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View Full Version : First estimate need help


yokes
01-10-2005, 10:29 AM
I need to know what to charge for mowing, trimming, and blowing off a 50,000 sq ft property. It will take around 45 min to complete. There is about 15 min. worth of trimming with the weed eater. There are no hills or other obstacles just a few trees.

J Hisch
01-12-2005, 12:17 AM
135.00 per cut

promower
01-13-2005, 12:46 AM
45 min. to an hour, I would say around $50-$60 a cut.

Young Lawn Boy
01-18-2007, 01:09 AM
I would say $50 a cut

Slcareco
01-18-2007, 01:39 PM
$30 minimum of 5,000 sqft and a dollar for every 1000 sqft after that so $75.00!

sikagrass
01-18-2007, 07:42 PM
Dont get me wrong but seems like it would take me longer than 45 minutes to do a job like that(50,000 s.f.) so 50.00 would seem very low to me.

Uranus
01-18-2007, 07:48 PM
Dont get me wrong but seems like it would take me longer than 45 minutes to do a job like that(50,000 s.f.) so 50.00 would seem very low to me.

Yea I agree. It will take longer than that. If your one guy and have a zrt at full speed then you may get out of there in 45 min in the summer. Not in the spring a week or 2 after the fert kicks in. I wouldn't touch it for anything under $60 per cut. You bagging, throwing, or mulching? And with what kind of mower?

fiveoboy01
01-18-2007, 08:13 PM
Well depends on the mower he's using.

My dad's property is an acre, not exactly flat, and there are about a dozen trees, a jungle gym, and a clothesline to go around.

I can cut it in 40 minutes with the TT. Another 20 to trim and blow off.

If this is flat with few obstacles, and he's using a 60" Z, I can see a fair chunk of time being knocked off that.

In any case, from the description, I'd charge 60-75 per cut.

lawnpro724
01-18-2007, 10:45 PM
thats a little over an acre so I would say somewhere around $75

timmac
01-18-2007, 11:42 PM
If you bid 75 you will not get it. I would charge somewhere between 45-50.

Allure
01-19-2007, 12:07 AM
you need to know your costs before you can quote a job (everyone has different overhead). You also need to know what labor prices your market will support before you quote.

you just received a page full of guesstimates ranging from $45-135. That wide range alone should tell you that this is no way to estimate a job. My recommendation is to invest in this book. it will make your bidding far more accurate & profitable IMHO.
http://www.amazon.com/Price-Landscape-Irrigation-Projects-Greenback/dp/0962852147/sr=1-3/qid=1169182808/ref=sr_1_3/002-1059883-8562444?ie=UTF8&s=books

I took a course in estimating, taught by this guy & it has completely changed my outlook on my business & my estimating.

Steve's Mow & Trim
01-19-2007, 02:04 AM
If its mostly flat open area, and not many obstacles I would probably bid $50-$60......$75 and you likely won't get the account.

Solid
01-19-2007, 02:33 AM
Allure is right. You've got to figure out your overhead and other costs for the best bid. Finding out what others pay in your market can help too. I have a lawn of the same size I charge 140/week. From your description I have more timming and several more trees. Two of us do it in 40-60 min, depending on the length of grass. One mows, the other trims, edges, mows, and blows off. I usually mulch, but she wants it bagged. I use two Walker brand mowers and the other stuff is shindaiwa.

HiTECH
01-19-2007, 05:52 PM
I dont see how it will take you longer than 45 minutes to mow it, 50,000 sq ft is only 1.15 acres. I charge a minimum of $50.00 per acre and that is for something that is wide open and has no trimming i would charge $75.00 for somthing like that.

lawn guy1350
01-19-2007, 08:17 PM
yeh we charge 60 an acre down here, so really its just what u think ur time is worth. down under bid either! never sell yourself short.

Allure
01-19-2007, 08:49 PM
I highly suggest you sign up for a free subscription to Lawn & Landscape
http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/
and read Jim Huston's columns on estimating & benchmarking for your businesses.

I also recommend getting his book How to Price Landscape & Irrigation Projects http://www.amazon.com/Price-Landscape-Irrigation-Projects-Greenback/dp/0962852147/sr=1-1/qid=1169257118/ref=sr_1_1/103-0807338-2592661?ie=UTF8&s=books
you will recover the cost of the book immediately.

if you don't know your General and administrative (G&A) overhead costs & your labor costs you will never bid correctly.

I just took his 2 day seminar & it completely changed my outlook. It cost $595 & i guarantee i will make that money back in my first full day of install work.

Ask yourself why so many people go out of business. Is it because they don't know how to cut grass or because they make mistakes on the business end of it.

