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j fisher
02-01-2005, 04:57 PM
Can you guys ID this grassy weed. Pops up in the winter. I've searched some weed sites, but can't find this one. Is it some type of perrinial rye? It grows in clumps.

lawnprosteveo
02-01-2005, 05:29 PM
This is just a guess, cause I'm still pretty much a rookie...but is that fescue?

TClawn
02-01-2005, 05:35 PM
it almost looks like kyllinga, but not quite. do you have a pic thats more of a closup

stumper1620
02-01-2005, 06:09 PM
Has it been warm around your area,? sure looks like crabgrass to me.

mownredneck
02-01-2005, 06:20 PM
It looks like grass to me. Ha I think it might be rie grass?

cleancutccl
02-01-2005, 06:25 PM
Looks like some grass, thin blade fescue or rye. Too small a picture to really tell. Definitely not crabgrass.

DSIM
02-01-2005, 06:54 PM
looks like either goose grass or rescue grass

stumper1620
02-01-2005, 06:56 PM
I didn't look that close before, all I noticed was the stalk in the bunch, I zoomed in on it and I agree with mownredneck & cleancut, sure looks like rye.

DennisF
02-01-2005, 07:03 PM
Winter Rye. Many lawns and golf courses in Florida are over-seeded with in the winter months. It dies off when the warm weather arrives. That looks like dormant St.Augustine around it.

j fisher
02-01-2005, 07:27 PM
Thanks for the replies, but I can tell you that it is not crabgrass, fescue or winter rye. I know all of these grasses and it's not any of them. Tclawn, Kyllinga is one I'm not familiar with. I'll research that one. Anybody else have any idea?

Ric
02-01-2005, 08:17 PM
Thanks for the replies, but I can tell you that it is not crabgrass, fescue or winter rye. I know all of these grasses and it's not any of them. Tclawn, Kyllinga is one I'm not familiar with. I'll research that one. Anybody else have any idea?

J fisher

We really need a Close up to tell what this is. However My first reaction was Sedge. Find the center stalk and see if it is Triangular in shape.

I don't think anyone made a bad guess given the Picture.

j fisher
02-01-2005, 08:24 PM
Thanks Ric. I wasn't criticizing anyones guesses. Hope it did'nt come across that way. I appreciate all responses. I'll try to get a better pic tomorrow.

j fisher
02-01-2005, 08:43 PM
Well, I've researched Kyllinga and sledge. It's not either of those. This stuff only grows about 3 or 4 inches high. By the way, the first picture in my original post was taken from about 2 feet away. Look at it again. This stuff is only 3 inches. Freezing temps. snow, and ice dosn't faze it.

Norm Al
02-01-2005, 09:07 PM
looks like SEDGE

mowerman111
02-01-2005, 09:41 PM
the second picture looks like poa annua but the clumps in the first picture look to big for it.

Ric
02-01-2005, 09:48 PM
looks like SEDGE


J Fisher

Sedge is very cold hardy. Is this a wet area?? and why is the turf around it Dead?? Sedge is not Susceptible to Fungus, Insects or Herbicide.

I once had a customer with a 100% Sedge Yard. Yes it was a product of mis-management. However it was the easiest yard to care for. Weed control was Roundup and it did not require any fertilizer. About the only control needed was for ants and they didn't effect the sedge.

marko
02-01-2005, 10:29 PM
Im with mowerman. Annual Bluegrass. Especially the 2nd picture.

ThreeWide
02-01-2005, 10:30 PM
I'm not positive because of the photos, but it looks like Poa Annua to me. When the plants mature in warmer weather they would produce white seedheads. Young Poa can be confused with many other grassy weeds.

Another reason I guess Poa is because it is so common this time of year in the South.

mowerman111
02-01-2005, 10:33 PM
this is poa annua

http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/g...lBluegrass.html

ThreeWide
02-01-2005, 10:37 PM
Here is a mature photo....what you have might be before seedhead stage.

http://www.ppdl.purdue.edu/ppdl/images/pannua3.gif

Fantasy Lawns
02-01-2005, 10:55 PM
Sand Spur or Sedge ??

http://fantasylawns.com/Sandspur.jpg

o-so-n-so
02-01-2005, 11:22 PM
I would have to go with Annual Bluegrass with a touch of wild garlic at top next to fence post growing in a dormant centipede lawn.

Compacted soils is where the annual bluegrass loves to grow.......

i_plant_art
02-01-2005, 11:35 PM
just as turfunlimited said it is poa anna it is REALLY common here in the south this time of year that stuff gets everywhere beds, tree rings, turf, cement cracks ANYWHERE UGH it drives us rednecks crazy LOL

AlbeLawn
02-02-2005, 01:36 AM
Poa Annua( annual bluegrass) Look at the edge of the blade. if the tip of the blade looks like a boat haul (curled Up)then it is a bluegrass, most likely poa annua. if the tip looks like a sword with a point then it is a Rhy grass.
If it is poa annua then it is very hard to get rid of. It is mostly a problem on golf greens. But it can be a problem if her is a lot in a lawn due to the change in the green color. It will also burn up in the summer and will thrive in the spring and fall. like cool weather and moisture. My guess is poa annua. Hope this helps.

Jim Albenesius
Albenesius Lawn Service

jeffex
02-02-2005, 05:56 AM
It could be loriope or monkey grass. That is the first thin to pop up on 2 of my lawns. It has thicker blades. It may be growing in a southern exposure and comming up early. Just a guess, hard to tell from pictures but the circular shape of the first pic. looks familiar

YardPro
02-02-2005, 07:32 AM
here in nc it's poa annua, i'll guarantee
we have kyllinga, and it's dormant now.

since you're in fayatville call brent or niel at jonn deere landscapes and they can come out and id it for you and sell you the stuff to get rid of it.

j fisher
02-02-2005, 07:49 AM
[QUOTE=Ric]J Fisher

Sedge is very cold hardy. Is this a wet area?? and why is the turf around it Dead??

