View Single Post
  #30  
Old 12-10-2012, 10:39 PM
bcg bcg is online now
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Tx
Posts: 1,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1idejim
No, i am not saying that. Your reading might be right on for the wire/voltage drop/resistance/temp/inrush holding requirements of the system. You use RB valves and 16/18 ga wire?
I'm almost entirely maintenance and repair, installed 5 systems in the last 3 years, so it's whatever is there. Typically it's either RB DV100 or Hunter SRV valves and 18 ga wire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1idejim View Post
As the heat goes up, the resistance goes down.
Right, got that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1idejim
5-6 volt amps, depends on the solenoid specs.

I have a pro-93 LCM and it reads good, i have an excel clamp that i have to wrap the wires. Before i blew my FLUKE 5/600 to the next world i had to wrap the forks to get an accurate measurement.

I never had any luck with a standard meter connected in series.

Hope that the above didn't confuse the question
Posted via Mobile Device
No, that helps. So my Fluke is reading correctly.

BTW, I prefer the Greenlee DM20 but killed my last 2. I've got a couple on order with my distributor but for some reason they aren't here yet. The Flukes are great but I do have a few issues with them for the kind of use I have.

1 - They don't like to measure resistance when there's current on the wire (i.e. POOF). The Greenlee will just beep at you and you can carry on with your day.

2 - They really aren't rugged enough for this kind of work. As much as they cost, I feel terrible getting them muddy and know they can't handle being wet.

3 - I prefer a manual ranging resistance setting. I can get it with the Fluke but there are too many steps involved. On the Greenlee, I set it to 200 Ohms and get on with it.

I don't really care for the little lead clamps, sure its a hassle sometimes but I prefer to just touch the leads to what I'm testing.
Reply With Quote
 
Page generated in 0.03595 seconds with 7 queries