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DiscoveryLawn
01-04-2005, 12:50 AM
I did a search and got some good info but I would like to ask this of fertilizing and weed control companies only.

I am considering hiring a sales representative (selling application programs only) to work on a commission only basis. I know of a local company that pays his sales staff a salary plus 5% commission of annual sales. I am considering paying a straight commission of 10% of annual sales. I am still playing with the numbers though. The rep. will generate his own leads via door to door sales and few other ideas I have. Leads that are generated by my efforts (advertising, referrals etc.) will pay a commission of 5%.

I am going to check with my CPA but I am also considering making this person an independent contractor.

I would like to know some of your thoughts regarding pros and cons of paying a sales rep commission only vs. salary + com.

Also does anyone do something different to compensate sales person or other employees for new sales?

Thank you for your help,

David

i_plant_art
01-04-2005, 01:10 AM
its a tricky thing i think something to worry about as far as an independent contractor go are insurance requirments, for vehicle and such what if somethign were to happen its a question of if they were "working" when it happened or not (does this makes sense) also are they always selling for you or maybe they have a company as well and are selling other things as well such as mowing etc etc for themselves as an actual employee it would be easier to get them to sign a no compete with you. also a question i have is are you going to have a company vehicle for them or do they have to have thier own. if they have thier own you have an insurance liability there as mentioned b4 but also milage ( which could be nasty if not properly accounted for) just somethings to keep in mind. currently i do all of my own selling but have thought about looking into a sales person like you are. keep us up to date on if u decide to do it or not and which way u choose to make things happen

DiscoveryLawn
01-04-2005, 01:23 AM
If I go the indepedent route they will use there own vehicle, insurance and pay for their own gas. As far as they selling other work for themselves I don't care what they do if they are 100% commission and are turning in sales. I no longer mow or landscape so as long as they are not selling apps. for themselves they are welcome to pick up extra work as long as they are clear that it is not my company that is doing the other work.

If I go the salaried + comm. employee route or even 100% comm. employee route than I would reimburse for mileage and I will not permit selling of any services other than my own on the companies time. I do have an extra truck that I could use as a sales vehicle but I would rather keep that available for future growth.

David

Dman1214
01-04-2005, 03:08 AM
Independent rep theory would be out - no way would that pass an IRS audit in my opinion. As far as how you would compensate, you must consider net sales -how would you back out cancels? I pay my sales reps salary plus commission - I want them working for me. I start with 4-5 full-time sales guys and reduce as the season progresses (1 usually weeds himself out, 2 role into service, and 2 remain in sales - new sales and alot of upsells to existing cust.)

DiscoveryLawn
01-04-2005, 08:15 AM
Thanks DMAN
Before the independent rep theory gets thrown out too fast I want to mention that there are both local and national home improvement, steak and seafood sales and delivery services, knife sales (Cutco) and several other companies that pay their reps this way. Not only are the reps independent but in many cases the canvassers that go around knocking on doors to set appointments for the reps are independent as well.

Anyway I am going to check with my CPA on this one to know for certain. I am just curious to know if any of you guys can offer an opinion outside of the potential IRS implications.

David

philk17088
01-04-2005, 09:30 AM
Thanks DMAN
Before the independent rep theory gets thrown out too fast I want to mention that there are both local and national home improvement, steak and seafood sales and delivery services, knife sales (Cutco) and several other companies that pay their reps this way. Not only are the reps independent but in many cases the canvassers that go around knocking on doors to set appointments for the reps are independent as well.

Anyway I am going to check with my CPA on this one to know for certain. I am just curious to know if any of you guys can offer an opinion outside of the potential IRS implications.

David

I think this has another angle to it. Do you want your company to be viewed in the same light as these window sellers?

I would really be wary of the commission only route.This puts alot of pressure on a rep to make any money.He might start over promising or selling what ever he possibly can to make a buck.

Another thing to consider when setting this up is your perception of what a rep is. Just from your thinking it seems like you hold sales reps in low regard, a necessary evil. THis perception will shine right thru to a real sales pro and he will drop you like a hot potatoe.
This is a position that will have a direct impact on your business.The rep will be the first thing that the customer gets to know about your company. Do you really want an independent contractor setting the tone for your customer relationships?
Just something more to think about.

