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1MajorTom
12-17-2004, 04:38 PM
ok, lets say you have 10 expendible lawns, meaning you keep them because they are right by an existing account, but they aren't really accounts that you count as a real customer. They are just "fill in" type of work, very small lawns, just a cut and trim, never no extras. Basically it's not even worth the time, stamp, paper, and envelope to bill them monthly, and sometimes the lawns get skipped a few weeks because they aren't a priority. So the amount is really a measly amount, but since each lawn esimated only takes like 20 some minutes a month, you keep them. My question is this.... Has anyone ever tried to sell a full season prepay mow on really really small lawns? Take the average # of cuts they got this season, and go with that number. Do you think a customer that is used to being billed monthly will go for a prepay yearly amount which would be due by March 31st???

packerbacker
12-17-2004, 04:41 PM
Ive never tried it on any lawn. Im a little uncomfortable doing it. Average mows around here are 35 weeks. But what if they pay and for some reason you get 7-8 weeks of rain total. You have to dig into your pocket and reimburse at the end of the season. What if the moneys gone?

And what if for some reason you get over there and you have to double cut and bag it. How do you charge more since they already paid?

AL Inc
12-17-2004, 04:46 PM
Since you are approximating, it may get confusing down the road, say, if you get an overly dry or wet year. Chances are there will be arguments. I try to focus more on getting the extras from people. Even if I am making money on a "just cut" customer, I would rather devote that time to a full service customer.

Shawns Lawns
12-17-2004, 04:47 PM
If you are not able to get them to take any extra services from you i doubt they would want to prepay unless you offered a discount. :)

Frontier-Lawn
12-17-2004, 04:56 PM
i have in my new flyers is you prepay you get 5% off the total price as a + to get them to do it.

rodfather
12-17-2004, 05:43 PM
Ive never tried it on any lawn. Im a little uncomfortable doing it. And what if for some reason you get over there and you have to double cut and bag it. How do you charge more since they already paid?

Me too.

I have wrestled with doing prepay accounts for lawns year after year. And not just the expendible ones too, Jodi. I know in one breath that having that money up front is a real nice thing to know. But, like what if the situation changes dramatically?

I think I am like pb. I want the flexibility to "charge accordingly" each visit. Dunno...wish I had an answer.

ed2hess
12-17-2004, 05:43 PM
We have a lot of $20 per cut yards that are on 12 mo. payments...about $50 per month. We give them 10% off is they pay 100% up front. Our goal is to have everybody on contract but older people are most reluctant while new customer go 100%. The reason the per month goes well is they can pay us on line or bank transfer monthly and they never get involved with billing. We obviously like that a LOT.

packerbacker
12-17-2004, 05:49 PM
Me too.

I have wrestled with doing prepay accounts for lawns year after year. And not just the expendible ones too, Jodi. I know in one breath that having that money up front is a real nice thing to know. But, like what if the situation changes dramatically?

I think I am like pb. I want the flexibility to "charge accordingly". Dunno...wish I had an answer.





I know fertilizer companies around here do alot of discounts for customers that prepay and rod is right, the lure of instant money is strong but the risk is to great. I would say mowing is the only branch of this industry i wouldnt do it in.

rodfather
12-17-2004, 06:01 PM
I would say mowing is the only branch of this industry i wouldnt do it in.

I totally agree. Too many variables not only month to month, but week to week as well.

captaingreen
12-17-2004, 06:12 PM
I used to work for a company that offered 10% off for prepay, but that was with a fert. program, not mowing. I would also be hesitant to accept prepayment with mowing, too many variables. I know what your talking about though, I have a few like that. Being solo and having some lawns that take up to 3.5 hours it is kind of refreshing for me to have a 30 minute stop a few times a week. :)

J Hisch
12-17-2004, 06:17 PM
Here is a option for everyone. If you want pre-payment this is a good way to handel it. Get a retainer and bill against it. For example, if a client usually spends 3000.00 a season get 1000.00 on a retainer and bill against it. Once the retainer has been met then you can either bill with another retainer or bill monthly. Most people offer the prepayment to avoid using lines of credit at the bank and keep cash flows up untill recieveables hit. Hope this helps. This may only work with larger customers or one you have had a few years. We offer this both on Lawn Care and Snow plowing. Works well for me but you better have a great bookeeper.

