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021462
02-03-2005, 06:50 PM
I have had several year round customers cancel in the winter when I am supposed to be making my money back from them. I am begining to wonder if going to billing them monthly isn't the better way to go. You know what I mean, I set them up on a flat monthly charge for 12 months. Everything is fine during the mowing season when you see them regularly but, when the off season rolls around they call up and cancel and you lose money. I doesn't happen alot but enough to make me consider only offering a monthly billing cycle. Anyone else have this problem?

SprinklerGuy
02-03-2005, 07:00 PM
I would think a properly worded contract would stand up in court and you could get the difference?

40 cuts at 40 each for a grand total of 1600 bucks.....133.33 per month right?

you cut for 9 months at 133.33 per month...reality is they only paid 1200 bucks for 1600 worth of mowing.....any judge would rule with you IF your contract was worded properly.

Wouldn't they?

geogunn
02-03-2005, 07:00 PM
I have had several year round customers cancel in the winter when I am supposed to be making my money back from them. I am begining to wonder if going to billing them monthly isn't the better way to go. You know what I mean, I set them up on a flat monthly charge for 12 months. Everything is fine during the mowing season when you see them regularly but, when the off season rolls around they call up and cancel and you lose money. I doesn't happen alot but enough to make me consider only offering a monthly billing cycle. Anyone else have this problem?

sir--I am sure it is just me but I don't have a clue what you are talking about.

I have had several year round customers cancel in the winter when I am supposed to be making my money back from them.
how are you supposed to be making money "back from them"?


and what's up with this:

Everything is fine during the mowing season when you see them regularly but, when the off season rolls around they call up and cancel and you lose money.
can you further explain?

GEO :)

scottt
02-03-2005, 07:14 PM
I agree with SprinklerGuy. In our contracts it states that if the customer cancels we will either give them a refund or they will owe us money, depending on how much work we performed prior to the cancellation date. This makes it fair for everyone involved. Your customers are being smart in cancelling before the year is over. Try to contact the customers who cancelled and explain you already performed work you're not being payed for. You can't force them to pay if it's not in the contract, but you may get lucky.

DennisF
02-03-2005, 07:15 PM
That's why I charge by the cut and not by the month. If the price is $25 per cut and they get 4 cuts per month then the monthly bill is $100. If there is a 5th cut during the month the bill is $125. In the winter if no service is received no bill is mailed. Simple and straight forward billing. They only pay for the service they receive, and I get paid for the work performed.
I know some LCO's like the steady flow of revenue by billing the entire year, but it's too easy for a scumbag customer to quit and leave you with a loss. You can try taking them to court, but the cost of trying to collect is usually not worth the trouble.

lawnman_scott
02-03-2005, 07:19 PM
I think he means he did all the work in the hard hot cut every week months, now in the easy months people dont want to pay and he is thinking of just charging every month for what he does that month. I would do it that way, but I cut every 2 weeks even in winter, so I dont have too many problems with it.

Wolfie's L&L
02-03-2005, 07:36 PM
Cutting grass in the winter months must be popular for you guys, I never see anyone around here cutting in December, January or February :p
How many of you guys get complaints from customers about you "cutting when it doesn't need to be"? Seems kind of strange to me...


Jason

021462
02-03-2005, 07:49 PM
geogunn,
lawnman_scott has it right. Let me try to explain........in the summer I will cut a yard on average 4 times a month. I base the year round contract on 40 cuts per year. If I charge $40.00 per cut at 4 cuts a month that comes to $160.00. On a year round contract I take $40.00 X 40 cuts which comes to $1600.00 per year divided by 12 months equals $133.00 per month. So, on a average month during the peak mowing season I am losing $27.00 per month. During the winter I get that money back. Does this explain my siuation?

Randy Scott
02-03-2005, 07:51 PM
Learn to budget your money and get paid for the work when it's completed. Are you charging finance charges for carrying their balance for a year? That money they owe you could be in a savings or IRA or wherever, but it should be in your hands. We have monthly contracts for mowing and we get money a month in advance and the final payment is received about a week after the final mow. No way I am letting them hold my money any longer. I'm not a loan institution. Steady cash flow is nice, but not when it costs you money. It's hard enough to make profit in this business and then to have that eaten up by poor contracts or free financing to people.

ProSvcs
02-03-2005, 08:07 PM
012462,

I will be offering a 12 month bill cycle this year, but only for full service customers. I will include mulching, pruning, Spring / fall cleanup, and Snow / Ice management.

