PDA

View Full Version : Rubber Ground Cover


elijahjames
12-22-2004, 02:43 AM
Has anyone used groundcover that simulates bark but is made out of recycled tires? I saw the guys display at a landscape show. It comes in a variety of colors and he claims will retain the color for 7 years as well as ADA approved.

Lawnchoice
12-22-2004, 03:05 AM
Seems funny to me at first !

Do you remember the name of the company?

bblawncareprofessionals
12-22-2004, 03:56 AM
http://rubberific.com/

That's a company with a patent on the process...don't know if it's the one he saw at the show. Looks something like a cedar bark, choose your colors.

YardPro
12-22-2004, 07:04 AM
problem with it is that it is purely cosmetic.
it adds no biomass to the soil, does not retain moisture, or do any of the things mulch is supposed to do.

Lawnchoice
12-22-2004, 07:20 AM
Cosmetic is the key word.

Playgrounds would greatly benefit from it. The only issue is, you have a one shot deal every 6 +/- years. Not a huge revenue generator.

landstroker51
12-22-2004, 07:25 AM
I would guess that when humidity and temperatures rise, that the smell does too??

YardPro
12-22-2004, 07:51 AM
lowe's carried it a while back. they didn't sell much as it was VERY expensive.

bblawncareprofessionals
12-22-2004, 07:52 AM
Read through the whole website...you guys are absolutely right. They only 'push' it as cosmetic improvement or for safety. They're big on the "won't attract bugs like mulch", and "safe for playgrounds". I guess if you have one of those green pebble lawns that "looks like grass", this product may work for them. Those severe xeriscape customers ought to put pictures of blue skies and green lawns in their windows so they don't have to look at REAL nature.

GroundKprs
12-22-2004, 10:28 AM
Crumb rubber mulch has been around for over 20 years. Every few years someone gets active on marketing it. From a functional landscape approach, it is a disaster. The benefit of longevity is the main problem. What gets disturbed from the beds will remain in the lawn for years, LOL.

Also, you cannot clean debris - leaves, twigs, shrubbery trimmings - from it without removing a significant amount of the crumb rubber. It may be a safe surface in a play area. I had a day care nursery years ago that put it under the swing set. The only way they could get the leaves and twigs out of it was to have the children pick them out by hand!!

The tire recyclers would better spend their time promoting more crumb rubber use in road resurfacing, as it is also used there, mixing in asphalt. But there are a lot of suckers out in the landscape business.

Mowingman
12-22-2004, 10:58 AM
There is a retail strip center here that tried it a few years ago. It lasts a long time. But, it looks just as bad now as it did when it went in. Looks like colored, shredded tires. Some of the wire from the radial tires shows on a lot of the pieces. The color has weathered off a lot, and much of it is now back to basic black.

out4now
12-22-2004, 11:51 AM
What they said ^

elijahjames
12-22-2004, 01:21 PM
As usual good advice and comments from all. This is what makes this site invaluable.

Guthrie&Co
12-23-2004, 01:45 AM
i wouldnt even worry about it not having soil admendments. i would worry about the arsnic(sp) and other hazardous chemicals in it.

Groundcover Solutions
12-23-2004, 03:45 AM
Extremly expensive, the only good application would be on a small residential playground. You would then need a good barior around the playground so you do not lose any into the grass. If you get excessive spill of the black material I would assume that the heat form the sun would heat it up and just cook the grass. But the price of the stuff is astrinomical and is not justified on larger applications. No matter what material you use on a playground in a large scale, it will get kicked and moved out from under slides, swings, and any other equipment. Then you need to replace it and fill in the holes which in tern gets extremly expinsive with this material. Just dose not add up when you look at the numbers.

YardPro
01-23-2005, 09:11 AM
i wouldnt even worry about it not having soil admendments. i would worry about the arsnic(sp) and other hazardous chemicals in it.

that's a knee jerk comment.
the only way for it to be released is if the stuff cought on fire.

if you're truely worried about carcinogens in this type of product,
don't walk on any asphaly road or driveway, don't tough any shingles, don't pick up a newspaper, cuase it has been thrown in the asphalt driveway, and is contaminated.......... and the list goes on...

B&B Lndscpng & Lwn Srvc
01-23-2005, 11:33 AM
Not that any local authorities will enforce it but it's still rubber and most cities and counties have laws against rubber tires laying around.

Markf
01-23-2005, 12:07 PM
I looked into this idea in depth because I needed 310 yards of mulch for my own property. I stayed away from it because I was told by a number of insiders that on a hot summer day the smell of tires could permeate the neighborhood. There is also the problem as stated prior of the debris removal and no moisture retention. I stuck with the organic mulch. Did the job by hand. (Family is free labor!) Next time I will look into mulch blowing.

