sometimes so many negative worthless comments that really bog it down. Lets all help each other out, this can be an extremely technical industry and I have yet to find the guy who knows it all.

So, unless Sean is going to keep all of the unlicensed people out of here, give the answers, if it is illegal for them to get or apply the materials, that is on them.

Lou
Weed Solutions

James Cormier
12-16-2004, 03:51 PM
Oh please,

Certification, is that the magic gate to the label? Give the guy (or Girl) a break, he is asking an experience question, so stop with the get licensed or certified. I am, and I can tell you the ONLY thing that proves is that you have the tenacity to pass the testing requirements, then there comes the experience. I don't know what it is about this web site, I have seen a smattering of members who comment about this site being so negative, and, they do not really participate in the posting of threads on a consistent basis. I always wondered what stimulated this culture? There is a tremendous pool of extremely talented people who respond to this site and those people are very helpful; they seem to enjoy helping with the experience questions.

So, being one of the licensed, insured, tested and completely legal participants of this site, I can attest to the fact that that certification test proves nothing more than being able to pass an observe test on a given day, that's it. Get off it.

And the answer to the question is there are many products for broad leaf control, more than able to describe. I like speed zone in the grass, but that depends on the species of grass, the target weed and the ambient temp. So what are the specifics of your request, locations timing and application. There is a lot of information on the label, and some information from practical experience that you can get here!

I like this web site, there are just sometimes so many negative worthless comments that really bog it down. Lets all help each other out, this can be an extremely technical industry and I have yet to find the guy who knows it all.

So, unless Sean is going to keep all of the unlicensed people out of here, give the answers, if it is illegal for them to get or apply the materials, that is on them.

Lou
Weed Solutions

Lou, I couldn't dis agree with you more, Im not going to argue with you either, but your post is far more negative then the one your complaining about.

I will say this, the ones that complain about this issue are the unlicensed ones

qps
12-16-2004, 04:11 PM
Lou, I couldn't dis agree with you more, Im not going to argue with you either, but your post is far more negative then the one your complaining about.

I will say this, the ones that complain about this issue are the unlicensed ones

I agree, how many of these same post do you see???? how do I do this or how do I do that, I don't mind any legitimate question, but when someone ask for the tenth time "how do I kill a dandelion" it tells me that this site has mostly wannabe's that aren't investing in the time or money to learn how to do "it right"...everyone with a truck and a walk behind is "in business" they usually aren't properly insured, and or trained...most are gone within a few years...so yeah I'm losing alittle patience with the "wannabe's"

qps
12-16-2004, 04:15 PM
Also Lou, you support what I was saying when you asked what type of grass, target weed and temps...ect... in your answer... :rolleyes:

bobbygedd
12-16-2004, 04:52 PM
the certification tests do NOT educate you on the type of chemicals to use. that only comes with further training and/or experience

Ric
12-16-2004, 05:17 PM
the certification tests do NOT educate you on the type of chemicals to use. that only comes with further training and/or experience


BooBy

You are right about that in most states.

However in My state you had better have your Poop in a group. 50% of the people taking the Fla. Cert Test fail. And most are taking it for the 3rd or 4th time. They also had to have worked under a certified operator for at least 3 years or have a degree in Horticulture.

toxic man
12-16-2004, 07:23 PM
Hey you guys,

I took my test in Ca., and the pass rate was less than 17%. The day they gave my test, 380 people took the test and only 15 people passed enough sections to actually open a business. So, being successful at passing the test and also seeing the test, I have the first hand knowledge to say, that test has nothing to do with this business, period. There was no questions about the simplest of terms in this business such as even whether a grass is a warm or cool season grass. How much more basic can you be?

So what qualifies some one to ask a question, is it:

1. the age of the question author
2. the licensure status of the question asker
3. the amount of experience of the question asker
4. whether or not the question asker has enough insurance to ask a question
5. the I.Q. of the question asker
6. the amount of business of the question asker
7. whether or not the question asker uses spell check?
8. whether or not the author drives a chevy or a ford?

So what is it?

Jim, I totally love your stuff, you have a business which I really am striving to
emulate. I think all of your invoices and brochures are awesome, I have used them as models for my own company. I think your website is really a great resource and I wish to have one like that someday soon. I value your opinion I will-not argue with your either, I have too much respect for your business sense than that. Sometimes this website just feels more like a boys club for the few that monitor every few hours, than an educational networking site. Sometimes I wished Sean would have pre-requisites to be a member here, But then again, I used this site as a resource to get my own business started and that I am very thankful for.

So when someone asks a questions no matter how trivial it is, there are many ways to answer, I just disagree with the non-helpful angle.