I will collect 50% upon contract signing for Mulch / Salt (This will pay for material).

The contract reads

• A 30-day written notice of cancellation is required by Pro Services. If this notice is not received, the client is obligated to pay for services through the end of the billing cycle in addition to any other charges that may apply. You have elected Pro Services annual agreement which reduces the monthly payments for all services. This also spreads the payments over the winter months when not much work can be performed. Upon cancellation, all fees and services performed to date will be tallied up. A 10% early termination fee will be applied to the balance owed at time of cancellation. All fees are due within 5 business days of cancellation. Any collection costs including attorney fees and court cost will be the responsibility of the client.

If anyone can see any holes in this, please let me know.

Jim

dishboy
02-03-2005, 08:17 PM
geogunn,
lawnman_scott has it right. Let me try to explain........in the summer I will cut a yard on average 4 times a month. I base the year round contract on 40 cuts per year. If I charge $40.00 per cut at 4 cuts a month that comes to $160.00. On a year round contract I take $40.00 X 40 cuts which comes to $1600.00 per year divided by 12 months equals $133.00 per month. So, on a average month during the peak mowing season I am losing $27.00 per month. During the winter I get that money back. Does this explain my siuation?

This sounds like you fulfilled your end of the contract, send them a bill for the balance for the remainder of the cuttings. Just because you bill for 40 cuttings over 12 months, and now they want to cancel, does not mean they are relieved of paying you for work already completed.

Woody82986
02-03-2005, 08:29 PM
Cancelling service on a year round contract after the services have been completed only means you won't be mowing for them next season. They aren't relieved of their obligation to pay you for the remaider of the contract. Maybe I missed it in earlier posts, but you did have them sign a contract for the 12 month billing didn't you?

o-so-n-so
02-03-2005, 08:37 PM
Change your contract start dates (12 equal payment plan) to October. If a customer wants service in May...bill them monthly for services performed through the summer months...then if you want to go to a 12 equal payment plan.. then sign and start that in Oct....I bet they wont cancel knowing they have paid you in advance for work to be performed.

KINGjosh
02-03-2005, 09:33 PM
Do you explain to them that it all averages out, and that you wont be coming as often in the winter?
Sometimes I will just go to the account and find something to do if they start complaining

Tharrell
02-03-2005, 09:47 PM
I hate that yearly thing and I'll tell you why. I have experience with it in another business and several customers would cancel no matter how much you educate them. We had a fly control system as an add on to our pest elimination program. Most customers south of Virginia were billed 12 months for 7 months of service. I don't care how much you educate them, they're either stupid or just plain cheap. Getting your money spread over 12 months is like letting the IRS keep your money until tax time. For some people, that's the only type of savings they have and they have no discipline to keep their head above water without it. Sorry if I stepped on any toes. I forgot to mention this, Do you really have a contract or is it a "service agreement" A contract involves lawyers and witnesses and notories. If you get a pest control company or ANY service company to come out on a regularly scheduled basis, you most likely have a service agreement. Most companies don't follow through with penalties if an individual cancels service because they know it's not worth persuing. It CAN be persued but most companies move on and get other business to replace lost revenue. A lot of people won't sign because they THINK it's a contract.

Mark McC
02-03-2005, 09:53 PM
I know some LCO's like the steady flow of revenue by billing the entire year, but it's too easy for a scumbag customer to quit and leave you with a loss. You can try taking them to court, but the cost of trying to collect is usually not worth the trouble.

A lot of operators seem to do fine with a 12-month payment schedule, but I'm with Dennis on this. There's no way I'm letting some shyster slip out of town in December and wage a war of attrition from 2,500 miles away.

Lawnworks
02-03-2005, 10:37 PM
I am debating whether to try to sell the monthly payment option or to just bill for the work performed. Many people to do not want to agree to the 12 month plan. Some people are just plain stupid!! It doesn't matter how many times I expalin it they don't get it. Now I am going to mail them or have something ready when I give the estimate to explain to them in black and white so their dumbasses will understand. Oh and forget the whole "take them to court" crap. I sure as hell don't have time to mess with that unless is it for several thousand dollars. Maybe just get your lawyer to write you up a generic "give me my damn money letter" and send that to them to scare them. What do yall think bill monthly or per cut?

