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  #1  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:08 PM
shopteacher shopteacher is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lawton, Michigan
Posts: 60
Can I advertise "small engine repair" if not mechanic?

I am pretty good at figuring out problems, but have alot to learn. Can a person like me own a Lawnmower repair shop? I would assume so....But
You never know
How much could a person like me charge per hour??
I have people asking me to fix their stuff all the time.

Let me know.
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  #2  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:10 PM
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DBL DBL is offline
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first off you can advertise what ever you want but when people call they want it done right im not sure of pricing that though but our dealer charges i think $70/hour to work on our mowers
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  #3  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:12 PM
shopteacher shopteacher is offline
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Forgot to ask original question

I forgot to add my original question.
Without being a certified mechanic, are there any legal considerations while opening up a repair shop?
What does it take to become a certified mechanic anyway. I am not interested in going through a long and expensive process to do it, as I already have a teaching career.

GO TIGERS!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks
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  #4  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:16 PM
shopteacher shopteacher is offline
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Thanks DBL,
I guess I would have to guarentee my work like a dealership to get satisfied customers and return costumers.
I have seen such shoddy workmanship by dealerships that are multimillion dollar establishments, like a local Toro dealer I know of that can't fix anything.
Thanks
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  #5  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:46 PM
newz7151 newz7151 is offline
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Location: Tejas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shopteacher
I forgot to add my original question.
Without being a certified mechanic, are there any legal considerations while opening up a repair shop?
What does it take to become a certified mechanic anyway. I am not interested in going through a long and expensive process to do it, as I already have a teaching career.
Do what you will. There are industry certifications like EETC and such.

You would not be able to say you are a repair center for the particular engine/equipment lines without going through their factory required schools. I guess you could say you work on such and such brands, but would not be legally allowed to use any respective corporate trademarks/logos in any of your advertising.

If you're not going to do it "the correct way", but would still like to do it along with your teaching career, then find a local established dealership in your area and see if they are looking for a shop trainee that is interested in working part time.

To do it correctly is a "long and expensive process".
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  #6  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:59 PM
djsp24 djsp24 is offline
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Location: Scottsville NY 14546
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To do it correctly is a "long and expensive process".[/QUOTE]

Can you clarify what you mean by this? For most of the dealerships you need to log in like 20-40 hours of tech time within a year or two and cost is relatively nothing compared to what the return is...... Not disputing your comment, just curious as to why you said that??? I thought it was way easier then getting one of my ASE certifications..... maybe its because I am using that as a reference??
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  #7  
Old 10-11-2006, 11:34 AM
newz7151 newz7151 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djsp24
To do it correctly is a "long and expensive process".


Can you clarify what you mean by this? For most of the dealerships you need to log in like 20-40 hours of tech time within a year or two and cost is relatively nothing compared to what the return is...... Not disputing your comment, just curious as to why you said that??? I thought it was way easier then getting one of my ASE certifications..... maybe its because I am using that as a reference??[/QUOTE]


Well, ok, "can be". I meant opening your own place from the ground up. I guess it would depend though on how much you have in the bank to start with, and if you are retired or starting because you've been laid off and lost your retirement.

If you want to avoid headaches, don't bother with the MTD stuff (from a warranty standpoint). I'm still waiting for going on 2.5 months now for a height adjuster assy. for one of the new MTD push mowers with the MTD engine on it. The factory was FINALLY made to understand that they were sending out "left side" assemblies in the packages with the "right side" part number and description. I've had 4 mispackaged parts sent to us just on this issue.
MTD usually doesn't listen and they don't care once the machines are sold.
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  #8  
Old 10-10-2006, 09:42 PM
khouse khouse is offline
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Location: lee's summit, mo
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can you fix mowers? have you fixed them? do you have several places to buy your parts? do you have the tools? do you have a shop? if the answer is yes then go for it. all you can say is that you tried if you fail. i would suggest doing it part time first. if you get stuck on a problem them have this forum up and running at all times. if you repair a mower from advice given here and make money then please divide 50% of your net profit equally to all the people who reply and help you.
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  #9  
Old 10-10-2006, 10:41 PM
djsp24 djsp24 is offline
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Location: Scottsville NY 14546
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I own a small engine repair shop.... Do you need to be a certified small engine tech to open a shop? Not really, unless you want to do warranty work and get dealerships. I worked for 4 years in my own business and if I had something that needed to be fixed under warranty, I just told them to take it to the dealer... Next thing i knew, EVERY dealer in the area was asking if I would either come work for them or if they could dump there extra work off to me to do!! I started in my garage with a solid background in automotive repair and 12 years of fixing cars under my belt, fixing small engines was a piece of cake.... I began by charging 30/hr. after my second year in business i bumped it to 50/hr which was still 20 less then any local dealer, I went in and got dealerships for MTD, Murray, LAwnboy, Briggs and Ariens... cost anywhere from 1k to 6k for licensing and blah blah blah, but man was it worth it!! once i became an ariens and briggs dealer, I had about twice the amount of clients in 2 years OVER NIGHT! I was so booked up I hired my father, also a auto mechanic to come and work with me and we established an excellent business and were clearing over 75k a year each after everything was said and done.... If you know the basics of small engine repair, then all you need to do is keep banging out machines and you will soon know everything you need to know without taking any special classes, believe me.... they really are simple, I only ever had ONE machine i couldnt fix, and the owner just told me to keep it for parts..... I destroyed it with a 20lb sledge hammer......So no, you dont need any special certifications to open your own shop, the most important part of this business is telling the client you can take care of that and then by god you better figure it out! After 6 years in the business we grew so rapidly we took an offer from a major small engine business in our area and sold out..... made a GREAT profit and to think.... we only started out with hand tools and a couple sets of saw horses and an old snow mobile trailer...... Better be ready for the spring and winter rush when it happens, because if its anything like my business I started part time on weekends and had 60-80 lawnmowers every weekend after 1 ad in a local advertiser! Good luck with it if you decide to do it, great money maker but does get boring after awile! If you ever have a question just shoot me an email.
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  #10  
Old 10-12-2006, 04:26 PM
shopteacher shopteacher is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lawton, Michigan
Posts: 60
Thanks djsp
I had a hunch there was some money to be made. People do not and will not care for there mowers. I don't know what it is, but the simplest things cause people to assume their moweri is junk. Most people don't have anyone who will come to their house for less than a couple hundred bucks. They don't have the means to fix it or to bring it to a dealer, so they are stuck.
I wonder how a mobile repair shop would do?
Thanks for the info.
I tell my students this same stuff all the time.
Thanks again
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