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Old 02-12-2013, 06:10 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,943
I have my ground set up with reasonably thick turf but with blank zones or barespots,,, some about the size of a tennis ball... these barespots have grass clippings covering the clay loam topsoil... not greasy clay, but it is a loam with adequate OM and sand mix to create structure...
That's the starting point...

Now if I kept the surface of the soil moist, all growing season with irrigation,,, that means I could go onto the turf at anytime and scratch away the brown clippings on the barespot and the ground would be moist... even though the grass is dry, those barespots would be holding moisture right under the grass clippings... this isn't sand so I should take a look into the root zone and see how much moisture there is in the top 3" or 4" of topsoil...

I find that when the surface is wet, there is very little air in the root zone... the structure is fairly homogenous and could easily be considered greasy as a result...(remember this: grab a handful of dirt, squeeze it into a ball, then poke it with your finger and it should bust up into crumbles)???
Well that wouldn't happen with a clay loam that doesn't really get adequate air...

Remember the article from "Clay Platelets" thread had listed the Wet/Dry cycle as being one way that structure is formed, along with freeze/thaw cycle...
For that reason alone I have no problem letting the grass soils dry for a week or so, before turning on the irrigation again... afterall, if my turf is going to "stress out" in a week then I have bigger problems...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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