clay duncan
02-03-2005, 11:42 PM
actually a 12 month contract is the same for you and your customer. the advantage is they dont have to pay as much per month and you get a check year round. i only do this with commercial and townhouses (hoa). dont think of it as XXX per month. you have to explain to them that you will do the service for XXX per YEAR / 12 months = xxx. sometimes even the most educated people have a hard time understanding this but it is up to you to explain. several have mentioned about wanting thier money when the service is done. one thing to consider is what happens when there is a drought or you cant mow because of excessive rain. with the 12 month pay plan you still get paid. again make sure your customer understands that he is making payments on a already agreed upon price. from my experiance hoa's are already strapped and are more than eager to do the 12 month thing. i would write in the agreement april 1- march 31. hope this helps.

geogunn
02-03-2005, 11:55 PM
geogunn,
lawnman_scott has it right. Let me try to explain.....................So, on a average month during the peak mowing season I am losing $27.00 per month. During the winter I get that money back. Does this explain my siuation?

yes, I understand now. thanks.

I believe you are on the right track in re-thinking things.

let us know what you do.

GEO :)

JimLewis
02-04-2005, 02:52 AM
Holder's,

Okay, here is your problem - you are trying to make money during the winter for work you did during the summer. Or in other words, you are hoping the payments you are getting during the winter (which are a little high for the amount of work you're doing) will make up for the payments you got during the summer (which were a little low for the amount of work you were doing.)

DON'T DO IT THAT WAY! That's the secret.

When I started taking on year-round accounts, I made the year-round price the price I wanted to make during the summer. Then, the payments I got during the winter (when work decreases) is just bonus!

So for instance, back when I used to take on seasonal accounts, I would charge, say, $125.00 per month for the 8 months or so of mowing season. Then, I'd make $0 from those accounts for the 4 months during the winter. That was in the beginning, when I didn't know any better. Then, I started giving people options. They could pay me $125.00 per month for our year-round service OR pay me $140.00 per month for our seasonal service. THEN, as our company grew even bigger, I just cut out the seasonal service option alltogether and just told people we charged $125.00 per month year-round. That was the only service we offered. So then I am still making what I want to make during the summer. And we're even MORE profitable during the winter months. And if someone cancel's it's no big loss. I wasn't trying to make back money from the summer anyway. It was just bonus.

lawnman_scott
02-04-2005, 03:00 AM
Cutting grass in the winter months must be popular for you guys, I never see anyone around here cutting in December, January or February :p
How many of you guys get complaints from customers about you "cutting when it doesn't need to be"? Seems kind of strange to me...


Jason
Down here it needs it year round. Not quite as much as summer, but it still grows a bit. Plus hedges to trim and that sort of thing.

JimLewis
02-04-2005, 04:42 AM
Cutting grass in the winter months must be popular for you guys, I never see anyone around here cutting in December, January or February :p
How many of you guys get complaints from customers about you "cutting when it doesn't need to be"? Seems kind of strange to me...

Jason

We don't really "cut the grass" too often during the winter. But we do find other things to do that are of value to our customers. Our customers generally understand the concept that we don't like to starve in the winter. They understand that if an LCO is to survive year-to-year then they need a source of income all year. And they don't mind paying year-round, as long as they feel they are getting SOMETHING for their money.

So here is a short list of services we provide during winter months that don't involve cutting the grass;

* Winter Pruning of shrubs and hedges
* Limestone applications - once in Nov. and again in Feb.
* Moss Killer applications
* Check / Treat for European Crane Fly
* Winter fertilizer applications every 8-10 weeks
* other general clean-up as needed; leaves, weeds, etc.

With all of these things to do, we keep them happy. And it keeps money coming in for us all year.

Envy Lawn Service
02-04-2005, 05:00 AM
geogunn,
lawnman_scott has it right. Let me try to explain........in the summer I will cut a yard on average 4 times a month. I base the year round contract on 40 cuts per year. If I charge $40.00 per cut at 4 cuts a month that comes to $160.00. On a year round contract I take $40.00 X 40 cuts which comes to $1600.00 per year divided by 12 months equals $133.00 per month. So, on a average month during the peak mowing season I am losing $27.00 per month. During the winter I get that money back. Does this explain my siuation?

No Jim, take a second read.....



021462,

You have already performed the work. So there is nothing for them to cancel out except the remaining balance. They still owe you. Go get your money, period.

I currently have one that is trying to stiff me for my winter payments as well. Once in a blue moon you run into this. Some people are just dumb, some honestly forget in the winter, some have selective memory, and some are trying to cheat you on purpose.

It's called theft of service, don't be cheated out of your money, else you are out of your money and they pull this on the next LCO in line.

JimLewis
02-04-2005, 05:05 AM
I understand the situation. I am just suggesting that getting yourself into that predicament is a bad idea to begin with.

The way we do it, we aren't losing anything during the summer. And the winter is just bonus. So if they cancel in the winter, no big deal.

I was just saying consider changing your service model. Find something to do all-year and charge them a profitable price every month of the year. It's not smart to have customers paying you back in the winter, for work you did during the summer. Better to have them paying you in the winter for work you're doing during the winter. Then you are never in this kind of predicament.

Envy Lawn Service
02-04-2005, 05:40 AM
Ok Jim, I see what you are saying. But lets look at this from a secondary point of view.

There is a commercial property, it's a $50 cut, and the property manager requests 12 equal monthly payments. So you write a contract for 36 cuts @ $50 each. $1,800 for the season. 12 pay of $150 per month.

Now in effect, they are paying for 3 cuts per month. The other way they pay $200-250 per month depending on rather or not the month is a 5 week month.

Anyways, say you sign them in April, collect the 1st month and continue advance billing as I do.... then after making 8 payments total, which carries them into dormancy and you have covered all the needs.... then they try to call and cancel.... stiffing you $600 for work already performed.

I dunno about you, but I'm getting my money.

Now, are you suggesting that a guy should have quoted at $200 per month, ending up with $1,600 of the $1,800 for the season and all is forgotten?

laborador
02-04-2005, 11:01 AM
You should try this strategy. Just do the yearly agreements Starting in October and ending in January. Because if you do these agreements in the start of the cutting season and through out you stand a chance of getting screwed. If you do the agreement Oct through January then if the customer cancel on you, then they lose out and not you when it comes to the money.

1grnlwn
02-04-2005, 11:31 AM
I see so many comments that the customer is stupid. Jim Lewis's May be! But if the customer has your money "who is stupid"? I charge by the month. I get paid for the work I do, Period. No guessing how many cuts, no getting paid when there is drought, etc. But neither I or my customer feels bad about services not paid for or paid for and not done. I won't sit here and tell you I always get paid, because I don't. My last bills went out on Dec. 20 and I still have 2 customers that owe me a ballance. One has seen the last of my services (2nd richest customer). It is fairly common for the payments to lag when services have ceased. A lot of people hate to mow/fert. Don't think because of that they love sending you $125 + every month. That is a lot of scratch, well it is for me. The main reason commercial acounts have vendors quote a yearly price or 12 month payment, is to force competitive bids in there favor. ie. Two vendors quote the same visit price but one figures 2 less visits. He gets the job and the bank starts calling that the grass is too long or there are to many clippings. Shabang the bid winner ends up mowing the property 3 more times than quoted. Stupid customer! Or he sticks to his plan, loses the job next year and gets a bad reputation. I don't live like a king and I have a lot of money saved from last year. If I didn't have a new tool dependancy problem I would have even more. I follow 1 rule, If you don't have it don't spend it, Always pay off the whole credit card every month(see rule 1 ). Just some thoughts.

Mark

mowerman111
02-04-2005, 11:45 AM
This is a copy of our contract. Here in our area we dont calculate how many mowings we explain to the customer that we are going to spend more time in the summer by mowing and trimming bushes, weed control etc. so it works out in their favor in the summer and in ours in winter, but this wont work for you guys where theres snow on the ground all winter.



MEL'S LAWN SERVICE, INC.
1098 LA QUINTA ST. LAS CRUCES, NM 88007
(505) 523-0651
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE PROPOSAL AND AGREEMENT

Rose Minks
4690 Del Rose Ct.
Las Cruces, NM 88005

PROJECT: Maintain lawn and grounds in accordance with the following specifications:

SCOPE OF WORK:
1. Mow and trim lawn areas for a neat appearance.
2. Fertilize lawn and all other plantings as needed. (fertilizer will be an extra charge)
3. Control weeds in rock areas by pulling and or spraying.
4. Prune, trim and shape shrubs to maintain a good balanced structure and aid growth.
5. Inspect lawn and bushes for fungi and insects. (chemicals will be an extra charge)
6. Prune trees to keep branches above head height as needed. Major tree pruning will be billed as
an extra charge.
7. Tree leaves will be picked during the fall season.
8. Leaves and debris to be blown out from underneath the shrubs.
9. Pick up trash as necessary.
10. Maintain sprinkler system valves and heads by adjustment only. Replacement parts and underground repairs will be billed as an extra.

