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MowingisMaddness
01-15-2005, 09:52 AM
When did Caterpillar start making the B series skid steers? I am in the market for a Cat skid steer and need some help. Is there a way to tell if it is a B series just by a picture? Other ways? Will it say 262B, or just 262? There is a used unit online that I am interested in. It is a 2002 model, but just says 262 on it???

Thanks, aj

Tigerotor77W
01-16-2005, 10:30 AM
B-series production began around April 2004, I believe. (Probably not exact time, but give or take a month or two.)

ALL Cat B-series skid steers will have "B" following the model number (eg, 262B).

The top of the cab has a yellow line running arund its sides; the frame towers are now mostly Cat yellow rather than black, as they were previously. The chassis is mostly black now instead of being yellow as it was before. The red strip going around the rear door has changed slightly but it's probably a moot point and it'[s not that big a change. Other than that, not too many other appearance changes that I can think o. Maybe some others have other comments.

DavidD
01-22-2005, 08:40 PM
I Demo'd a 242,252,262, and a bobcat S250. None of the cats had any Traction!
Very Tipsy. I bought the S250 Love It! The 252 is still sitting here Guess they will pick it up one day. :blob3:

MowingisMaddness
01-22-2005, 09:58 PM
That is interesting ;) Currently, I am in the process of demoing different units. It is hard for me to be unbias toward cat. For some reason, I am a caterpillar fan and not a bobcat fan by nature. I have demoed a Bobcat T190 and that thing beat the daylights out of me. I briefly demoed a S185 and definity felt it was tipsy. Now I am waiting to demo a Cat 252 or 262.

DavidD,
I would have guessed you would have said the opposite about the Bobcat versus Cat. I really want hand controls, and don't understand why Bobcat has to make it such a premium option?

Thanks, aj

jd270
01-23-2005, 12:30 AM
my buddy has a t 190 he likes it for sod work but hates it for snow work he says it has no traction in snow and he uses a deere 260 for snow he wont run the cat a friend of his ran the track off on a steep grade

Tigerotor77W
01-23-2005, 10:14 AM
That is interesting ;) Currently, I am in the process of demoing different units. It is hard for me to be unbias toward cat. For some reason, I am a caterpillar fan and not a bobcat fan by nature. I have demoed a Bobcat T190 and that thing beat the daylights out of me. I briefly demoed a S185 and definity felt it was tipsy. Now I am waiting to demo a Cat 252 or 262.

DavidD,
I would have guessed you would have said the opposite about the Bobcat versus Cat. I really want hand controls, and don't understand why Bobcat has to make it such a premium option?

Thanks, aj

I hate to say this, but if you're demoing a 252 or 262 and an S185, you're really not demoing machines that are even close by comparison. If you want to buy a S185, the appropriate Cat machine to demo is the 232B or 242B (232B is closer in ROC; the 242B is closer to the S205). Comparing such a large machine as the 252B to a much smaller machine such as the S185 is about one of the biggest ways the dealer can bias you. Don't get me wrong -- I'm a Cat person -- but do realize that in order to conduct a fair cmoparison, you really need to consider machines of the same size class.

As for hand controls... I'm not sure of the answer, either.

MowingisMaddness
01-23-2005, 01:54 PM
I hate to say this, but if you're demoing a 252 or 262 and an S185, you're really not demoing machines that are even close by comparison. If you want to buy a S185, the appropriate Cat machine to demo is the 232B or 242B (232B is closer in ROC; the 242B is closer to the S205). Comparing such a large machine as the 252B to a much smaller machine such as the S185 is about one of the biggest ways the dealer can bias you. Don't get me wrong -- I'm a Cat person -- but do realize that in order to conduct a fair cmoparison, you really need to consider machines of the same size class.

As for hand controls... I'm not sure of the answer, either.

Thank you Bobcat S250,

I do realize the diffence in ROC for the units I have demoed so far... :waving: I am planning on demoing a S250 as well... I wanted to see if the S185 would meet my needs first...

Tigerotor77W
01-23-2005, 02:51 PM
Cool... sorry bout the confusion. :)

zedosix
12-30-2006, 10:48 AM
I Demo'd a 242,252,262, and a bobcat S250. None of the cats had any Traction!
Very Tipsy. I bought the S250 Love It! The 252 is still sitting here Guess they will pick it up one day. :blob3:

I would love to follow up on the tippiness of the cat loaders. I did try one I think a 216 model many years ago and hated it for that very reason. It bounced all over the place, really unstable. Can anyone else relate to this exp.

Tigerotor77W
12-30-2006, 11:47 AM
zedosix -- I found that it really depends on the operating technique. I was accustomed to a 236's weight distribution (well, as accustomed to it as six hours -- across four or five operating days -- will allow!), and this summer had the opportunity to run a 226B. That thing jarred the heck out of me, but watching a operator who knew how to compensate for the short wheelbase was a world of difference. So while I can relate to your experience, I think it's possible to use that size machine effectively. (Same can be said for the white brand.)

Scag48
12-30-2006, 12:00 PM
Cat's are very stable if you know how to run them. Just like any piece, demo'ing doesn't really do them justice for overall feel unless you're in the machine 8+ hours. You need to be in one a while to figure out how they work, as with any brand of machine. Cat's are as stable as any machine out there, if not better than some of the smaller Bobcats. I know B series 216's have a longer wheelbase than a Bobcat S130. When we bought our 216 the same was true as well.

zedosix
12-30-2006, 06:19 PM
I agree guys, demoing them is the only way to go. Got to get a bit of saddle time in to really appr. how they work.