"Just my thoughts, There is no Tone to this post, just my If I offended any one....well tough sh#t"
Jim

See what I mean,

Humbly
Lou
Weed Solutions Inc

James Cormier
12-16-2004, 07:53 PM
Hey you guys,

I took my test in Ca., and the pass rate was less than 17%. The day they gave my test, 380 people took the test and only 15 people passed enough sections to actually open a business. So, being successful at passing the test and also seeing the test, I have the first hand knowledge to say, that test has nothing to do with this business, period. There was no questions about the simplest of terms in this business such as even whether a grass is a warm or cool season grass. How much more basic can you be?

So what qualifies some one to ask a question, is it:

1. the age of the question author
2. the licensure status of the question asker
3. the amount of experience of the question asker
4. whether or not the question asker has enough insurance to ask a question
5. the I.Q. of the question asker
6. the amount of business of the question asker
7. whether or not the question asker uses spell check?
8. whether or not the author drives a chevy or a ford?

So what is it?

Jim, I totally love your stuff, you have a business which I really am striving to
emulate. I think all of your invoices and brochures are awesome, I have used them as models for my own company. I think your website is really a great resource and I wish to have one like that someday soon. I value your opinion I will-not argue with your either, I have too much respect for your business sense than that. Sometimes this website just feels more like a boys club for the few that monitor every few hours, than an educational networking site. Sometimes I wished Sean would have pre-requisites to be a member here, But then again, I used this site as a resource to get my own business started and that I am very thankful for.

So when someone asks a questions no matter how trivial it is, there are many ways to answer, I just disagree with the non-helpful angle.

"Just my thoughts, There is no Tone to this post, just my If I offended any one....well tough sh#t"
Jim

See what I mean,

Humbly
Lou
Weed Solutions Inc

I hear ya lou, at least you made me laugh with the end of your post :D there are many times I read a post, and I just cringe and move on, and I wonder how somebody could not respond in a negative way. then I move on.

I do think it is very easy to tell by a question that the asker really has no clue about the proper use of pesticides. And it may not be too negative to suggest getting licensed and trained.

No need to be humbled, oh toxic one ( I was gonna insert a skull & cross bones smiley but couldn't find one )

Jim

qps
12-16-2004, 11:39 PM
Hey you guys,

I took my test in Ca., and the pass rate was less than 17%. The day they gave my test, 380 people took the test and only 15 people passed enough sections to actually open a business. So, being successful at passing the test and also seeing the test, I have the first hand knowledge to say, that test has nothing to do with this business, period. There was no questions about the simplest of terms in this business such as even whether a grass is a warm or cool season grass. How much more basic can you be?

So what qualifies some one to ask a question, is it:

1. the age of the question author
2. the licensure status of the question asker
3. the amount of experience of the question asker
4. whether or not the question asker has enough insurance to ask a question
5. the I.Q. of the question asker
6. the amount of business of the question asker
7. whether or not the question asker uses spell check?
8. whether or not the author drives a chevy or a ford?

So what is it?

Jim, I totally love your stuff, you have a business which I really am striving to
emulate. I think all of your invoices and brochures are awesome, I have used them as models for my own company. I think your website is really a great resource and I wish to have one like that someday soon. I value your opinion I will-not argue with your either, I have too much respect for your business sense than that. Sometimes this website just feels more like a boys club for the few that monitor every few hours, than an educational networking site. Sometimes I wished Sean would have pre-requisites to be a member here, But then again, I used this site as a resource to get my own business started and that I am very thankful for.

So when someone asks a questions no matter how trivial it is, there are many ways to answer, I just disagree with the non-helpful angle.

"Just my thoughts, There is no Tone to this post, just my If I offended any one....well tough sh#t"
Jim

See what I mean,

Humbly
Lou
Weed Solutions Inc

Nice.... :sleeping:

AlpineNaturescapes
12-24-2004, 04:45 AM
Cool your jets people.
Only one person has suggested a chemical.
Forget the retail stuff - it's watered down garbage.
As a general rule, this order should do you well.
Spring - Trimec or equivalent.
Speed Zone was also suggested.
Early Summer - Turflon Ester. Works great on clover, mallow, and spurge. Slower on dandelions but should finish off anything left from spring spray.
This advice is worth a ton. Use Lesco, Wilbur-Ellis or other commercial supplier. Ask them questions. Be careful with this stuff around evergreens - they hate it.

Ric
12-24-2004, 09:29 AM
Forget the retail stuff - it's watered down garbage.


Alpine

Don't be so sure of that statement. Homeowner Atrazine (broad leaf herbicide for C-4 turf) is actually stronger than commercial. Most other GUP pesticides are the same strength.

We are paid for our knowledge and not for the product we use. That is why Homeowners are not as successful with Pesticides. They use the wrong one in the wrong place. It is the old case of not what you use but how you use it.