HOOLIE
12-17-2004, 06:23 PM
As far as the mowing variables go, shouldn't it stand to reason that if your main thing is mowing, you should be able to make an educated guess as to what they are? Its not like grass is anything new to any of us. Just factor it into your pre-pay price.

I have 3 customers that pre-pay each season.

rodfather
12-17-2004, 06:29 PM
160 or so pre-pay mowing customers would make me nervous...or very happy. I just don't know?

packerbacker
12-17-2004, 06:32 PM
As far as the mowing variables go, shouldn't it stand to reason that if your main thing is mowing, you should be able to make an educated guess as to what they are? Its not like grass is anything new to any of us. Just factor it into your pre-pay price.

I have 3 customers that pre-pay each season.





We cant guess when and wont it rain. Thats the biggest thing with me. If i have to bag i charge more but i cant just guess on when that will be.

HOOLIE
12-17-2004, 06:39 PM
But you can't take an educated guess? Based on what you've seen from each lawn over the past few years?

Gatewayuser
12-17-2004, 06:40 PM
I would just bill monthly, and keep those smaller jobs you may think that they are not worth it but a couple of my customers like that are going to give me about $5,000-$10,000 each of additional work next year so I am happy I kept them!

packerbacker
12-17-2004, 06:42 PM
But you can't take an educated guess? Based on what you've seen from each lawn over the past few years?





I could if the weather pattern around here wasnt changing on a year to year basis. For example in 2003 we had 45 days over 90 degrees and 20 over 100. IN 2004 we had only 14 days over 90 and 2 over 100. Its been very screwy here for the last few years.

To me prepaying is the same as contracts. And i dont like them. If for some reason either party is unhappy they might have to jump through hoops to get out of it.

Turfdude
12-17-2004, 09:06 PM
I have the answer! Get them to pre-pay the whole season for mowing, then if they don't follow your care instructions for a fertilization application, just keep their money for screwing with you!!!










On a serious note, I truely believe pre-pays are more for fert programs. You may want to take deposits for mulching and definately should get a deposit(S) for landscape work.

bobbygedd
12-17-2004, 09:38 PM
I have the answer! Get them to pre-pay the whole season for mowing, then if they don't follow your care instructions for a fertilization application, just keep their money for screwing with you!!!










On a serious note, I truely believe pre-pays are more for fert programs. You may want to take deposits for mulching and definately should get a deposit(S) for landscape work.
see that turfdude, i told ya, if u pay attention, sooner or later u just may learn something from me

rodfather
12-17-2004, 09:58 PM
see that turfdude, i told ya, if u pay attention, sooner or later u just may learn something from me


robert, you never fail to amaze me and Td ALWAYS inspires me

Soupy
12-17-2004, 11:34 PM
ok, lets say you have 10 expendible lawns, meaning you keep them because they are right by an existing account, but they aren't really accounts that you count as a real customer. They are just "fill in" type of work, very small lawns, just a cut and trim, never no extras. Basically it's not even worth the time, stamp, paper, and envelope to bill them monthly, and sometimes the lawns get skipped a few weeks because they aren't a priority.

This is why there should always be a minimum price. If you charged them a minimum then these would become top priority jobs and you would be able to afford the stamp and envelope.

I make good money servicing small properties and have gotton were I don't want to do anything over 15k because the price starts to drop to much per minute. 5k is the ideal property size for mowing profits. but anything under 5k still gets charged the same.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 01:20 AM
ok, lets say you have 10 expendible lawns, meaning you keep them because they are right by an existing account, but they aren't really accounts that you count as a real customer. They are just "fill in" type of work, very small lawns, just a cut and trim, never no extras. Basically it's not even worth the time, stamp, paper, and envelope to bill them monthly, and sometimes the lawns get skipped a few weeks because they aren't a priority. So the amount is really a measly amount, but since each lawn esimated only takes like 20 some minutes a month, you keep them. My question is this.... Has anyone ever tried to sell a full season prepay mow on really really small lawns? Take the average # of cuts they got this season, and go with that number. Do you think a customer that is used to being billed monthly will go for a prepay yearly amount which would be due by March 31st???
Sometimes 'never no extras' ain't so bad.... just so long as there is enough getting done so they look good. But you have to adopt some company policies, agreements and minimum service charges. You'll read exactly what I mean as you read on.... But anyways, yeah sure, why not sell them on annual pre-pay if you can? Give me one reason you wouldn't want to? Also, other than a tight budget, why wouldn't they want to? (this is the real question) Anyways, read on...
Ive never tried it on any lawn. Im a little uncomfortable doing it. Average mows around here are 35 weeks. But what if they pay and for some reason you get 7-8 weeks of rain total. You have to dig into your pocket and reimburse at the end of the season. What if the moneys gone?