FREQUENCY OF SERVICE: Weekly 1st week in March through last week in October.Bi-monthly November through February.

CHANGE ORDERS: Any request for extra work which results in extra cost in either materials or labor to the contractor will only be executed upon written order signed by both the customer and the contractor. Labor will be billed at $50.00 per man-hour.

WORKMANSHIP: All work to be performed in a professional and workmanlike manner in accordance with standard and accepted trade practices.

DURATION OF CONTRACT: Contract shall be reveiwed at the end of each year and may be canceled by either party upon thirty days written notification. Winter season is not an acceptable reason for cancellation of this contract.

CONTRACT CHANGES: The terms of this contract may be changed only by means of a written agreement signed by both parties and attached to this contract.

tiedeman
02-04-2005, 12:24 PM
I have it in the my contract that if they get out of the flat monthly rate they first have to pay the fee for that month that they got out of, and then they second pay a cancelation fee of $150.00.

JimLewis
02-04-2005, 12:57 PM
Ok Jim, I see what you are saying. But lets look at this from a secondary point of view.

There is a commercial property, it's a $50 cut, and the property manager requests 12 equal monthly payments. So you write a contract for 36 cuts @ $50 each. $1,800 for the season. 12 pay of $150 per month.

.....SNIP.......

Now, are you suggesting that a guy should have quoted at $200 per month, ending up with $1,600 of the $1,800 for the season and all is forgotten?

No, I am suggesting that as a business owner, YOU take control. If these kind of equal 12 month payments aren't working out, I wouldn't continue to use them. When the property manager requested 12 monthly payments I would take control right there and say, "Yah! Our maintenance package DOES have equal monthly payments. Here's how it works...." And then you go over your service schedule. Explaining that during the busy season you mow every week, etc. and during the winter you do the following services.. x.x.x.x. every week or every two weeks, whatever....

Listen, I get this all the time when I am giving a bid. But you gotta take some posture and realize that you hold more cards than you think you do. Sure, you won't land quite as many bids when you call all the shots like this. But you'll be surprised to find out that many people WILL still take your bid - on YOUR terms. And then you'll be much happier with the clients you end up with.

There are many people in my area who don't want to pay $125 or $150 or even $195 (like a few of my clients do) per month during the winter. They see it as a waste of money. Hey! No problem! Guess what? Those people aren't my clients! They chose some other LCO whose terms they liked. But I still got another 160+ clients who DO like my terms and who DID agree to them. And so now all of the money we make - year round - is for work we did THAT month. Nobody is ever "paying me back" for summer work I did. I am never putting my company at risk.

I know some of you guys here on Lawnsite live in areas where it's frozen or snowy all winter. It's harder in those areas. But if you don't live in such a place, there's no excuse for not having a good year-round maintenance program. You're missing the boat if you think you're destined to ONLY work in the summer. There actually ARE people out there who will pay you to do work all year. I've found a lot of them.

brucec32
02-04-2005, 01:23 PM
I drove back up to Atlanta this week to conduct some business. It was cold and wet. I saw several crews out doing "make work" to stay busy and collect they pay over the winter.

In the parking lot of one place, I see a crew of guys pull up in a big truck with mowers on it, one hops out, grinning, with a bucket while the others stay warm in the truck cab. He does a loop of the parking lot, ostensibly to pick up trash. Loop done in 2 minutes, he gets back in, they drive off. Somebody paid for that "service". The Bermuda lawn at that property probably had been dormant for at least 3 months. The place looked clean as a whistle when they arrived. Just nothing to do there.

Another place, a home, a crew pulls up, walks around the lawn for 5 minutes with blowers, blowing at the almost non-existant leaves (already gone a month ago), then hops in the vehicle and heads off.


The first was a bank. They will pay their bill. They need someone to check on the property and do anything it needs over the winter. The second was a home. They will be less likely to enjoy the idea of paying hundreds of dollars for weekly visits over about a 10-12 week period when nothing is happening in the yard

There are things to do in the winter like cleanup jobs, shrubs, etc, that can be a great thing to postpone till then to stay busy. But, human nature being what it is, you will always find more conflict with customers and more cancellations if you bill them the same in February as you do in May. They are perceiving higher value for their money when the grass is tall, the shrubs are growing, the weeds are there, and the weather is hot, than when you are simply showing up to blow 23 small leaves off the lawn as a make-work gesture. You have to sell them the idea that the 12 payments are the finance end of the deal, but the bulk of the work was done in the hotter months. Not always easy to do.

