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View Full Version : whats's wrong with these tomatoes?


Guthrie&Co
02-02-2005, 08:26 PM
http://community.webshots.com/album/265180354yFEkVg

here is the link

geogunn
02-02-2005, 09:27 PM
needs bone meal???

GEO :eek:

Pecker
02-02-2005, 09:43 PM
Perhaps too much nitrogen in the fertilizer.

bobbygedd
02-02-2005, 09:58 PM
i'm gonna take a stab and say they are lacking phosphorus. do u know the answer?

Ric
02-02-2005, 09:58 PM
Perhaps too much nitrogen in the fertilizer.




I will agree with the Guy who's screen name will come a bunch of *** I will also agree with the who is a ******:D. Way too much vegetative growth. Also the High N has exacerbated Fungus.

Smalltimer1
02-02-2005, 10:07 PM
Sometimes a low pH (meaning acid) will cause that as well, it looks as if they burned themselves from the inside out.

Guthrie&Co
02-02-2005, 10:12 PM
thanks gents.

BOTURF
02-02-2005, 10:13 PM
by just looking at pics ( iam a greenhouse grower in winter time ) and without further testing by your ag agent , its looks like bacteria wilt probally should have been sprayed with a fungicide ( possibily bravo )

Jeff@SGLC.ca
02-02-2005, 11:07 PM
They look dead......

Guthrie&Co
02-02-2005, 11:15 PM
what about a nematode? a possibility? by the way a guy asked me to post these pics and to see what was wrong.

Ric
02-03-2005, 09:52 AM
what about a nematode? a possibility? by the way a guy asked me to post these pics and to see what was wrong.


Scaby

When I used to grow an garden, I didn't have Nematode problems but, Tomatoes are famous for them. Normally it take several years for their population to increase to a level where they effect the plant. Has this area been growing tomatoes in the same spot for many years?? Solarization is the only way to get rid of them. Tomatoes should be rotated. However most Truck farmer in my area just cover the fields with black Plastic during the heat of summer. Our Tomato growing season is winter. Summer is too hot for them.

twins_lawn_care
02-03-2005, 10:47 AM
Looks like they were grown at the Neverland Ranch :jester:

sorry, couldn't resist

DFW Area Landscaper
02-03-2005, 10:59 AM
University of Florida has a pretty good web sight on tomato disease identification:

http://ftsg.ifas.ufl.edu/DISMIK.HTM

My gut feeling is that this is a fungus. You can sure spend a lot of money on fungicides in no time at all. But if you correctly identify the fungus and treat with the correct fingicide, you'll be happy in the end.

Good luck,
DFW Area Landscaper

Ric
02-03-2005, 11:17 AM
I will agree with the Guy who's screen name will come a bunch of *** I will also agree with the who is a ******:D. Way too much vegetative growth. Also the High N has exacerbated Fungus.


DFW

My reaction also about the Fungus.

timturf
02-03-2005, 11:21 AM
He should post this in the organic forum,

they will tell him to feed the soil with compost, everything then will be fine. I may have over simplified it, but you get the message!

Ric
02-03-2005, 11:42 AM
He should post this in the organic forum,

they will tell him to feed the soil with compost, everything then will be fine. I may have over simplified it, but you get the message!


Tim

Yes Mr. Dchall will surely help him out with his Milk and honey to cure the Fungus. :rolleyes:

timturf
02-03-2005, 12:00 PM
Tim

Yes Mr. Dchall will surely help him out with his Milk and honey to cure the Fungus. :rolleyes:

And I thought all he needed was good old compost, or was it compost tea?

Critical Care
02-03-2005, 12:04 PM
The plants appear to be suffering from either Fusarium or Verticillium wilt, a soil-borne pathogen that commonly attacks tomatoes as well as some other plants. The fungi invade the plant through the root system and will disrupt the water uptake within the plant. That's why you see much of the plant drying out. Fusarium likes warmer soil temperatures; verticillium likes relatively cool temps. I've had this problem myself back in California.

It's important to purchase plants that are resistant to this, and it can be very hard to get rid of the fungal disease out of the soil. You have to rotate other resistant crops into the area, probably for years, just to help matters. Someone mentioned solarization which is the best bet to start out with - shoot for 30 days of this if possible. Serious gowers also use a methyl bromide (tear gas) fumigant in combination with solarization.

And, it looks like the plants could have two problems. Some close up pictures of the tomato fruit itself appear like the picture below, spotted wilt virus, a virus commonly transmitted by little bugs called thrips. Good luck trying to treat this virus.

Ric
02-03-2005, 12:07 PM
And I thought all he needed was good old compost, or was it compost tea?


Korn Tim

Yes Korn meal is the real answer to every thing. It can kill crabgrass and cure fungus. I am surprised you didn't know that with a degree in horticulture and 30 years in the business. You need to spent more time in the orgasmos forum.