Triple R
12-27-2004, 08:46 PM
Licensing in CA only means you past the tests and can read the label, which I did years ago. When I was applying for my license I was shocked at how little you have to know to be licensed, and I knew very little. After becoming licensed by the state of California I didn't know anything, stuggled on my own for about an year then when to work for a local fert & squirt company for a couple of years where I finally got familiar whith various chemicals. I burned out on that job and am know on my own again doing full service landscape management and will be adding next year a chemical only service.

So here is some of what I know for lawns don't use turflon ester on bermuda, especially on hybrid (severe damage, from experience), it will also damage certain trees like camphors, so avoid spraying under tree canopies. I like speedzone but powerzone was better until it got redflagged in CA. Trimec is also good but I think it's more toxic. I also prefer pesticides with low of no odor, strong odors from spaying seems to call attention to yourself and get people paranoid. When selecting a pesticide look for the least toxic category 3 "caution label", One of the reasons I quit my job was that the broadleaf herbicides we used were danger labels.

Ric
12-27-2004, 10:30 PM
Licensing in CA only means you past the tests and can read the label, which I did years ago. When I was applying for my license I was shocked at how little you have to know to be licensed, and I knew very little.

Green Frog

CA has one of the harder tests in the country to pass. Now this is one of the biggest problems in our industry. Lack of real knowledge.

We will always be seen as Lawn Boys as long as industry standards and State laws allow any loser to have a pesticide license.

Triple R
12-27-2004, 11:10 PM
We will always be seen as Lawn Boys as long as industry standards and State laws allow any loser to have a pesticide license.



I attended a study course at the UC extension and a few years later took another course at the local junior college taught by a county ag inspector, several months after that I took the both tests and past, but I still hadn't been taught anything about available pesticides and their uses or the various types of sprayers and methods of applications. It's like the state expects you to figure this out on your own. Since obtaining my license I have taken most of the horticulture classes offer at the local college. Just to clear things up, I live in an ag county (one of the top producers on the nation) unlike the east coast I have to buy my chemicals through local ag chemical companies because there in no support locally for t&o applicators.

James Cormier
12-28-2004, 07:52 AM
It's like the state expects you to figure this out on your own. .

Very simple answer.......YES!!!!

Wait a minute, now you think the state should train you on how to do your job?

j fisher
12-28-2004, 09:21 AM
the certification tests do NOT educate you on the type of chemicals to use. that only comes with further training and/or experience

True. The certification test deals primarily with the legal and safety aspects of chemical apps.

ThreeWide
12-28-2004, 10:04 AM
In Georgia you must pass two tests. General standards is part 1 which covers the items you folks were discussing such as reading labels and calibrating equipment.

You then must pass a second test which concentrates on your particular specialization. Most here would take Turf and Ornamental, which is a rather difficult test. To be successful, you must know the following for example:

Turf insects and control methods
Turf diseases and control methods
Common weeds and what herbicides control them
Ornamental pests and diseases
Proper tree pruning techniques
Deciduous tree diseases
Pine bettles

IMO, by passing the test you have already distinguished yourself among the crowd. This does not make you an expert by any means, but it provides a good base of knowledge.

Ric
12-28-2004, 10:55 AM
We will always be seen as Lawn Boys as long as industry standards and State laws allow any loser to have a pesticide license.


No it is not the states certification test, responsibility to educate. It is however the states responsibility to insure those who passes their test are educated.

Now even My state that requires 3 years working experience under the direction of a certified operator allows a few Idiots to slip on by. This generally happen when people try and beat the system by holding card instead actually working in the industry.

Now anyone who actually works in the pesticide industry for 3 years, should gain alot of knowledge about what and when to use a chemical. One of the first things they should learn is price of services in their area. How many times do we see Question on HOW MUCH SHOULD I CHARGE. If you don't know the price, then you sure as Heck don't know what to apply or what you are applying it on.

Of course, those of us that already have a certificate, want the test made harder. Those who don't have a certificate want it made easier.

Triple R
12-28-2004, 01:20 PM
Train no, but like I mentioned locally there is zero support for turf & ornamental applicators. The nearest non-ag chem supplier is about 50 miles away and they are geared towards structural pest control. There is a Lesco in San Jose but that's about a 3.5 hour drive each way. Any local spraying equipment is made for ag use so the retailer can't really supply me with any useful t&O recomemdations. It would be great if there was Lesco in the area so I could just drive up and let them recomend a spraying and fert program but like I said there is no local support, that's probably why I can easily count the local squirt n fert companies in one hand and still have have fingers to spare.

Ric
12-28-2004, 07:57 PM
GreenFrog

There are many universities that have on line turf and horticulture programs. Purdue and Georgia Tech are two I can think of that offer certificates.