James Cormier
01-04-2005, 09:46 AM
Thanks DMAN
Before the independent rep theory gets thrown out too fast I want to mention that there are both local and national home improvement, steak and seafood sales and delivery services, knife sales (Cutco) and several other companies that pay their reps this way. Not only are the reps independent but in many cases the canvassers that go around knocking on doors to set appointments for the reps are independent as well.

Anyway I am going to check with my CPA on this one to know for certain. I am just curious to know if any of you guys can offer an opinion outside of the potential IRS implications.

David

The sub contract route may work out, I think its worth talking about. There are some new rules that the IRS has set forth and are pretty strict about qualifying someone as a sub contractor.

The most important is setting hours, if you require them to come into the office each day, punch in, then punch out each day at the same time then they dont qualify as a sub. Now that doesn't mean you cant do it that way and many do. The problem comes if you ever get audited, then your will owe. Also one of the most important is use own vehicle.

Of course subs carry there own insurance, vehicle's and pay own expenses. Your liability is reduced, but your control is also reduced as far as productivity. You must stay on top of this, cause Ive been burned by subs not carrying insurance, and when my insurance audit came I paid dearly.

Now the bigger question is, are there salepeople out there that want to work this way? Do you need salespeople that have turf backgrounds? Dman, you could answer that one right? What kind of support do you the owner have to give a sub salesperson, Direct mail, newspaper ads, tv, radio. Or just send them out there?

Good subject to toss around

AintNoFun
01-04-2005, 10:15 AM
just out of curiosity, what would you pay someone a week if you were giving them a 5% commission on top of a salary?

DiscoveryLawn
01-04-2005, 02:04 PM
just out of curiosity, what would you pay someone a week if you were giving them a 5% commission on top of a salary?

I was thinking of $300.00 per week. However, I really have not done much research in that direction YET so that is just an educated guess.

David

comperk
01-04-2005, 05:20 PM
The number one way to build your company is to hire the right people. You get what you pay for. I would definitely go for salary plus commission. Look at the big picture...

1) They will want income stability over the course of the year. Winter and the dead of Summer will produce the least amount of sales. However, you make up for that with the Spring rush and early Summer. It will even out over the course of the year.
2) The first several years will probably not be profitable. However, the customers that the salesperson produces in the first two years will still be around in the third year (if your service is good), etc. Does that make sense?
3) We pay on a straight commission, not a percentage, depending on the number of applications and extra services. $5, $10, $15, $20, and $25 plus $450-$500 per week.
4) Give them a yearly goal...400 to 450 customers. This is reasonable in a decent market.
5) What kind of company do you have? Do you sell on price or value? If you sell on price, you will make more sales, but you will have less profit and your customers will not stay with you. If you sell value, you will sell less customers, however, they will stay with you and in the long run they will make you more money.

These are some things to think about. I hope it helps.

James Cormier
01-04-2005, 06:40 PM
?
3) We pay on a straight commission, not a percentage, depending on the number of applications and extra services. $5, $10, $15, $20, and $25 plus $450-$500 per week.
.

Could you explain this a little clearer.
Thanks
JIm

comperk
01-04-2005, 07:09 PM
Jim,

We pay a higher rate for a higher number of applications and extra services. Example: 5 applications = $10 5 applications + core aeration = $15 5 applications + core aeration + grub control = $20. On top of that, we pay $450 to $500 per week in salary.

If a guy makes 10 sales per week @ an average of $12.50. He makes an extra $125. This will vary greatly on the season.

We have been toying with the idea of a percentage but in our system it creates more problems than solutions.

Does that help?

comperk
01-04-2005, 07:10 PM
I see now where it was confusing my fault. I meant flat "rate". Sorry.

Dman1214
01-04-2005, 07:14 PM
what system do you use? How are you getting your sales reps? When do you start your sales season? How many reps do you run in the spring?
Thank you in advance. DMAN 1214

comperk
01-04-2005, 07:25 PM
Well, I didn't tell you the whole story. Our technicians do all of our selling. They are full time year around. Right now I have 20 guys that are full time salespeople. Their sales season started when the production season was done and it will end when the production season starts. We ask a lot of our technicians and they handle all of the spring rush too. We hire when we don't have to so that we get only the best employees. During production they handle all of the call ins and any other leads that occur from marketing. Don't be fooled, they are real honest to goodness salespeople in the Winter. We train hard and do weekly evaluations. Our techs make more money in the winter than during production season.