And what if for some reason you get over there and you have to double cut and bag it. How do you charge more since they already paid?
Well, there is an answer. It's called a contract/seasonal agreement. It will be a flat rate for 'X' amount of work within your 35 weeks and it will also include stipulations for certain things you need to list for your protection.
Read on...
This is why there should always be a minimum price. If you charged them a minimum then these would become top priority jobs and you would be able to afford the stamp and envelope.

I make good money servicing small properties and have gotton were I don't want to do anything over 15k because the price starts to drop to much per minute. 5k is the ideal property size for mowing profits. but anything under 5k still gets charged the same.
Now there.... Soupy has the right idea on the small stuff. Now here comes my explanation example....

First of all, for '04 I had a $30 minimum drop fee.
I also had a minimum of 32 service visits per year. (36 is typical)
So $30 x 32 = $960 yr and that is the minimum they can retain my services for.

The payment options are:
1- First week advance/retainer and $30 due each visit (Advance weekly/32 pay)
2- First month advance/retainer and $80 due 1st visit of the month (Advance 12 pay)
3- First month advance/retainer and $120 due 1st visit of the month (Advance 8 pay)
4- $960 advance yearly w/ possible discount.

These are rain or shine or drought rates for a fixed 32 week period, cut as needed or as possible due to weather, with stipulations to protect me. These are my policies, agreements and minimums, which apply to all accounts.

This is the single best thing I have done for my business.

HOOLIE
12-18-2004, 01:33 AM
Well said Envy. I firmly believe the small lawns are the most profitable. Always been that way ever since I got into this line of work. My goal for 2005 is to switch as many customers over to a flat-rate 12 month billing system as I can.

jeffex
12-18-2004, 06:12 AM
I am considering a sales plan for 2005 like that. My target is $1,000 for each customer to include mowing, 4 fert apps, and leaf maintenance[several cleanups vs one last one]. Some will include gutter cleaning and others will include areation depending on past history of need. I want a 10 month billing period of $100 a month starting with the first fert app in March. For any seasonal pre-pays I am considering a free anuals install of pansys. 3 flats will make a statement on most of my 1/4 acre residentials. My goal is to slow down and make more profit with add ons. Sell more to my same customers. They will be used to the regular $100 per month and anything extra won't hurt.

walker-talker
12-18-2004, 09:57 AM
I have it as an option on my estimates, but nobody has ever taken advantage of it. I am going to push my 5% discount this year for weed control and fertilizer program.

Those that have people prepay, do you still send them an invoice with $0 charges on them....just to let them know you made a visit?

1MajorTom
12-18-2004, 10:15 AM
This is why there should always be a minimum price. If you charged them a minimum then these would become top priority jobs and you would be able to afford the stamp and envelope.




ya well a 500 to 1000 sq ft patch of grass just won't sell for 30 bucks a cut.
kudos to you for being able to sell a 500 sq ft cut 4 times a month for $120.00. Great job, but the customer around here won't bite on that price.

richard coffman
12-18-2004, 12:30 PM
I'd stay away from pre-paying for mowing unless it's been a customers that's been hard to get payments from. I'd do it like this, for customers who have to pre-pay, have them do it weekly before you mow the lawn. I've done this and it's worked out good. In pre-payfertilizing, the only draw back is if you get a pita customer who wants free service calls to there property (I've actually have had a few of these). landscape maintenance, I ask for 50% of total job the day it's scheduled to begine and the rest 30 days after completion. I'll work with customers that want a paymet schedule, but they have to talk with me in person and bring it up before I'll do it.

Respectfully,

Richard/Owner :D :D :D :D

Soupy
12-18-2004, 01:38 PM
ya well a 500 to 1000 sq ft patch of grass just won't sell for 30 bucks a cut.
kudos to you for being able to sell a 500 sq ft cut 4 times a month for $120.00. Great job, but the customer around here won't bite on that price.

What does it cost to have someone drive to a patch of grass, unload and cut? The customers have to understand that they don't dictate the price. They either pay to have it done or do it themselves. Allthough most of my lawns are $30 and up I do have a few $25 cuts so that would make my minimum $25. $100 a month is worth a stamp and envelope.

