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sodgod
03-01-2005, 09:07 AM
I am loking to get a F-150 pretty soon. i am looking for a "97" "98" XLT. I was wondering how much it can pull and hold in back? Can i beef up the rear suspention?

Mark McC
03-01-2005, 09:14 AM
I am loking to get a F-150 pretty soon. i am looking for a "97" "98" XLT. I was wondering how much it can pull and hold in back? Can i beef up the rear suspention?

I have loaded two yards of double-shredded hardwood mulch in the back of my ancient F-150 beast, and my understanding is that each yard weighs in at something like 700 lbs. The last time I did that, though, I was pulling only a little 4-foot trailer.

Beefing up the suspension is a topic I've approached, but it seems that an awful lot of the truck is built with that load in mind. Bearings, brakes and so on are all upgraded in trucks with heavier payload capacities, so there's the risk of burning things out if you beef up the suspension to pull heavier payloads than the original capacity of the truck. I've decided against it.

Jpocket
03-01-2005, 09:33 AM
Get an F-250 a few years older especially if this will be the main truck. 1/2 's are not made for every day commercial use it's okay for a parttimer or weekend warrior.

Precision
03-01-2005, 09:36 AM
If you can find a 250 it will be worthe the extra couple of hundred.

beefier springs, beefier brakes, better steering, thicker stiffer frame, usually has an oil cooler and transmission cooler (if automatic) usually have front and rear stabilizers.

the money you would spend upgrading an old F150 would be much better spent just getting a similar F250 and it would probably end up being cheaper

Mark McC
03-01-2005, 09:37 AM
1/2 's are not made for every day commercial use it's okay for a parttimer or weekend warrior.

I disagree. The F-150 is probably the most widely-used truck for commercial use. I haven't looked it up, but I'm very comfortable with that assertion. The question is whether one is using it within the limitations of the vehicle.

On the other hand, if he can afford a truck with more payload capacity, he should. I'd like to, but it just aint in the budget right now.

Jpocket
03-01-2005, 09:57 AM
The only place an f-150 has commercially is for fert. rigs, sales vehicals, and back ups for when the real trucks break down other than that it is kinda silly to buy one as your main truck unless you pull a 12' footer or less

LawnBoy89
03-01-2005, 10:12 AM
I (my dad) have a 97' F-150 XLT ext. cab and you can bottom it out without too much weight but it will still pull it good. The only thing I don't like about this truck are the brakes, they don't stop too good. We once got a pallet of bricks in the back that bottomed it out completely, it still accelerated fine, stoping wasn't that bad but every bump you can feel the stress on the truck. It's a good truck though.

lwcmattlifter
03-01-2005, 10:23 AM
How much are you planning to tow/haul. A F-150 has a 6600 lb towing capacity. I believe a gas F-250 has a 10,000 tow capacity. The diesel can tow a little more. Remember the general rule of thumb is not to tow more than 80% of a vehicles max tow capacity. Going on the 80% rule the f-150 can tow 5280. As for bed capacity, subtract the gross vehicle weight from curb weight and that is how much the truck can haul.

Richard Martin
03-01-2005, 11:18 AM
Interesting responses but a lot of the "factual" ones are anything but.

Ford's F-150 payload and tow ratings depend on the engine, auto or manual tranny and rear axle ratio. The rest of the truck from bearings to brakes to transmissions are the same.

For example my 1995 F-150 is equiped with a 5.0 engine, auto transmission and a 3.08 rear axle ratio. My Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) is 9,000 pounds. That is the weight of the truck, trailer, anything in the bed of the truck and trailer, fuel and passengers. In other words my entire weight.

Now you take my buddy's F-150 that is almost identical to mine with the exception being that he has a manual transmission. His GCWR is only 6450 pounds. That is a big difference.

You really need to get the truck scaled, look up the truck in the owners manual and subtract the weight of the truck from the GCWR to find out how much weight the trailer can weigh.

