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Gatewayuser
01-01-2005, 07:18 PM
I will be getting my pesticide applicators license in late Feb. and I need to know do I need a Liquid sprayer and, or can I just use a broadcast spreader. I will be getting my fertilizer from Lesco. So if I apply say 18-5-12 dry urethra how much should I charge if I have a 12ft spread walk behind spreader applied per acre. Also how much should I charge to apply broad-leaf per acre. :waving: Any help would be very helpful ! !
' U

Runner
01-02-2005, 05:24 PM
Please don't take this the wrong way, as I mean no harm or offense by it. But, The questions that are being asked on here recently are nothing short of completely ASTONISHING to me. In the first place, if you go into Lesco and ask for dried "Urethra", I'm willing to bet,..they're going to look at you a little funny.
But seriously, if a license is being issued in February, and questions like this are being asked, what sort of testing and criteria are required for some of these states. Is Ohio one of those states that you can just go down, take a test (that you studied for in the truck while you were driving down - [as someone else had once stated]), and bam, they say "Here's your license, now just go out and blast properties with unfamiliar pesticides and methods." Or, do they have a higher criteria requiring work experience and/or college education.
To actually help you, the best advice I could give is get on here and read, read, read. Do some searches and explore. Good luck with it, and again...don't be offended. I am just stating that I am suprised at some of the "minimum" amount of experience that is going into this future of pesticidw application. I hate to say it,..but I see the same thing happening to this aspect of the green industry as what happened to the mowing over the last 15 years.

Dman1214
01-02-2005, 05:46 PM
If you're concerned about dry urethra prices you should see your urologist!
Get a grip!!!

KLR
01-02-2005, 08:36 PM
If you're concerned about dry urethra prices you should see your urologist!
Get a grip!!!
Dman...witty as ever!
:)
Ken

ForeverGreen
01-02-2005, 09:04 PM
Runner, hate to admit it but here in Ohio it is just that simple, received mine in 1978 and have added categories and kept up with credit hours every since. Seems that if your willing to shell out the cash for the license and let the state hold your certificate of insurance and you have a business license that you are good to go.You then can let others operate (to a debatable degree) under your license.I see what other states make a operator go through to get into the bizz and wish it were that way here in Oh.The tests have very little to do with practical application. Most go take the test once to see what to study for and take a very similar test again if not passing the first one. (often the next day)I believe you get 3 tries before you have to wait for 6 months or so.When I hired custom applicators in the ag business it was my policy that if you could not pass the test and hold your own license that you weren't experienced enough to apply on my customers properties let alone under my license.Most Nationals have but one licensed applicator per outlet as far as I know in Ohio (sad)

E-9 Lawncare
01-02-2005, 09:15 PM
It's pretty simple in PA too. You take the Core test, which is 50 bucks and closed book, and the Cat. 7 , $10 open book, and you're good to go. You keep up with the credits and that's it.

James Cormier
01-03-2005, 10:42 AM
It's pretty simple in PA too. You take the Core test, which is 50 bucks and closed book, and the Cat. 7 , $10 open book, and you're good to go. You keep up with the credits and that's it.

E, you dont need proof of insurance to hold that license? Here in MA you do, and what that does is require someone to have a financial commitment, and thats something the fly by nighters or scrubs or what ever you call them dont do. So thats what really makes the license important, I understand its easy, and cheap to take the test, but the insurance is not cheap.

James Cormier
01-03-2005, 12:15 PM
Dman...witty as ever!
:)


Hey KLR, havent seen you around in a while. Hope all is well

Jim

Gatewayuser
01-03-2005, 12:44 PM
I meant urea sorry! :rolleyes: I went and took turf grass management and a pesticide applicator course so I can offer great care and service. There is a lot more to the test now then there use to be. I got my stack of stuff to study from the state and there is 3 good size books and 3 smaller books. Also in this state you have to be insured to have an applicators biz license. Can someone please give me some prices. :)

James Cormier
01-03-2005, 01:06 PM
Can someone please give me some prices. :)

Why dont you try this, Take some time, do a budget, find out what your costs will be for the season, figure out how much you wanna make and what you should charge. Once you do that come back and post what your prices are and we will tell you what we think of it.

Gatewayuser
01-03-2005, 01:50 PM
Sounds good to me thanks! :waving:

Gatewayuser
01-03-2005, 02:43 PM
Ok see if this price is about right $450 a year per acre for pre-emergent and fertilizer early spring, post emergent and higher nitrogen fertilizer late spring, very slow release fertilizer in summer, than a high phosphate low nitrogen in early fall than again in late fall. All dry applications.

