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View Full Version : How do you go from mowing, to applications?


KINGjosh
02-03-2005, 12:29 AM
How would someone go from offering typicall mowing and trimming services to also adding applications. What I mean is, lets say you mow full time and want to get a applicators liscence, but they require 3 years apprenticeship, Would you have to work with some one else for 3 years then take the test all while manage a LCO on a full time basis?

ChadA
02-03-2005, 12:40 AM
I have wondered the same thing myself. Thanks to Ric im looking into taking some classes in Entomology or Horticulture so I can get my license. Thanks again Ric.

KINGjosh
02-03-2005, 12:41 AM
after you took those classes would you be eligable?

PMLAWN
02-03-2005, 06:29 AM
This may or may not work, I don't know FLA. But can you hire a guy that is licensed and have him work for your company but teach you and let you work under him till you had the time put in? I don't think you want to drop him right after 3 years but if in the future he were to leave would you not be able to do it on your own? Again this is just a thought and question.

GarPA
02-03-2005, 06:37 AM
I'm all for applicators being trained, certified and insured. In PA you have to prove that your business liability coverage includes chemical coverage before you are licensed/certified. But a 3 year reqt b4 you can get certified in FLA seems a bit much... :dizzy:

MOW ED
02-03-2005, 07:29 AM
I took the liberty of copying the site that Jim (GroundKprs) referenced in the Pesticide forum. There is a phone number on the top for the agency in Florida that will answer your question. Good Luck.

http://www.flaes.org/Pesticide/index.htm

timturf
02-03-2005, 08:20 AM
How would someone go from offering typicall mowing and trimming services to also adding applications. What I mean is, lets say you mow full time and want to get a applicators liscence, but they require 3 years apprenticeship, Would you have to work with some one else for 3 years then take the test all while manage a LCO on a full time basis?


Get your fert and pest license, BUT GET AN EDUCATION how the plant grows, how to properly take care of! The license is only the beginning, get educated, college or self taught! Their is alot more to it than going to lesco, (or who ever), and asking the salesman what to buy and apply! Some are very educated, but most aren't!

GarPA
02-03-2005, 08:54 AM
Get your fert and pest license, BUT GET AN EDUCATION how the plant grows, how to properly take care of! The license is only the beginning, get educated, college or self taught! Their is alot more to it than going to lesco, (or who ever), and asking the salesman what to buy and apply! Some are very educated, but most aren't!

amen to this point of view....you may also want to think real hard about whether you even want to get into fert/chemical work in any substantial way beyond the occasionally zapping of a weed or two. It takes many years and different weather cycles to really get competent with diseases and insect identification and the appropriate treatment called for. In addition, fert work will almost certainly require you to do service calls when Granny finds a dandy in her back yard. Plus, you wont be able to buy chemicals at as good a price as the big boys. And what if you accidentally burn an entire lawn? It can happen. THese are factors to look at real hard if the revenue is really worth the effort you'll have to put into it. We sub most of our fert apps but...we also control what they put down...i.e. no TruBurn amounts of N that would make our maintenance a nightmare....you might want to consider this approach if your customer asks you for fert service. I'm a firm believer that you can't be an expert in all things in this business. DO what you're competent at and hand off the other stuff

jborchers
02-03-2005, 07:52 PM
Anyone who gives the advice of researching application first is on the right track. Application is not just the dumping of products to get a desired result. In this business customer service and education must be your main goal. If not you'll never truly be succesful. If the customer is properly educated and coached in the right cultivation practices your service calls will be fewer and product costs will be lower.And you will also be kinder to the enviroment...weed suppression is more than a blanket app of tri-power (or whatever product you use)

KINGjosh
02-03-2005, 08:11 PM
Well eventually i would like to get into this because of the extreme knowledge, I beleive there is not likely to be as much fierce competion in this arena. I have only seen one lawn co that also does applications in my part of town. I believe this is where i would like to take my bussiness in the next 5-6 years

Tharrell
02-03-2005, 08:32 PM
I've been licensed here in NC for several years. I was thinking of moving back to FLA and contacted the dept of ag down there via email. I would still have to apprentice for someone or hire someone and work under their license. My license would only count for half of their apprentice requirements. There are workarounds if you know someone down there. For instance, I only have to list the names of someone working for me with the dept of ag and their time starts.

KINGjosh
02-03-2005, 09:08 PM
Lets say i did hire some one with theier own liscence, Starting out I wouldnt have enepogh work for them to have a full month. plus I would like to learn as much as i could , not only charge for these services and then collect

jborchers
02-04-2005, 08:41 AM
If you need some help getting started I may be of assistance...jborchers@prohealthultra.com