Making sure that you do not exceed the limits as set forth by Ford is extremely important. If you are involved in a serious or deadly accident you could be found at fault even if you didn't start the accident. I have seen the police actually haul wrecked trucks and trailers to scales to verify that they were within manufacturers limits.

chefdrp
03-01-2005, 01:33 PM
My 95 F150 hauls 2.5 yards of mulch easy. And pulls my trailer that carries my 737 and my new lesco W/B plus the extras. (Sulky and what not) I have the 5.8 351

LawnBoy89
03-01-2005, 02:22 PM
I never knew they made a 5.8 F-150, now the biggest they make is 5.4. I hear the 5.4 is alot more powerful then the 4.6 and just as good on gas mileage (I researched this when I was looking for a new truck) so you should look around for a 5.4 if anything. My dad's has the 4.6 but it still goes pretty good.

lwcmattlifter
03-01-2005, 03:30 PM
1995 or 96' was the last year for the 5.8 in 1/2 ton trucks. The 5.8 went out with the older squared off body style. 5.8's also went in some broncos.

Pecker
03-01-2005, 04:30 PM
I never knew they made a 5.8 F-150, now the biggest they make is 5.4. I hear the 5.4 is alot more powerful then the 4.6 and just as good on gas mileage (I researched this when I was looking for a new truck) so you should look around for a 5.4 if anything. My dad's has the 4.6 but it still goes pretty good.

Mine is a 4.6 F-150 with the high geared rear end. The gas mileage on the window sticker said 15-17 mpg (in-town vs. highway). The 5.4 with the low geared rear end said 13-15 mpg. Not much difference. If I had known I'd be using my F-150 for towing a trailer, I'd have opted for the 5.4 because I think that although the 4.6 would get better mpg while not towing, bigger engine would be much better on gas mileage while towing.

Precision
03-01-2005, 06:17 PM
The 5.8 was the 351 engine that dates back to the 60's. 2 valve per cylinder and all that. Some were even big block 351 FE engines. Those are bullet proof.

The new engines are the modular engines. Totally different breed. The 5.4 is much more fuel efficient, has better HP and torque numbers than the old ones. Supposedly are a real great engine. I have no experience with them.

I am looking to buy a new truck cause an employee wrecked mine. Here are the current (2005) numbers.

F-150
4.2 V6 hp 202 torque 260 lb ft auto 4x2 3.55 gears 5600 max trailer wgt
4.6 V8 hp 231 torque 293 lb ft auto 4x2 3.55 gears 7000 max trailer wgt
5.4 V8 hp 300 torque 365 lb ft auto 4x2 3.55 gears 8400 max weight trailer
manual transmission is only available with the 4.2L engine with 3700 max trailer wgt

F250
5.4 V8 hp 300 torque 365 lb ft auto 4x2 3.73 gears 10,000 max trailer wgt
6.8 V8 hp 362 torque 457 lb ft auto 4x2 4.10 gears 12,500 max trailer wgt
6.0D V8 hp ? torque 570 lb ft auto 4x2 3.73 gears 12,500 max weight trailer

So for comparison sake the 5.4 with the same rear end in a F-250 will haul 1600# more than in a F-150. This obviously has nothing to do with the engine or gears it has to do with the ability of the vehicle to remain stable and brake those loads.

This would apply to any year truck. The numbers would be different but the proportionality would be the same.

Hope this helps.

rdran5
03-01-2005, 06:56 PM
the 6.8 is a V10, My wifes 2000 Excursion 5.4 is only 255 Horsepower, I see the 2005 is 300 Horse power, quite a change in the same engine.

LB1234
03-01-2005, 07:01 PM
1/2 's are not made for every day commercial use it's okay for a parttimer or weekend warrior.

Couldn't disagree more.

If you will be pulling less than a 5k# trailer and never loading your pickup with more than 1k#'s why the heck would you buy a 3/4-1T truck? You'd be wasting more in gas and the cost of the truck.

You need to evaluate what your requirements are in order to decide if a 1/2T pickup will work. Also keep in mind your business plan and when/if you decide to grow if the truck will "grow into" your plan.

LB1234
03-01-2005, 07:04 PM
The only place an f-150 has commercially is for fert. rigs, sales vehicals, and back ups for when the real trucks break down other than that it is kinda silly to buy one as your main truck unless you pull a 12' footer or less


You make absolutely no sense.