James Cormier
01-04-2005, 09:10 PM
Well, I didn't tell you the whole story. Our technicians do all of our selling. They are full time year around. Right now I have 20 guys that are full time salespeople. Their sales season started when the production season was done and it will end when the production season starts. We ask a lot of our technicians and they handle all of the spring rush too. We hire when we don't have to so that we get only the best employees. During production they handle all of the call ins and any other leads that occur from marketing. Don't be fooled, they are real honest to goodness salespeople in the Winter. We train hard and do weekly evaluations. Our techs make more money in the winter than during production season.

Perky ( so named by dman ) Sounds like you got a good plan in place, sounds alot like when I worked for Old Fox back in the mid 80's We had several commercial salesman, but us techs did all the residential sales as well as the production. Made for long hours in spring, and we where paid well but it took alot out of some people who were great tech's but not good salesman.

MacLawnCo
01-09-2005, 04:00 PM
David, i thnk you are going about this backwards. It seems you are hiring a salesman so that you will be able to stay behind your spreader... If that is the case, then that just isnt wise. I could have the wrong impression though.

DiscoveryLawn
01-10-2005, 01:10 PM
Maclawn, I do not have enough clients to justify hiring a full time tech. What I want to do is continue doing the apps myself until I have enough business to justify taking myself out of the field full time. I really do not think I can do this until I have at least two full routes of applications. At that time I will dedicate more of my time toward sales and the management of the company.

I believe hiring a salesman at this time is justifiable because the salesman's pay is self generating. The more he sells, the more he makes, the more revenue generated for the company. If he does not sell, I don't owe him anything (and of course he will move on).

Hiring a tech will certainly free me up to concentrate on sales full time but I will have increased my labor beyond the companies means to support it. I will have that techs salary to cover whether the sales come in or not.

The only way I can hire a tech and sell full time is if I were certain I could sell enough accounts to reach two full routes this season. My ego wants to say I can do it but realistically, I think its a long shot. So I'll er on the side of caution on this one.

I will say this though, back when I was mowing I hurt my back and was forced to step off of the mower for several months. At the time I only had $75,000.00 in revenue and was doing it solo (with the exception of a helper in the spring). I used that time to network and sell. The following year I grossed $175,000.00 and did very little mowing myself and continued to spend most of my time selling. The year after that I grossed $300,000.00 and did not touch a mower. I did, however, through out that time continue to do all of my applications with the exception of two rounds I had tech do them. Perhaps I should spend more time evaluating the possibility of taking the same approach with my applications business.

By the way, I only do lawn applications now. I no longer mow or landscape.

David

James Cormier
01-10-2005, 01:54 PM
Maclawn, I do not have enough clients to justify hiring a full time tech. What I want to do is continue doing the apps myself until I have enough business to justify taking myself out of the field full time. I really do not think I can do this until I have at least two full routes of applications. At that time I will dedicate more of my time toward sales and the management of the company.

I believe hiring a salesman at this time is justifiable because the salesman's pay is self generating. The more he sells, the more he makes, the more revenue generated for the company. If he does not sell, I don't owe him anything (and of course he will move on).

Hiring a tech will certainly free me up to concentrate on sales full time but I will have increased my labor beyond the companies means to support it. I will have that techs salary to cover whether the sales come in or not.

The only way I can hire a tech and sell full time is if I were certain I could sell enough accounts to reach two full routes this season. My ego wants to say I can do it but realistically, I think its a long shot. So I'll er on the side of caution on this one.

I will say this though, back when I was mowing I hurt my back and was forced to step off of the mower for several months. At the time I only had $75,000.00 in revenue and was doing it solo (with the exception of a helper in the spring). I used that time to network and sell. The following year I grossed $175,000.00 and did very little mowing myself and continued to spend most of my time selling. The year after that I grossed $300,000.00 and did not touch a mower. I did, however, through out that time continue to do all of my applications with the exception of two rounds I had tech do them. Perhaps I should spend more time evaluating the possibility of taking the same approach with my applications business.

By the way, I only do lawn applications now. I no longer mow or landscape.