If they are so small and you are already next door working. Why are you skipping them? Sounds like to me that they don't pay enough to make it worth your time. Why even have them as customers?

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 02:22 PM
Well said Envy. I firmly believe the small lawns are the most profitable. Always been that way ever since I got into this line of work. My goal for 2005 is to switch as many customers over to a flat-rate 12 month billing system as I can.
Thanks Hoolie. However it's paid, you have to recover a flat seasonal rate to in exchange for a slot in your schedule. End of discussion.

You can't afford not to for your wallet's sake. Plus for stress reduction, piece of mind, sanity, and protection of your enjoyment of the business. I can't deal with it and I won't. Why do it when you don't have to? I just couldn't live the business lives other people here do.

Some people are so afraid to loose a buck that they will give away all the above and their self-respect before they will gamble to better themselves. I have plenty more to say about that. But I will stop there because the truth hurts. My intention is to only to point out the truth in bits and pieces so some may see the light. Hurting feelings helps no one.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 02:35 PM
I am considering a sales plan for 2005 like that. My target is $1,000 for each customer to include mowing, 4 fert apps, and leaf maintenance[several cleanups vs one last one]. Some will include gutter cleaning and others will include areation depending on past history of need. I want a 10 month billing period of $100 a month starting with the first fert app in March. For any seasonal pre-pays I am considering a free anuals install of pansys. 3 flats will make a statement on most of my 1/4 acre residentials. My goal is to slow down and make more profit with add ons. Sell more to my same customers. They will be used to the regular $100 per month and anything extra won't hurt.
Great idea, great sales tactic, and the annuals install will benefit you as well by improving the look of the property and grabbing attention. It pays to look good out there.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 02:41 PM
ya well a 500 to 1000 sq ft patch of grass just won't sell for 30 bucks a cut.
kudos to you for being able to sell a 500 sq ft cut 4 times a month for $120.00. Great job, but the customer around here won't bite on that price.
Wow! now that is SMALL!!! Are they close enough just to zip over and get them without loading and unloading? What will the market bear? $25, $20, $15, $10 a cut? What are we talking about you doing them for now? What are you cutting them with?

Lots of variables I guess. But you have to start somewhere with minimums and no, I can't see any excuse why they wouldn't pay up front annually for the service, especially since they are exsisting customers. There only reasoning besides a tight budget would be to squeeze you out of a dollar any chance they get, which makes them even less worthwhile. See what I'm getting at?

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 02:47 PM
Those that have people prepay, do you still send them an invoice with $0 charges on them....just to let them know you made a visit?
HECK NO!!!!!!! This is part of the point. Eliminating B/S and time consuming paperwork. Work hours are work hours. This is a way of cutting back non-billed hours and increasing total per-hour profits. No paperwork, no bill continous bill or reciept generation, no stamp, no envelope, no interest free credit and waiting on your money.

Think about all the other industries that are light years ahead of us in stream lining these things. Think they went to all that trouble for nothing?

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2004, 02:49 PM
What does it cost to have someone drive to a patch of grass, unload and cut? The customers have to understand that they don't dictate the price. They either pay to have it done or do it themselves. Allthough most of my lawns are $30 and up I do have a few $25 cuts so that would make my minimum $25. $100 a month is worth a stamp and envelope.

If they are so small and you are already next door working. Why are you skipping them? Sounds like to me that they don't pay enough to make it worth your time. Why even have them as customers?

Great post that goes along with my last post to 1MajorTom....

Soupy
12-18-2004, 04:52 PM
HECK NO!!!!!!! This is part of the point. Eliminating B/S and time consuming paperwork. Work hours are work hours. This is a way of cutting back non-billed hours and increasing total per-hour profits. No paperwork, no bill continous bill or reciept generation, no stamp, no envelope, no interest free credit and waiting on your money.

Think about all the other industries that are light years ahead of us in stream lining these things. Think they went to all that trouble for nothing?

Envy, how do you collect on the monthly fees? I still send an invoice monthly but all it says is monthly maintenace fee. One thing I learned is it takes a lot more time to knock on the door and wait for someone to write out a check then it does to have everyone set up in Gopher under contracts. Then all I have to do is click generate monthly invoices and hit print. Then just wait for the money to come in.