No, it's not a wet area, and the turf is not dead. It dormant centipede. These pics were taken this week.
From the responses I've recieved, I'm pretty sure now that it's poa annua.
Thanks everybody for the replies.

mownredneck
02-02-2005, 05:03 PM
Then what does rye grass look like?

Ric
02-02-2005, 05:56 PM
Then what does rye grass look like?


GREEN :D

Geezer
02-02-2005, 08:03 PM
Poa annua, no doubt.

It can be prevented with pre-emergent application of Kerb, Ronstar or Barricade (there are others as well). Pre -em apps are definitely a must if you are maintaining any sort of monoculture of turf whether it is any of the warm seasons or as previously mentioned, a golf green. It can not take the summer heat and will die out...but it will be back. It appears that Poa is growing in a predominantly common Bermuda turf that is dormant. You should consider a pre-em SOON for the suppression of summer weedy grasses.

DFW Area Landscaper
02-02-2005, 08:14 PM
I use Pre-M on all my lawns in the fall, winter and spring. I get a lot of poa annua along foundations and other random places. Pre-M seems to have no effect on poa annua. I'm gonna ask my Lesco dealer for a better pre-emergence that is more targeted for poa annua that I can apply in the fall. Pre-M works really for crabgrass, though.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

Hodge
02-02-2005, 09:18 PM
DFW,

Have the same in my customer yards and thought it was Poa but it even persist during the summer months. Pulled a clump and took to the Ex service....Annual Bluegrass. Round up it now while the Bermuda is dormant and it might require another treatment before it Bermuda greens up...

GroundKprs
02-03-2005, 12:17 AM
J Fisher, you can easily ID this plant yourself. Take a look at the initial discussion in this thread (http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=37969).

Grab a few of the plants in question, sit at your computer, and go to: Turfgrass ID KEY (http://aggie-turf.tamu.edu/aggieturf2/grasswee/grasses/grasskey/startkey.html). Just take your time the first few times you do it, and you'll be an expert at ID in a short time.

Geezer
02-03-2005, 11:40 PM
Poa annua IS annual bluegrass.

Family: Gramineae

Genus: Poa (Bluegrasses)

Specie : annua (annual)

ThreeWide
02-04-2005, 08:01 PM
I use Pre-M on all my lawns in the fall, winter and spring. I get a lot of poa annua along foundations and other random places. Pre-M seems to have no effect on poa annua. I'm gonna ask my Lesco dealer for a better pre-emergence that is more targeted for poa annua that I can apply in the fall. Pre-M works really for crabgrass, though.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper


DFW,

This past fall I used pendimethalin for the most part, with barricade on a couple of properties. Pedimethalin has done a fantastic job of preventing Poa Annua. Barricade wasn't quite as good, but I didn't have enough samples to make it a fair comparison. I possibly could have went too low on the barricade application. I can tell you for certain that pedimethalin WILL prevent it. This was all granular BTW.

Another good product for Poa Annua prevention is Simazine. It will not only prevent it, but it will also work as a post on already present Poa. Almost the best thing since sliced bread when you are fighting Poa in Bermuda turf. It is a good option if you take over a new account this time of year that has been poorly maintained. You can spray it in the Fall and Winter, as long as you are not close to greenup time.

Doster's L & L
02-05-2005, 12:42 AM
I believe you are in the transition zone right? Well, we have some Star of Bethlehem here, aka snow drops. That may be what you have. It doesnt get very tall, maybe about 6" if its not cut. It is VERY sappy. It will clog the underside of your deck if there is an infestation of the stuff. At maturity, it will have a small, white cluster of flowers that hang over and they look like bells. Also, another thing, the leaves have a light colored stripe down the center with a pointed tip and the plant is bulbous.

I cant really tell what it is because the pictures are not close-ups, but hopefully the descriptions you've been given will help distinguish what you're looking at.

Controls... This little booger is hard to kill! Three-Way will help control it. Round Up super concentrated will help knock it down too. Basically, anything that will help on wild onions will halfway work on Star of Bethlehem.

Oh, BTW, it could be poa annua too.

Markf
02-05-2005, 01:06 AM
Maybe this site will help.
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7464.html


Good Luck.
Mark

aniruddha
02-05-2005, 01:18 AM
it looks like goose grass to me :cool: payup

aniruddha
02-05-2005, 01:21 AM
it looks like goose grass to me

DFW Area Landscaper
02-05-2005, 08:52 AM
Hodge,

I plan to use Simizine for my fall pre-emergent next year. I'll still use Lesco Pre-M in the spring.

I bought a $75 bottle of Corsaire this year and when we treated the lawns in December, I treated all poa annua and fescue. If you ever take over an account from one of those LCO's who overseed their lawns in the winter just so they can mow it, you'll know what I'm talking about with the fescue. Corsaire has two different mixture rates for poa and for fescue. In order to knock out fescue, you have to mix it up five times as strong.

To make a long story short, don't waste your money on Corsaire. The weeds are still as green today as they were when we treated them six weeks ago. They're not even showing any signs of stress.

I've had several LCO's recommend glyphosphate for these weeds. I'm really scared of doing this. How many ounces of concentrate per gallon are you mixing? In the summer, I'll mix 6 to 8 ounces into a backpack. I was thinking of trying maybe a 1/4 ounce in a backpack for dormant bermuda and see what happens.

One LCO I spoke with this week even recommended glysphosphate for dallisgrass. Ever try that?

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper