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Old 02-11-2013, 10:24 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
1) It was conducted on creeping bentgrass maintained at 5 mm height. Not really relevant to lawn care.
Are you suggesting that similar results may not be seen on turf maintained at a different height? Do you have some data to support that conclusion?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
2) They fertilized at about 3X the amount of N commonly used for bentgrass putting greens. It's common sense that if you overfertilizer with N, you're going to get a lot of Pythium activity in your control plots. They obviously tried to stack the deck in their favor and didn't want to test against common conditions
This is all you have .... accusing the researchers of fixing the experiment? WOW!

At the max rate of applied N, that amounts to 4.6 lbs/1000 sqft of nitrogen..... and that is 3x the nitrogen rate? Amusing ... just who is stacking what here?

Ignoring the fact the N rates on greens is highly variable, where did you come up with this 3x the "commonly used" rate number? How much N was commonly used on bentgrass greens in the late 80's and early 90's? Certainly you have some data to support this? It is also "common sense" that high nitrogen leads to lush growth which is more susceptible to Pythium. Was that the case here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
3) The conventional product they tested against was applied at 10% of the lowest rate on the product label. If you don't apply the product according to the directions, you're not going to get any control
What conventional product specifically are you talking about? Further, what does this have to do with the compost tested?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
4) The authors reached a different conclusion than you proposed. Their conclusion sounds a lot like what I've said:

"We conclude, therefore, that the suppression of Pythium
diseases of creeping bentgrass with compost amendments is
dependent on the microbial properties of the amendment and
the soil microbial responses following application...."
I didn't "propose" anything, and it does not support what you have said. An example:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Read your own link -- adding microbes is not even a short-term solution -- it doesn't work at all! The microbes involved in OM mineralization are always present in the soil and will thrive when the conditions exist that favor turfgrass growth. Adding a few drops of microbes per square foot makes no difference at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Wrong. All I did was ask for data.
Not wrong, and I provided it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
What you have provided was data that backed up my assertions from previous threads -- bio control of diseases in lawn situations is inconsistent at best and has not been proven to be practical or as effective as conventional methods.
Really now ..... see above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
It's obvious you either haven't read the entire paper or you don't understand it. Why else would you draw conclusions opposite from those the authors of the paper wrote?
What conclusion would that be skip? Provide the quote when I drew any conclusion based on the linked article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Is that why you cite articles about creeping bentgrass putting green management (using management regimes against all current recommendations and impractical for field use) to make a point about lawn care systems?
Amusing and typical. You claimed the cited literature did not show any positive results and no field research has been conducted. I choose one of the cites to demonstrate you were wrong ..... and you are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Perhaps you should read more and pots less.
And we close with your typical immature, unprofessional behavior.
 
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