I also like invoicing for upselling other work.

jeffex
12-18-2004, 07:32 PM
Right on Envy!! $30 bucks and 1/2 hr work may upgrade them to pay for additional seasonal color packages. I have also found that the rest of the neighbors compete with each other and may want in on the action. Spreading the payment over 10 months helps keep sticker shock down. I'm not giving them a discount I would actually be raising thier total fee for the average season. It would just be spread out so they will get comfortable with it. Controlling the nitrogen in the fert apps will keep mowing under control. Some have chemlawn and they blast away with the N because they don't have to worry about how many cuts a month are needed. I am not preying on my customers I am just trying to control how much time is spent collecting and BSing about price and scheduling. When I am there I can do the work at a more relaxed pace with a higher profit margin. Face time with my customers will just be friendly conversation vs sales pitch.

Envy Lawn Service
12-19-2004, 01:49 AM
Envy, how do you collect on the monthly fees? I still send an invoice monthly but all it says is monthly maintenace fee. One thing I learned is it takes a lot more time to knock on the door and wait for someone to write out a check then it does to have everyone set up in Gopher under contracts. Then all I have to do is click generate monthly invoices and hit print. Then just wait for the money to come in.

I also like invoicing for upselling other work.

Monthly fees? OK, first keep in mind I'm a solo operator, so things are not as complicated for me as a big numbers company. But here's how I work it. At signing I collect the 1st month in advance, like a retainer sorta. This is the start. Notice what I'm trying to do is create good paying habits rather than trying to break them from bad paying habits later on. Anyways, I explain the whole thing of how my policies work and we iron out the fine details of what is expected of BOTH of us.

From there on out, depending on how we are set up with each other, the payments are continuously in advance for each month. Collection options are convenient for both of us. Examples are advanced billing if they want me to mail or drop off an invoice. They get what they want and they still get it in time to pay me in advance for the month, which is what I want.

As far as the physical collection goes, again, what is convenient for both of us. If they want or need to mail it they get what they want, and payment arrives in the mail by the due date in advance for the month, which is what I want. Some leave me a check, some leave a check with employees, some have me sign for payout and some meet me outside for personal delivery, just whatever they want. The main thing is the payment is in advance and I do not chase money.

The thing many fail to realize is, advance payment is not so much about "gimmie my money up front so I don't get stiffed on payment" as it is about creating good payment habits and getting both parties on the same page with a mutual understanding as well as mutual respect.

My signature line else where says the following:

First of all you've got to ask yourself....
Are you a Lawn Service or a Loan Service?

And that pretty much sums it up in a nutshell.... I'm not in the business of making loans or collecting debts. Those careers come with a nice 6 figure salary, benefits package, and pension plan. You hop in the BMW, arrive at your nice air conditioned office at 9am, where you sit comfortably all day in your business suit until 5pm, at which time you hop back in the BMW, go home to relax and watch someone else mow your lawn.

So.... why the hell would I want to do that for free after working my azz off in the hot sun all day?

B&B Lndscpng & Lwn Srvc
12-19-2004, 02:09 AM
I would agree with alot of the other guys and say their are too many variables if you accept payment up front for the full year. I have alot of those type yards mainly renter houses with currently no rentors that the owner says mow when needed. I would rather stick with the monthly. But hey i'm new here so who cares anyway!!

Envy Lawn Service
12-19-2004, 02:13 AM
Right on Envy!! $30 bucks and 1/2 hr work may upgrade them to pay for additional seasonal color packages. I have also found that the rest of the neighbors compete with each other and may want in on the action.

I am not preying on my customers I am just trying to control how much time is spent collecting and BSing about price and scheduling. When I am there I can do the work at a more relaxed pace with a higher profit margin. Face time with my customers will just be friendly conversation vs sales pitch.
That's right... exactly what I was getting at. Offering a free service that makes you look good in leu of a discount is a win-win situation. The customer gets a break and gets somethiing nice, while you on the other hand have converted a % decrease in income into a sound investment.

Boy, the second part hits the nail right on the head!!! Cutting back on headaches and non-profit personal working hours.... And putting those hours to more productive use, such as a more relaxing pace with higher profit margin, upselling, or building more personal business relationships.

Not to pick on anyone, but one guy says it's a lot less time consuming to drop a bill in the mail and wait on payment. I on the other hand argue it's more enjoyable and profitable to have a customer come out to greet me with a check for next months service if they so choose. I feel my time is better invested in brief personal interaction with the customer on a regular basis and the communication is a heck of a lot more positive than recieving a bill in the mail or the dreaded collection call from me.