David

David, One problem I will touch on is, finding the salesman that will come to work for you with those conditions. Even the best lawncare saleman out there need a good company thats commited to spending money on adv to keep them going. Make sure you have this planned out before you sit with someone and offer them a job.

comperk
01-10-2005, 03:35 PM
Discoverylawn,

I would definitely hire at least a part time tech to free you up to sell. Your numbers say that YOU can and have increased your sales. Why give that up to someone that doesn't know the business or your company? Besides, it would be very tough to go straight commission to sell a product that it very seasonal without a very nice marketing budget. Why hire someone when you are setting them up for failure? Why not do a part time tech and part time salesperson in one position? If you don't have enough clients then a part time tech should work and when the work is done, he can help you sell. That might make more sense. Also, they would have a bit of a base salary from the applications and the sales could be straight commission. That might be a bit more palatable to someone.

Just some thoughts.

James Cormier
01-10-2005, 03:51 PM
Also dont sell yourself short, I would be willing to bet if you hired a full time tech to relieve you for pushing and you could spend all your time selling, you would do fine.

Either way you still gotta commit to spending a certain amount to get those customers.

That might be what you should be asking about, is what you plan to spend to get the amount of customers you want. Then we all can toss around whats the best way to use the money you want to spend, Im sure you would get some great, weird & bad ideas.

DiscoveryLawn
01-10-2005, 04:07 PM
David, One problem I will touch on is, finding the salesman that will come to work for you with those conditions. Even the best lawn care salesman out there need a good company thats committed to spending money on adv to keep them going. Make sure you have this planned out before you sit with someone and offer them a job.

Right now my advertising budget is only $9,000.00. That includes a new full color y/p ad that comes out in February. This only leaves $4000.00 for other forms of advertising. I hope to be able to ad to that budget later in the year but I don't want to count on money that I have not secured or accounted for yet.

I do not believe that I will be able able to generate enough prospects for a salesman to solely rely on my advertising to keep him busy. This why I want to explore door to door sales (knocking) in the area where I already have clients. I have no experience with this for applications so I do not know if a good salesman can close enough sales in this manner to earn a good living at 10% commission. I am going to try it myself for a couple of weeks before I hire someone to do it (if I go this route).

David

DiscoveryLawn
01-10-2005, 04:32 PM
Why not do a part time tech and part time salesperson in one position? If you don't have enough clients then a part time tech should work and when the work is done, he can help you sell. That might make more sense. Also, they would have a bit of a base salary from the applications and the sales could be straight commission. That might be a bit more palatable to someone.

Just some thoughts.
Comperk, that is something I will take a closer look at.

David

James Cormier
01-10-2005, 04:32 PM
Right now my advertising budget is only $9,000.00. That includes a new full color y/p ad that comes out in February. This only leaves $4000.00 for other forms of advertising. I hope to be able to ad to that budget later in the year but I don't want to count on money that I have not secured or accounted for yet.

I do not believe that I will be able able to generate enough prospects for a salesman to solely rely on my advertising to keep him busy. This why I want to explore door to door sales (knocking) in the area where I already have clients. I have no experience with this for applications so I do not know if a good salesman can close enough sales in this manner to earn a good living at 10% commission. I am going to try it myself for a couple of weeks before I hire someone to do it (if I go this route).

David

David, 4k will not support a full time sales guy, But it would do fine for yourself if your willing to make a little less this year to have growth for next year.

Now in my area I could take that 4k and put it into newspaper ads and inserts in the paper and get 100-125 customers, of course the y/p ads helps with that number.

What is your customer base now? And where do you want it too be by the end of rd1 05?

wise_enough
01-10-2005, 04:39 PM
Now in my area I could take that 4k and put it into newspaper ads and inserts in the paper and get 100-125 customers, of course the y/p ads helps with that number.



100-125 new accounts with $4000 worth of newspaper ads??

thats $32-$40 per new account...unless my calculator is broken?

Sounds unrealistic. With that kind of return everone would be in the lawncare business. Or maybe I just need to move into your area?

E-9 Lawncare
01-10-2005, 04:44 PM
The part time tech/sales position might be the way to go here imo, especially if the hiree is knowledgeable and a good salesman. Pay him/her a base salary, then a commission on sale of additional apps (grub, aeration, Manage), and have him door knock in some of the neighborhoods you already work in. You could also give the refer your neighbor discount too...Scotts Lawn service does something similiar, but the commissions are awful though.

DiscoveryLawn
01-10-2005, 04:48 PM
Also dont sell yourself short, I would be willing to bet if you hired a full time tech to relieve you for pushing and you could spend all your time selling, you would do fine.

