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View Full Version : Help with poa anna and goosegrass


Luscious Lawns
01-11-2005, 09:07 AM
With the safety concerns about atrazine compounds, I'm looking for a selective cool season grass killer. I looked into Revolver but it is not labeled for residental turf. What is residental labeled for selective cool season grasses. We'll be using this over bermuda turf.

timturf
01-11-2005, 06:14 PM
roundup will work great on bermunda, when it is dormant

ThreeWide
01-11-2005, 10:33 PM
Revolver is now labeled for residential turf unless I am mistaken.

As Timturf said, you can use glyphosate for winter weeds. Just make certain the Bermuda is truly dormant. I'm in your area, and despite the warm temps of late, the Bermuda is still dormant. Still need to keep an eye on that as every lawn is different. If it isn't all dormant today, just wait another week for the cold weather to return.

Also, you can use Simazine to get rid of the Poa. Simazine is very similar to Atrazine, but without the baggage. Even though Simazine is a pre-emergent, it has good post control on Poa and other grassy weeds. In fact, you can subsitute it for other pre-ems this time of year.

Revolver is a sure thing on your Poa, but it is also costly.

snap12.5
01-12-2005, 12:17 AM
will this stuff work on controlling creeping bentgrass?

Luscious Lawns
01-12-2005, 07:20 AM
You're right Turf unlimited. I had foolishly believed what Lesco said and had posted to their webpage. After checking with CDMS, on 8-5-2003 Revolver was re-labeled for residential turf.

Way to go Lesco. You're only 16 months late with your product update.

Allen

TurfGuyTX
01-15-2005, 01:50 AM
Revolver is now labeled for residential turf unless I am mistaken.

As Timturf said, you can use glyphosate for winter weeds. Just make certain the Bermuda is truly dormant. I'm in your area, and despite the warm temps of late, the Bermuda is still dormant. Still need to keep an eye on that as every lawn is different. If it isn't all dormant today, just wait another week for the cold weather to return.

Also, you can use Simazine to get rid of the Poa. Simazine is very similar to Atrazine, but without the baggage. Even though Simazine is a pre-emergent, it has good post control on Poa and other grassy weeds. In fact, you can subsitute it for other pre-ems this time of year.

Revolver is a sure thing on your Poa, but it is also costly.

Thanks for the info.

T Edwards
01-15-2005, 07:53 AM
Can you guys tell me how to pronounce "poa annua" phonetically? I've heard it butchered many ways, but mainly I hear "po AN' na".
Thanks.

Luscious Lawns
01-15-2005, 08:18 AM
With our southern accent (po AN a) sounds about right to me.
BTW with the warm weather we've had lately the Revolver has already started to wilt the Poa. Looks like Revolver is the silver bullet. However at $175.00 a quart a brodcast app. would be very expensive.

khutch
01-15-2005, 04:07 PM
With the warm GA. winter this year, how can you be sure the bermuda is really dormant

timturf
01-15-2005, 06:44 PM
With the warm GA. winter this year, how can you be sure the bermuda is really dormant

What does dormant turf look like?

Luscious Lawns
01-16-2005, 10:00 AM
Dormant bermuda is a dull brown exibiting no green in the color it will be slightly "krispy" to the touch.

In the early days I tried Gly. over "dormant" bermuda. With distasterous results. It seems there is always some active grass that will absorbe the Gly. You will not be aware of the damage until spring green.

Also the main turf can be dormant, and there will be a strip still green around walls from the radiated heat

Bottom line.....It is very difficult to dertermine when bermuda is totally dormant.

Allen

ThreeWide
01-16-2005, 02:03 PM
If you look down to the soil level and see no green at all where you are spraying, there is little danger in spot spraying Glyphosate for winter weeds with a 1% or less formulation.

Should you broadcast the entire area, there MIGHT be some spots near driveways and curbs that would be injured. Every lawn seems to have its spots where the turf breaks dormancy during winter warm spells.

I will say this though....before spraying it on dormant Bermuda, monitor the soil temperatures. This will give you a good indicator whether there is any concern of actively growing turf. If it is above 50 degrees at 4", I wouldn't do it.

timturf
01-16-2005, 02:15 PM
If you look down to the soil level and see no green at all where you are spraying, there is little danger in spot spraying Glyphosate for winter weeds with a 1% or less formulation.

Should you broadcast the entire area, there MIGHT be some spots near driveways and curbs that would be injured. Every lawn seems to have its spots where the turf breaks dormancy during winter warm spells.

I will say this though....before spraying it on dormant Bermuda, monitor the soil temperatures. This will give you a good indicator whether there is any concern of actively growing turf. If it is above 50 degrees at 4", I wouldn't do it.

Have you seen studies that state bermunda breaks dormancy when soil temp is above 50 degrees

khutch
01-16-2005, 09:00 PM
We're right back to my question - "How do you know it's dormant?" 15 degrees for a couple weeks, yea maybe. Looks brown and brittle.
I don't know for sure.....Sure has been a mild winter in the Atlanta area. 2 inch temps have barely been below 50. I don't think much bermuda is dormant around here.....

ThreeWide
01-16-2005, 11:08 PM
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Have you seen studies that state bermunda breaks dormancy when soil temp is above 50 degrees

Actually yes..... this below is quoted from a University of California publication:

All bermudagrasses enter a dormancy period if grown where
winter soil temperatures drop below 50 - 55°F The grass may re-main
dormant for up to 5 months (until the soil temperature rises
above 50-55 F) depending on location and cultivar

timturf
01-17-2005, 08:58 AM
Actually yes..... this below is quoted from a University of California publication:

All bermudagrasses enter a dormancy period if grown where
winter soil temperatures drop below 50 - 55°F The grass may re-main
dormant for up to 5 months (until the soil temperature rises
above 50-55 F) depending on location and cultivar

Turf unlimitive,

my experiece in the past, when reading research stating soil temps, they seldom state the depth that they are measuring the soil temps!

As in your quote from university of california, NO MENTION OF DEPTH THAT TEMPERATURE WAS TAKEN!

ThreeWide
01-17-2005, 10:40 AM
Turf unlimitive,

my experiece in the past, when reading research stating soil temps, they seldom state the depth that they are measuring the soil temps!

As in your quote from university of california, NO MENTION OF DEPTH THAT TEMPERATURE WAS TAKEN!

Point well taken.

Soil temp is still a clue worth considering when there is a concern about dormancy.

timturf
01-17-2005, 12:43 PM
Point well taken.

Soil temp is still a clue worth considering when there is a concern about dormancy.

I agree, but the information from university of cal, is of really little use, if they don't state the depth that the temperature was taken! If they would release more data about the study, the information would be so helpful!

Again, the lack of necessary research data from research centers to make pratical use of their research is frustrating!

Triple R
01-17-2005, 08:34 PM
I usually use Reward and turn the lawn an even brown, I think it looks better then having patches of green. And there is no visible damage in the spring, also very cost effective about $.50 per gallon of dilluted product. Any comments?