Soupy
12-19-2004, 02:57 AM
Monthly fees? OK, first keep in mind I'm a solo operator, so things are not as complicated for me as a big numbers company. But here's how I work it. At signing I collect the 1st month in advance, like a retainer sorta. This is the start. Notice what I'm trying to do is create good paying habits rather than trying to break them from bad paying habits later on. Anyways, I explain the whole thing of how my policies work and we iron out the fine details of what is expected of BOTH of us.

From there on out, depending on how we are set up with each other, the payments are continuously in advance for each month. Collection options are convenient for both of us. Examples are advanced billing if they want me to mail or drop off an invoice. They get what they want and they still get it in time to pay me in advance for the month, which is what I want.

As far as the physical collection goes, again, what is convenient for both of us. If they want or need to mail it they get what they want, and payment arrives in the mail by the due date in advance for the month, which is what I want. Some leave me a check, some leave a check with employees, some have me sign for payout and some meet me outside for personal delivery, just whatever they want. The main thing is the payment is in advance and I do not chase money.

The thing many fail to realize is, advance payment is not so much about "gimmie my money up front so I don't get stiffed on payment" as it is about creating good payment habits and getting both parties on the same page with a mutual understanding as well as mutual respect.

My signature line else where says the following:

First of all you've got to ask yourself....
Are you a Lawn Service or a Loan Service?

And that pretty much sums it up in a nutshell.... I'm not in the business of making loans or collecting debts. Those careers come with a nice 6 figure salary, benefits package, and pension plan. You hop in the BMW, arrive at your nice air conditioned office at 9am, where you sit comfortably all day in your business suit until 5pm, at which time you hop back in the BMW, go home to relax and watch someone else mow your lawn.

So.... why the hell would I want to do that for free after working my azz off in the hot sun all day?

I see, I was just curious if you used payment books or something similer if you didn't invoice them. You mentioned that no billing was required and that is what triggered my question.

Soupy
12-19-2004, 03:09 AM
Not to pick on anyone, but one guy says it's a lot less time consuming to drop a bill in the mail and wait on payment. I on the other hand argue it's more enjoyable and profitable to have a customer come out to greet me with a check for next months service if they so choose. I feel my time is better invested in brief personal interaction with the customer on a regular basis and the communication is a heck of a lot more positive than recieving a bill in the mail or the dreaded collection call from me.

I know you are not picking on anyone :) I don't have a problem letting a customer walk out and hand me a check, or even to come out to say hi. My time comparison was really compared to the old days of knocking on the door after each cut and waiting for the customer to write a check (why they don't have it ready?). 15 lawns a day times 5 minutes getting paid adds up to a much longer day. I guess it's not so bad just doing it once a month. I do take the time to communicate with customers and have good relations. But there are alot of customers that just like to have their lawn taken care of and never want to be bothered. Some of my best customers I have never met. I invoice them and if I feel they need something done it is included on the invoice as an upsell. I always add a box and description of service along with cost on the payment stub. They just check that box when they send in payment and the work gets done.

I guess it comes down to what you said. "Whatever works for both of us". If a customer wants to be personable, I give them that (and the old ladies think I'm adorable :) ). If a customer just wants lawn care and doesn't care who you are personally, then I give them that too.

jeffex
12-19-2004, 08:59 AM
Great observation Envy, I'm glad to hear that situation exists in NC. I want to retire in the Charlotte NC area. Md is too expensive for retirement. I can sell my house here and buy one for cash and cut lawns for fun money!
I have some of my customer tape a check to the inside of their storm door. I call it my "pay at your front door " program. Like you, I discuss payment and service options up front. I don't like waiting to get paid although some monthlies are necessary. My goal is to move all aspects of the relationship to fit my goals while providing high end quality.

GrassBustersLawn
12-19-2004, 09:48 AM
Personally, I don't get the "5% or 10% DISCOUNT" for pre-paying! That is 5 or 10% straight off your BOTTOM LINE! Your expenses aren't reduced 10% because they pre-pay!

If you can't come up with enough reasons for them to pay in advance...(You are retaining a spot on my schedule...I'm out there working in your yard when it is COLD, HOT, WINDY and you are resting comfortably in your house, etc.) It is called SALES! You need to SELL THEM YOUR PROGRAM! IF they don't want it, move on to someone that does!!!!!

Mike

Fareway Lawncare
12-19-2004, 09:55 AM
If you don't Want to bill them Monthly...Just Bill them Once...At the End of the Season.