Either way you still gotta commit to spending a certain amount to get those customers.



James, I have been tempted to do it, but if I do not add 583 new clients with 7k lawns or 460 with 10k all recieving at least 5 apps THIS year, it will not work. Like I said, my ego says I can do it. It's just IF I do not, then I will be in trouble financially. I just don't feel comfortable with taking on that much more risk at this stage. I have already gone a full year with next to no income. I can't possibly make it another year this way.

David

James Cormier
01-10-2005, 05:55 PM
100-125 new accounts with $4000 worth of newspaper ads??

thats $32-$40 per new account...unless my calculator is broken?

Sounds unrealistic. With that kind of return everone would be in the lawncare business. Or maybe I just need to move into your area?

There is a little secret that I have with numbers, You gotta do some searches on my posts to find them :p

Ya that number is a little high, well, not really ( thinking as Im typing ) Several years back when I sold the mowing I needed to add at least 150 customers in one spring.

Not counting y/p and other advertising I had going. I spent around 5k on newspaper ads and met my goals. Mostly with the ads in the paper and Inserts.

Now I will back it up with Ive been selling lawn care for 16 years ( at that time ) and consider myself a good salesman, also exceeded mine and my employers expectations on sales goals all my adult working career.

So I will stand behind those numbers

James Cormier
01-10-2005, 05:57 PM
James, I have been tempted to do it, but if I do not add 583 new clients with 7k lawns or 460 with 10k all recieving at least 5 apps THIS year, it will not work. Like I said, my ego says I can do it. It's just IF I do not, then I will be in trouble financially. I just don't feel comfortable with taking on that much more risk at this stage. I have already gone a full year with next to no income. I can't possibly make it another year this way.

David

Your gonna need more than that 9k total to sell 450- 580 customers, Your just gonna have to do it slow.

Flyscaper
01-11-2005, 10:43 AM
I feel hiring a good salesman ( and i mean good ) can be the best thing anyone one here can do. I have been on both sides of the fence i currently sold my business and now do sales for a company. I am paid a base + commission. The commission is on a floating scale so the more you sell the higher rate you get. I work with 10 other salesman in the company and the numbers we put up are crazy. We are hired to do inside/outside sales and yes we are selling lawn care as we speak. We are selling alot. The job is year around and pays well. The ruff part is finding the right guy for the job. If you guys have any questions please feel free to PM me.

comperk
01-11-2005, 02:34 PM
Flyscaper,

You are correct and I agree with you 100%. However, in this situation, budget is a major concern. How much do you think your company spends on advertising for you to sell those numbers? Or how much do you think it cost to obtain the information on past customers or people that have said no to your service in the past? It is very expensive to keep a full time salesperson doing full time sales work, unless they are devoting part of their time generating their own leads which will decrease the amount of time actually selling.

And make no mistake about it, their are two kinds of salespeople out there, those who sell on price and those who sell on value. You will always have better profit and better customers if you charge a higher price and sell on value. I could take a staff of TG salesmen and put them in my guys chairs and they would fail miserably. They don't know how to sell without slashing prices. They don't sell value. However, I could take my guys and put them in TG's chairs and they would be able to conquer the world. No question. What I am getting at is smaller companies need extra cash to grow or they need to take some serious chances. To get extra cash you need to charge more for your service.

Dreamscape mentioned 480 new customers this year. I can tell you that it is impossible for a smaller company to do that on a limited budget. The amount of paperwork, running the estimates, etc. A full time salesperson, doing things the correct way, might be able to do 200 from January to the end of April with a huge number of call ins and other great leads. Once you start negotiating your price and measuring lawns incorrectly, your company will start going down the wrong road.

I would really consider just taking things slowly and build your company the correct way.

DiscoveryLawn
01-11-2005, 04:05 PM
Comperk, I have 130 estimates that I ran last year that did not go with me. I also have a list of 400+ clients that I had over the years when I used to do a lot of aerations and residential mowing that we will contact. These contacts are certainly valuable to any salesman, I'm sure.

As far as competing with other companies on price ... TG/CL will do my lawn (per their est.) for $50.00, another local company quoted me $72.00 per app. Last year I charged $67.00 for my size lawn but this year I went up to $70.00. I have never sold on price nor do I need to. I know my costs and I know what I need to charge to grow.