Guthrie&Co
01-24-2005, 04:14 PM
that's a knee jerk comment.
the only way for it to be released is if the stuff cought on fire.

if you're truely worried about carcinogens in this type of product,
don't walk on any asphaly road or driveway, don't tough any shingles, don't pick up a newspaper, cuase it has been thrown in the asphalt driveway, and is contaminated.......... and the list goes on...
yeah you right. most of the time that rubber mulch is used its on a playground anyway. and as we all know kids wouldnt put that in their mouths, throw it at each other. by the way it also has lead in it. do you research you will be surprised what you will find.

YardPro
01-24-2005, 08:06 PM
Not that any local authorities will enforce it but it's still rubber and most cities and counties have laws against rubber tires laying around.

that's becuase of the water that is held in the sides..... mosquitos... encephalitis, etc...

YardPro
01-24-2005, 08:09 PM
yeah you right. most of the time that rubber mulch is used its on a playground anyway. and as we all know kids wouldnt put that in their mouths, throw it at each other. by the way it also has lead in it. do you research you will be surprised what you will find.


true, i would not want my kid eating it,
but that is mainly becuase of the wires in it etc.

the add that i saw stated that it was "playground certified" and listed as a cushoning mulch approved by the NC dep of health.

hosejockey2002
01-29-2005, 03:08 PM
that's a knee jerk comment.
the only way for it to be released is if the stuff cought on fire.

The stuff probably will catch on fire at one point. The road department in a county down by the ocean from here used recycled tires mixed in with asphalt to resurface the roads. They had to tear it all out because the mixture would spontaneously combust and the roads would literally be smoldering. Mulch is a different application, but when some knucklehead drops a cigarette into this stuff and it gets going, it will be a nasty, smoky mess.

YardPro
01-30-2005, 06:10 PM
yes i am sure it will burn, but it is much harder to get started thansome other mulches.. pine straw is a prime example.

but i bet the tires would be a lot harder to extinguish... and stinky... phew

Guthrie&Co
01-30-2005, 11:47 PM
not to mention the fumes coming out of all that crap.

idugaholez
02-01-2005, 02:42 PM
I happen to sell Rubberific Mulch in Wisconsin, so I may be biased, but rubber mulch is the ticket. While its true that it does not bio degrade into the soil(its biggest downfall), it is more that just "cosmetic".

Rubberific Mulch uses a dye, that lasts up to 10 years, sp there is no need to replace it every year, and it always looks fresh. As far as moisture goes, it lets the moisture into the soil, and traps it there, keeping the soil moist. regular mulch retains the moisture in the mulch, not letting it get to the soil, and wood mulch also has molds and fungus.

I have it at my house, and a property that I take care of, and as far as keeping the beds clean, if your careful, you can take a blower to it, and blow the debris off with no problem.

I love the mulch, I think it is a great way to get rid of tires, keeps your yard looking great. I just wish I would have thought of it in the first place.

If you have any questions, you can email me @ idugahole@athenet.net.


Doug

Guthrie&Co
02-03-2005, 02:38 PM
what about root rot if it holds the moisture in?

Garth
02-03-2005, 04:22 PM
Extremly expensive, the only good application would be on a small residential playground. You would then need a good barior around the playground so you do not lose any into the grass. If you get excessive spill of the black material I would assume that the heat form the sun would heat it up and just cook the grass. But the price of the stuff is astrinomical and is not justified on larger applications. No matter what material you use on a playground in a large scale, it will get kicked and moved out from under slides, swings, and any other equipment. Then you need to replace it and fill in the holes which in tern gets extremly expinsive with this material. Just dose not add up when you look at the numbers.
This stuff on playgrounds scares me with all the nasty little needle-sharp wires protruding from it. Besides the risk of injury who'd want their kid coming home smelling like the Michellin man?

Groundcover Solutions
02-03-2005, 10:44 PM
all the peices in the playground that i saw did not have any wire in them. I am sure they have a proccess of removing the wire thus making it safe.

idugaholez
02-04-2005, 12:05 PM
By holding the moisture in, i dont mean forever. Its not gong to be to the extreme of root rot. As far as how safe it can be for a playgorund???
The Governement rated it the best and safest stuff on the market for playgrounds. There are 3 different products out there, the least expenseive of them has 99%of the metal removed in the chpping process. And after that, they use a 2000lb. magnet to remove any other metal.

The color is non-toxic, I know, hard for some of you to believe, so its not harmful to your children. The rubber itself is probably not the best to eat, but neither is stone, sticks, and dirt/sand.

Now, as far as there being lead in there, like sombody else wrote, NOT True!!


Doug
Rubberific Mulch of Northeast WI, LLC

YardPro
02-06-2005, 04:44 PM
i think the lack of knowledge on something just sacres people.

there is one unarguable point. IT DOES NOT BREAK DOWN.
mulches are used not only for water retention, but also for decomposition. this adds amendments to the soil.
tires don't do this.

but i agree with it being safe. uncle sam is very strict what he approves for platground use.