It doesn't depend on the size of the trailer, but rather the weight you will be towing and what the 1/2T is rated for!

lawncare4u
03-01-2005, 07:26 PM
My 95 F150 hauls 2.5 yards of mulch easy. And pulls my trailer that carries my 737 and my new lesco W/B plus the extras. (Sulky and what not) I have the 5.8 351

I have a 5.8 351 also in a F150 ,it does a good job.....maybe someday I can step into a F 350

Richard Martin
03-01-2005, 08:35 PM
Some were even big block 351 FE engines. Those are bullet proof.

Actually it was a 352 and at over 750 pounds those things were pigs. Ford, rightfully so, dumped them back in the late 60s for the lighter weight Windsor based engines.

Smalltimer1
03-01-2005, 10:03 PM
the 6.8 is a V10, My wifes 2000 Excursion 5.4 is only 255 Horsepower, I see the 2005 is 300 Horse power, quite a change in the same engine.

The '04-present 5.4's have the 3 valve heads therefore bumping the HP up to 300 from 255.

Smalltimer1
03-01-2005, 10:12 PM
Actually it was a 352 and at over 750 pounds those things were pigs. Ford, rightfully so, dumped them back in the late 60s for the lighter weight Windsor based engines.

There was a 352 produced in 1960 that produced 360 horsepower, I believe it was in the Thunderbirds. The FE's were definite improvements over the Y-blocks they replaced. The Y-blocks were small, underpowered, and very heavy. Overall the Y-blocks were pretty reliable though.

In the trucks, the 352 was dropped in 1967 and was replaced by the 360. The 360 and 390 were produced in the trucks until 1976, when the 351M and 400 were introduced into the truck line to take their place. The 460 was introduced into the truck line in 1976 and was taken out of production in late 1979. The 351M/400 was produced until 1981/early 82 and was replaced with the 351W as the medium gas engine and the 460 was reintroduced as the big gas engine. The 351W didn't see the truck line until 1982. The 302 was introduced into the trucks in 1969 and never left production until 1996.

The FE family consists of the 332, 352, 360, 390, 406, 410, 427, and 428 V8's.

The 332, 352, and 360's are gutless wonders. Great low end torque, but at a cost of fuel mileage.

However, the 390 all the way up through the 428's are power houses that will pull hell off its hinges. Still not so great mileage, but great low end as well as good top end.

By the way, from 1977 through 1979, F-150's were available with 460's. They are great tow rigs especially when equipped with the C6 auto and the Camper Special package.

ztec
03-04-2005, 10:00 PM
so is the 4.6 just a destroked 5.4? I have a 4.6 in my e250 van and it really sucks. I have an 03 4.6 with 4.10 gears and it struggles when I pull my 2500-3k dump trailer empty. It is so underpowered I wish I had gotten the 5.4. The tranny sucks to its always jumping around and not knowing what gear to be in. Im kinda hoping that the tranny in it was a lemon and that it will die before my 50000 mile warranty is up (only has 21000).

xcopterdoc
03-04-2005, 10:39 PM
A 1/2 ton truck is a 1/2 ton truck is a 1/2 ton truck. So... just load it up til the springs bottom out, the clutch slips and the tranny over heats, the rear fails and the tires wear out at 5 times their normal rate, the front end will fail or wear out too. Then when ya bring it to a shop cuz it drives, sounds, pulls, vibrates and wont stop... Dont gripe... write the big check and go on.
PS... as a tech.. I didnt make money on major repairs of abused vehicles, the real money was/is made on maintaining a well maintained and driven vehicle. I made my money easily, the driver had a well maintained vehicle and it was a win/win for both of us.

Richard Martin
03-05-2005, 01:36 AM
so is the 4.6 just a destroked 5.4?

Yes and no. The 5.4 uses a longer stroke but the crank from a 5.4 can't be put into a 4.6 block to make a 5.4. The stroke of the 5.4 is so long that the pistons would fall out of the bores when they travel down or would hit the heads when they travel up. The 5.4 uses a much taller deck height.