Glenn

ed2hess
01-19-2007, 09:34 PM
you need to know your costs before you can quote a job (everyone has different overhead). You also need to know what labor prices your market will support before you quote.

you just received a page full of guesstimates ranging from $45-135. That wide range alone should tell you that this is no way to estimate a job. My recommendation is to invest in this book. it will make your bidding far more accurate & profitable IMHO.
http://www.amazon.com/Price-Landscape-Irrigation-Projects-Greenback/dp/0962852147/sr=1-3/qid=1169182808/ref=sr_1_3/002-1059883-8562444?ie=UTF8&s=books

I took a course in estimating, taught by this guy & it has completely changed my outlook on my business & my estimating.

Think the customer will wait until he finishes reading the book.....by the way they don't care what your overhead is. He has some very good input all very reasonable if he does the job then realizes he didn't make enough then he can send them a 30 day notice. It is called getting real world experience
and data. And if he uses the lowest bid he will still make more than letting the unit set in the garage.

Ric3077
01-19-2007, 10:14 PM
I charge $95 an acre...so for that lot I would charge about $120 no less

topsites
01-20-2007, 01:59 AM
The one thing that is important is it doesn't matter how long it takes, it's about fair market rates.
If an acre goes for $60, then $60 it costs whether it takes 15 minutes with a 12-foot wide 7-gang wide-area mower, or 3 days with a push reel mower.
While it does boil down to hourly rates, it is our responsibility to finish the job in time.
Because from the customer's standpoint it doesn't matter how long it takes you (no offense).

While fair market rates vary some, I'm seeing a range from $45 - $75 here which is about the range from Miami to Niagara.
I myself charge $60 for an acre lot, an acre being 43,560 square feet of turf.
Keep in mind if the property measures 60,000 feet but 20,000 of it is in the woods and the rest is grass, that's 40,000 square feet of turf minus the square footage of the house (assume 2,000) = 38,000 square feet.

But, the guy said 50k.
That's 1.16 acres.

While I'm in Virginia and you're in Ohio, I would assume our prices to be about the same.
If you want the job, bid $55.
If you'd like more money, try 60-65, maybe 70.
Technically, a $60 acre x 1.16 = $70, but 65 is fair.
I think 75's pushing it.
And 45-50 is lowballing lol (at least for this area).

Because brother, somehow I don't think these great fuel prices are going to last.

Good luck.

newbomb
01-20-2007, 09:30 AM
I highly suggest you sign up for a free subscription to Lawn & Landscape
http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/
and read Jim Huston's columns on estimating & benchmarking for your businesses.

I also recommend getting his book How to Price Landscape & Irrigation Projects http://www.amazon.com/Price-Landscape-Irrigation-Projects-Greenback/dp/0962852147/sr=1-1/qid=1169257118/ref=sr_1_1/103-0807338-2592661?ie=UTF8&s=books
you will recover the cost of the book immediately.

if you don't know your General and administrative (G&A) overhead costs & your labor costs you will never bid correctly.

I just took his 2 day seminar & it completely changed my outlook. It cost $595 & i guarantee i will make that money back in my first full day of install work.

Ask yourself why so many people go out of business. Is it because they don't know how to cut grass or because they make mistakes on the business end of it.

Glenn

Amen Learning the business end is important and hard to do by yourself. You make your money with your pen and justify it with your sweat.

CkLandscapingOrlando
02-01-2007, 10:01 PM
Think the customer will wait until he finishes reading the book.....by the way they don't care what your overhead is. He has some very good input all very reasonable if he does the job then realizes he didn't make enough then he can send them a 30 day notice. It is called getting real world experience
and data. And if he uses the lowest bid he will still make more than letting the unit set in the garage.
your right.Besides, most of us have around the same cost.How many times can you spread out your monthly cost?Every time you pick up a new account,It would lower your cost,and I bet you would'nt lower your rate.

HOOLIE
02-02-2007, 12:36 AM
I guess nobody noticed this thread is 2 years old...I'm sure he doesn't need any advice by now :laugh:

Clear-Cut
02-02-2007, 12:51 AM
who the hell keeps reviving these old threads?

HOOLIE
02-02-2007, 01:10 AM
who the hell keeps reviving these old threads?

I don't know but it should be required to post an "OLD THREAD" disclaimer when you revive one :laugh:

Uranus
02-02-2007, 01:49 AM
I don't know but it should be required to post an "OLD THREAD" disclaimer when you revive one :laugh:

Agreed. Some of these oldies need a disclaimer or just get thrown in the trash.
We need an "archive threads"
Its funny I posted on the first page. Its date threw me off. 1-10-xx I saw it, and it looked new to me cuz there were only a few post made before me.