Billing year round and insisting on year-round service probably makes you more money. But you will always have to deal with the fact that you are doing because of YOUR needs, not for the customers, and that some of them will realize this and dump you to save money, or just out of annoyance at the idea of it. And you will always have to stay geared up in "work mode" year round. I know I would have been too burned out after all these years if I worked year round. Especially with employees.....you need to get away from it for as long as possible.

I found that people are happy paying a little more when you are doing legitimate work there mowing, and then paying as needed for extra work in the winter (leaves, cleanups, gutters, etc) if you show them how they are not paying for wasted visits in other times of the year. The downside of this is you have employees you want to give year-round work to to keep them happy. I spoke with a person the other day who just mentioned that "I hate those contracts and paying for them to come out all year" .

To solve the payroll problem, be creative.....try paying employees more while they are working, so that they make nearly as much in 9-10 months as in 12 at lower wages, or provide more overtime pay so they earn heavy in the warm months. Combine this with heavier charges to customers in the warm months. Then give them both 2 months off or whatever in the Winter. Some workers welcome the free time to either goof off or go take on a winter job and make more. An electrician my brother worked with would work 9 months in Atlanta, then go rake in cash in the winter on a fishing boat up North.

All of this involves selling the people involved on the benefits of it. Put the numbers comparison on a sheet of paper and give it to them.

skurkp
06-20-2005, 02:58 PM
I push rye grass for the winter months and then I get to mow.

Pro-Scapes
06-20-2005, 05:56 PM
Holder's,

Okay, here is your problem - you are trying to make money during the winter for work you did during the summer. Or in other words, you are hoping the payments you are getting during the winter (which are a little high for the amount of work you're doing) will make up for the payments you got during the summer (which were a little low for the amount of work you were doing.)

DON'T DO IT THAT WAY! That's the secret.

When I started taking on year-round accounts, I made the year-round price the price I wanted to make during the summer. Then, the payments I got during the winter (when work decreases) is just bonus!

So for instance, back when I used to take on seasonal accounts, I would charge, say, $125.00 per month for the 8 months or so of mowing season. Then, I'd make $0 from those accounts for the 4 months during the winter. That was in the beginning, when I didn't know any better. Then, I started giving people options. They could pay me $125.00 per month for our year-round service OR pay me $140.00 per month for our seasonal service. THEN, as our company grew even bigger, I just cut out the seasonal service option alltogether and just told people we charged $125.00 per month year-round. That was the only service we offered. So then I am still making what I want to make during the summer. And we're even MORE profitable during the winter months. And if someone cancel's it's no big loss. I wasn't trying to make back money from the summer anyway. It was just bonus.

Thats great right there Jim. I wish I could get away with that but it wouldnt be tolerated well by my customers with no trees to clean up leaves or dormant grass in the winter.

I bill as work is completed. Some get invoiced montly some we pick up a check at time of service. Some we dont see for a week or 2 but then when we see em they always pay(older people mostly) Invoicing is for property management companies and commercial accts. They get net 14 terms and so far no problems billing them monthly. I do some yards all winter long and clean up alot of leaves but its all done per visit pricing no 12 month pricing going on. They would freak paying me 200 a month in the winter for 1 visit to suck thier leaves up

jbell113
06-20-2005, 06:06 PM
Almost done for the day on my way to the last property and a lady pulls up beside me at a red light and all I heard was your trailer gate is down. I tell my helper to jump out and put it up ....he comes back and says its gone. We turn around and about 2 miles back off in the grass is the gate to my trailer. Apparently my helper forgot to put it up and it dragged the road for about 1/2 mile before it slid off the hinges. We never heard it dragging.....my 36" exmark was within inches of falling off the trailer when the woman stopped and told us. The gate was ok not warped or anything and we both learned a lesson that didnt cost me anything and luckily no one was hurt.

jbell113
06-20-2005, 06:09 PM
sorry that last reply was intended to be a new thread.

brucec32
06-23-2005, 12:57 PM
Aren't employees just so much fun? LOL

justanotherlawnguy
06-26-2005, 01:28 AM
If they sign up in the off season, they get the monthly rate. If they sign up now, during the serious growth season they get charged per cut. Then once the growing season is over, usually Oct they will get switched to monthly. When the pay the first monthly bill in Oct and dont complain, you know you have a good customer going into the following season.

Thats the best way to weed out crappy customers and make it work financially! At least for my business thats how it works......