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Old 07-13-2006, 03:42 PM
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G.L. In Ont G.L. In Ont is offline
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Juniper trees needing some help

Hey guys,

A question on some junipers that are looking a bit ragged. Homeowner indicates that they were trimmed quite soon after being planted and thought that might be the problem.

I thought perhaps salt damage (need to check with them if they use salt back there) or not enough depth for the roots.

Any ideas?
Thanks in advance, GL
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Old 07-13-2006, 05:14 PM
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Way too much top for the limited root zone. Once it left the nursery and the daily watering schedule, dieback must occur. If it was grown in the cedar boxes there is root mass available all over...once installed most of the lower roots will decline due to the poor oxygen levels and the possible water problem. Too bad for the client in that those Blue point Junipers will not recover. Growth only occurs from the existing live tips, not from any brown or dead zones.
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Old 07-14-2006, 09:32 AM
golfguy golfguy is offline
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I am not a tree and shrub expert. I did however have some junipers look similar to this at one time. My horticulturalist took a sheet of paper, placed it under the foliage and shook the tree. The paper was immediately covered in some little insects. I believe she called them spider mites. For all that it will cost its worth a try.
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Old 07-15-2006, 09:55 AM
upidstay's Avatar
upidstay upidstay is offline
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I am guessing that they will survive, but will never be all that attractive. Actually, they will most likely look awful for the near future. I would suggest ripping them out and replacing them. But first find out if it was in insect or disease that caused this. I worked for one idiot many years ago who took his dull, rusty hedge trimmers, poured motor oil all over the blades for a lubricant, and then trimmed away. Did an amazing amount of damage to an what once was a beautiful shrub.
Do a thorough inspection, take a cutting of some dead and live parts and send it off to your local ag. extension service. They might be able to help. You don't want the same bug/disease damaging the new stuff.
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Old 07-17-2006, 06:30 AM
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TURFLORD TURFLORD is offline
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With only the pictures to look at, I'd say spider mites. The bushes are not worth saving. The damage is done. They're butt ugly specimens anyway and not to scale.
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Old 07-19-2006, 02:26 PM
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G.L. In Ont G.L. In Ont is offline
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Guys, thanks for all the suggestions and input.

I am up in Canada so the ag. extension isn't an option. There are a couple of good nurseries around here that I could try and I know some tree experts I will also check with. I haven't dusted for spider mites yet - I will do so soon.

TURFLORD, this woman is pretty mean -- she'd definitely take offense to your butt-ugly comment!

In the meantime I have applied our Turbo SE liquid organic fertilizer 0-0-4 which is made from seaplant extract - as you guys have said I don't think anything that is brown and dead right now will come back but there is some new growth coming in from underneath that I hope I can stimulate.

Any more ideas from the other tree gurus on here?

Cheers all, GL
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Old 07-20-2006, 11:04 AM
golfguy golfguy is offline
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The ag extensions are available up here. Try the University of Guelph.
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Old 08-05-2006, 08:58 PM
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Ag extension at U of G

Hi golfguy, thanks for the tip, I didn't know that. So how does it work? Can I call them or can I email them - email might be better as I could include my pics. Have you used them before? My assumption is that they will provide some sort of consultation and/or answer questions - is that right?

Cheers, GL.
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Old 08-21-2006, 06:58 AM
Coffeecraver Coffeecraver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TURFLORD
With only the pictures to look at, I'd say spider mites. The bushes are not worth saving. The damage is done. They're butt ugly specimens anyway and not to scale.

I agree,removal is the best thing to do
They will never recover
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