PDA

View Full Version : going under sidewalks


Branchland
12-15-2004, 06:19 PM
I've got about 30 feet of 4 inch corrigated drainpipe to run from a downspout. The only problem is I've got to go under a sidewalk. The sidewalk is 3 feet wide but I've got to go at a angle so it'll probaly be about 4 feet. Any ideas on the best way to go under it?

ztoro
12-15-2004, 06:28 PM
I've got about 30 feet of 4 inch corrigated drainpipe to run from a downspout. The only problem is I've got to go under a sidewalk. The sidewalk is 3 feet wide but I've got to go at a angle so it'll probaly be about 4 feet. Any ideas on the best way to go under it?


get some 3/4 inch pvc, you would need like 2 or 3 feet.. make it so the one end can attach to a hose and on the other end put a cap and drill a hole as big as a pencil... Then you need to dig two holes on each side of the sidewalk where you want to start and end..... Use the pvc tool you built as a water pick to borrow out a hole.....

Or you can get yourself one of those small skinny shovels and dig out a hole....

i have had success both ways. The pvc method is a little muddy but is effortless... the shovel method is work.....

grassworks
12-15-2004, 06:30 PM
Some Companies specialize in boring under drives and sidewalks. Try the yellow pages under boring or you can rent a machine from most rental yards that will do the job if you feel adventerous.( ditch witch w/attachments) .

matthew horner
12-15-2004, 06:36 PM
Lowes sells a boring kit. IT is the tip you put on a pvc pipe. I did one through clay sand and gravel (30-40") and it took me about 25 mins including digging trench on both sides.

YardPro
12-15-2004, 06:46 PM
the pvc ideas are great EXCEPT he need to get a 4" drain pipe through there.

a nursery spade or trenching shovel is the bestbet.

out4now
12-15-2004, 06:58 PM
Hydrobore with a gardenhose and pressure nozzle.

Branchland
12-15-2004, 06:59 PM
The ground is packed red clay. Will the lowes boring kit go through that? And how much? I was just going to use a hand spade to dig it out but thought there might be a better way.

PLI1
12-15-2004, 07:00 PM
Ran into the exact same thing 2 years ago and had to run under a 5' wide sidewalk. Maybe this isn't the "textbook way to do it," but what we did is I had a guy dig 4-5 feet on each side and start burrowing from each side with a skinny trenching shovel. He dug half way on one side and half way on the other. After he got through, he cleaned it out so the 4" pipe would fit through. It worked well and it took about an hour. That was 2 years ago and all is still working great :)

YardPro
12-15-2004, 07:10 PM
Ran into the exact same thing 2 years ago and had to run under a 5' wide sidewalk. Maybe this isn't the "textbook way to do it," but what we did is I had a guy dig 4-5 feet on each side and start burrowing from each side with a skinny trenching shovel. He dug half way on one side and half way on the other. After he got through, he cleaned it out so the 4" pipe would fit through. It worked well and it took about an hour. That was 2 years ago and all is still working great :)


exactly what we do with large pipe like that

Critical Care
12-16-2004, 02:17 PM
I also wonder how well the hydraulic method works in packed clay. Suppose it would work little by little. No clay out here, just lava rock, basalt, and knuckle breaking jagged rocks. Along with the trenching shovel, I commonly use a 25 pound pry bar chisel. Punching that first hole all the way through is the toughest part, and sometimes you only have room to attack it from one end. Personally, I hate having to do this work.

YardPro
12-16-2004, 02:22 PM
the hydro works well if you only have the pipe that water is running through to get underneath.

the problem with the hydro and a large pipe, is that the material washed out has to have someplace to go. displacing a 5 foot section on 4" clay is alot of mud to displace.

out4now
12-16-2004, 04:07 PM
It's too small a job for this type of set up but when a company does a lot of this here they use a vacuum unit from ditch witch or vermeer or another company to remove the mud. The city has a sort of cable drive attachment on their trenchers that doesn't use any water. It works off of PTO. They are the only ones I've ever seen that use them.

Grassmechanic
12-16-2004, 04:13 PM
I use a post hole digger, the kind that you screw into the ground. I have several lengths of threaded pipe for the handle, depending on how far you need to go. A typical 4' sidewalk can be bored under in less than 1/2 hr.

YardPro
12-16-2004, 06:24 PM
It's too small a job for this type of set up but when a company does a lot of this here they use a vacuum unit from ditch witch or vermeer or another company to remove the mud. The city has a sort of cable drive attachment on their trenchers that doesn't use any water. It works off of PTO. They are the only ones I've ever seen that use them.


those are cool

for long bores, we sub out to a company that uses a "thumper". it's a compressor powered boring deal.

but for a sidewalk... WAY to cost prohibitave.

grassworks
12-16-2004, 07:44 PM
Good idea with the post hole diggers, have to remember that one.