ForeverGreen
01-03-2005, 02:48 PM
Gateway, I hope the courses help and ODA is getting up to speed. I added 3A Aquatic Pest to mine 3 years ago and retook 8 Turf Pest and Core for the fun of it (glitch on ODA's part) and did not find it much of a test, perhaps doing this too long.I found more trick answers where one answer was a bit more correct than another but at least two were correct out of four. If you think "green" on the test you will be fine but dont think the first right answer is always the one they are lookng for. Good Luck Ted PS James, have you taken off the plow for the year since spring is just around the corner?? Better get those dual tanks ready !! :)

ForeverGreen
01-03-2005, 03:11 PM
Gateway,Figure at least $4.00 to $5.50 per 1m sq, small lawn with a minimum charge and figure acres get a break. A standard formula for acres will not work .Like James said work up a business plan so you know your cost of doing business (your breakeven point)What do you want to make, what do you need to make etc. Dont start out cheap thinking you will increase it later, start out at a decent rate to start with.Try to figure out why anyone will do business with "you" and push that as your strong point (s). This can take a few years.If your strongpoint is price it is over before you start.The nationals will bury you.You should have a Lesco type dealer in your area that can guide you on "STEPS" for a programmed approach.Some accounts want 4lb n per 1m sq per year some dont, figure out what lawns need a ph reduction or addition and or a fe application and set yourself apart from the ones that dont do this."Niche" is good, especially if you plan on mowing also. You may find that you will not have time to mow somewhere around 300-350 accounts on a full program.Good luck

Gatewayuser
01-03-2005, 03:46 PM
Also I will being using I.P.M. and taking soil samples to send to a lab before I applicate on someones property so I know what the lawn needs and what it does'nt need. Thats the price I came up with, is it even close to being right?
Thanks for all the help ForeverGreen! :waving:

James Cormier
01-03-2005, 03:52 PM
Ok see if this price is about right $450 a year per acre for pre-emergent and fertilizer early spring, post emergent and higher nitrogen fertilizer late spring, very slow release fertilizer in summer, than a high phosphate low nitrogen in early fall than again in late fall. All dry applications.

Its time to get back to that budget.

You got 5 treatments listed $450.00 per year on 34,000 sq ft lawn is only $90.00 per app. What if the lawn is 20,000sqft? or 12,000sqft?

Keep working at it, remember when doing that budget, include all expenses

James Cormier
01-03-2005, 03:55 PM
James, have you taken off the plow for the year since spring is just around the corner?? Better get those dual tanks ready !! :)

I havent even been in the office yet this winter let alone the shop :D

We get a few inches of snow, then it melts and then a few days with temps in the 50's I havent put the bike away yet. Went riding today :cool:

toxic man
01-03-2005, 06:22 PM
The cost for Insurance on a start-up Company in California is 1400.00 per year. That is for gl and application insurance. Companies with higher receipts are much higher.

And, nice bike Jim, that's what I am already liking about this industry, winters off.

Lou
Weed Solutions

philk17088
01-04-2005, 09:40 AM
E, you dont need proof of insurance to hold that license? Here in MA you do, and what that does is require someone to have a financial commitment, and thats something the fly by nighters or scrubs or what ever you call them dont do. So thats what really makes the license important, I understand its easy, and cheap to take the test, but the insurance is not cheap.

In PA you have to hold a business liscense which requires a certain threshold of insurance. Now what e9 said refers to the applicator himself. To be commercial you have an applicators liscense and be under the business liscense. There also is a registered tech catergory for new hires to work with a certified applicator until they take the test.
In my opinion it is still too easy for somebody to get a liscense in PA.

The other thing is that you only need a liscense to buy R.U material, you can buy as much pesticide as you want without a liscense and then take the chance of not getting caught when you apply it for money.
If the states would reguire a liscense for every purchase of a material with an EPA number the scrubs would wither up and fade away.

James Cormier
01-04-2005, 09:54 AM
If the states would reguire a liscense for every purchase of a material with an EPA number the scrubs would wither up and fade away.

Phil, This is a huge point, and I try to make it every time I talk with some at the state level.

Ive always suggested having a inspector sit across the street from a lesco service center, and pull people over coming out. Lesco knowingly sell to unlicensed landscapers, and not small quantities either, we are talking pallets here.

Now if there customers started getting harassed by the state, then I think companies like lesco would stop selling it, and maybe work harder to get local companies in there area to go legit.

garydale
01-04-2005, 07:01 PM
James Cormier has the right idea on how to proceed.

Sounds like some basic business training would really help. ie: bubgeting/ planning.

Please stop using "Chemicals" or even "Pesticides" because they give the wrong message in this enviromentally friendly world. I like "Control Products" as a good term to use.By learning to say control vs. kill,poison,etc. you and the industry will benefit.

You need to know your costs to do pricing not other companies.

Hope these things help.

garydale

ForeverGreen
01-04-2005, 07:10 PM
You are correct on the "chemical" part The Ag Industry switched to "crop protection products" many years ago vs "chemicals" I have used "Turf Protection Products" in my advertising since started in turf bizz.No weed or insect "killers" here. Fertilizer is also a "nutrient" Good post, Ted