As far as the quality of my work ... the referrals speak for themselves. Every one of the lawns I took over this year has improved so drastically that not only are the clients commenting (both in person and in letters with payments) on how much better their lawns look than their neighbors but the neighbors are starting to call, family members and friends. Of course I appreciate the referrals I am getting, but they just aern't enough. If every client sent me one new customer I still will not reach my target this year.

My motivation here is coming from several directions.
- One is of course is financial.
- The biggest motivator to grow quickly is my health. I have a very bad back that is getting worse very quickly. The ride-on has helped but I realize my days are numbered (working in the field).
- There are others, but not necessary to get into for the sake of this discussion.

With the numbers I ran earlier I felt as though I needed to have at least two full routes to step out from behind the spreader. I am now running numbers on hiring a tech/salesman per your suggestion and see how that works out on paper.

Thanks for all of the great advise guys,

David

comperk
01-11-2005, 06:42 PM
Dreamscape,

I reread my post and it seems like I was saying you were selling I certain way. I wasn't trying to say that. Sorry. My point was not to sacrfice your quality or price in order to grow.

It sounds like you are doing a lot of the right things. You are on the right track.

ArizPestWeed
01-11-2005, 10:32 PM
This is easy
Pay 'em 20% of one years gross of each sale .

Meaning , if he sales a pesticide service agreement worth $300.00 for one year , pay him 20% of that .
That's $60.00 for the sale .
Only commision , nothing more .

trying 2b organic
01-12-2005, 01:46 AM
I already took Flyskaper up on his offer for a pm but ill post the jist of it here as well.

I used to work for an indepentdent lawncare provider who had 4 full time sales, 2 managers, 2 office and 10 techs. At that company 80 % of the sales budget was telemarketing. During that time I met someone from a big growing Canadian franchise who was cenralizing all sales by building their own call center.

I was a tech there and didnt sell. Like anyone I hate getting calls from telemarketers and therefore will have trouble doing it. I gave up last spring after an hr. My question is this, is telemarketing far and away the best method of selling lawncare, do I badly need to "get over it" and start selling over the phone and/or hiring someone to help me telemarket. (there are no restrictions on telemarketing that I know of here in Canada) Is this the big secret of the hugely sucessful lawncare companies.

William J. L.
02-04-2005, 05:10 PM
Hey Folks

If my employer expects me to be there every day...40 hours a week..they will have to pay me a salary.
I don't want to get into it too much...but I will tell you that I get a vehicle with gas, salary, commission, benefits and uniforms and I work for a very small company.

No one is going to talk to you for commission only

William J. L.
02-04-2005, 05:15 PM
One more thing!

My employer advertises a lot! So we get the calls. Telemarketing and cold calling is not a normal procedure for me (and its spoilng me :) )

William J. L.
02-05-2005, 01:21 AM
I was thinking of $300.00 per week. However, I really have not done much research in that direction YET so that is just an educated guess.

David
It depends how much experience he has. A seasoned lawn professional will recognize problems and will know facts from myths and will make your company more money

MIDWEST25
02-05-2005, 09:09 AM
Salesman are the way to go.I went from 0 customers to 5000 in 4.5 yrs. Make sure they stay at 12% expense to revenue or less.You need to go balls to the wall till 1st part of May.People have pretty much decided by then what they will do for the season.At that point my guys begin upsell campaigns such as Grub at 2x app cost,tree shrub to the existing lawn base, aeration and seedings and then lime.These campaigns close 25% to 45%.I have never paid salesmen as sub-contract.I would love to save the tax dollars though.Good luck!!!!!!

James Cormier
02-05-2005, 09:51 AM
Salesman are the way to go.I went from 0 customers to 5000 in 4.5 yrs. Make sure they stay at 12% expense to revenue or less.You need to go balls to the wall till 1st part of May.People have pretty much decided by then what they will do for the season.At that point my guys begin upsell campaigns such as Grub at 2x app cost,tree shrub to the existing lawn base, aeration and seedings and then lime.These campaigns close 25% to 45%.I have never paid salesmen as sub-contract.I would love to save the tax dollars though.Good luck!!!!!!

Welcome to LS Midwest.

One very important thing you failed to mention was your marketing budget to reach 5k customers. This thread was started by someone that was trying to maximize his money for new sales. I believe his budget was around 9k for this year.

I agree commission sales people are the best way, BUT you need the marketing plan behind them, it anit gonna work if you just send them out the door and say " sell lawn care "