Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-14-2011, 03:01 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: nc
Posts: 3,332
Adding organic matter to bermuda

Have a Bermuda lawn that isn't as thick or green as it should be. I've been treating it for the last year or two. We have aerated once a year, fertilized heavy and done a few lime applications. I'm thinking the organic matter is low. I'm gonna aerate it this week and thought about top dressing it with some peat or something.

Any ideas?
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-14-2011, 03:04 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
I have had good results applying a soluble humate concentrate with some N, K and micronutrients on thin lawns. A soil test to check pH and P levels is also a good idea. Peat and solid organic matter can form a hydrophobic layer on top of the soil, especially if it allowed to dry.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-14-2011, 06:37 PM
fl-landscapes's Avatar
fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,381
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
I have had good results applying a soluble humate concentrate with some N, K and micronutrients on thin lawns. A soil test to check pH and P levels is also a good idea. Peat and solid organic matter can form a hydrophobic layer on top of the soil, especially if it allowed to dry.



can also increase the chance of fairy ring in bermuda lawns, Be carefull the compost is fully composted, decomposing organic matter is considered a major contributor to fairy ring development.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-14-2011, 07:10 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: nc
Posts: 3,332
thanks guys. what would you add? Just topdress with sand? Its the front of a house that was built 5 or so years ago. I figured they striped a lot of topsoil off when grading and compaction is causing this. Its about 2-3k in front of the house. sides and back are pretty nice.
__________________
GrassMasters, LLC
Wilson, NC
www.grassmasterswilson.com
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-14-2011, 08:14 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
Washed sand is always good for bermuda grass, especially if the lawn needs leveling so it can be cut with the proper mower. I do not like to see rotary mowers on bermuda. Then you fertilize. I like 1 lb N per month of growing season and additional P, K, micronutrients as indicated by soil testing/tissue testing.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-14-2011, 10:16 PM
quiet quiet is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Washed sand is always good for bermuda grass, especially if the lawn needs leveling so it can be cut with the proper mower. I do not like to see rotary mowers on bermuda. Then you fertilize. I like 1 lb N per month of growing season and additional P, K, micronutrients as indicated by soil testing/tissue testing.
Yup! Too often we just pound bermuda with N and forget about the K and micros needed, and bermuda really benefits from high K apps. It will luxury feed on K, and high K apps promote disease resistance in bermuda. Try a 1-0-1 ratio fert.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-15-2011, 01:51 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
You know, I feed all lawns every 30-45 days, including centipede grass. Not once have I seen or had to deal with problems associated with too much fertilizer. 1--0-1 is what I mix for centipede, 2-0-1 is usual for bermuda, st augustine and zoysia, with adjustments in total rate for each grass. My sign that I am not keeping up or putting down enough fertilizer is the appearance of dollar spot and leaf spot. One more thing, no coated urea.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-15-2011, 10:01 AM
quiet quiet is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
My sign that I am not keeping up or putting down enough fertilizer is the appearance of dollar spot and leaf spot. One more thing, no coated urea.
My sign is helminthosporium. And I avoid any urea like the plague.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-15-2011, 08:17 PM
Turf Dawg's Avatar
Turf Dawg Turf Dawg is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Gainesville Texas
Posts: 3,649
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
You know, I feed all lawns every 30-45 days, including centipede grass. Not once have I seen or had to deal with problems associated with too much fertilizer. 1--0-1 is what I mix for centipede, 2-0-1 is usual for bermuda, st augustine and zoysia, with adjustments in total rate for each grass. My sign that I am not keeping up or putting down enough fertilizer is the appearance of dollar spot and leaf spot. One more thing, no coated urea.
Please educate me. Why no coated urea? I like the sulfur coated urea especially in SA to help keep the soil PH down. Is this a bad thing? I treat lawns on a six week schedule.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-15-2011, 09:38 PM
quiet quiet is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turf Dawg View Post
Please educate me. Why no coated urea? I like the sulfur coated urea especially in SA to help keep the soil PH down. Is this a bad thing? I treat lawns on a six week schedule.
The amount of sulfur in SCU is inconsequential. Plus that coating is easily cracked, releasing all the urea at once. In fact, I recall our LS friend Tremor remarking that typically 35-50% of the sulfur coating is cracked during transport.

If you want sulfur - and sulfur is ALWAYS beneficial in our high pH soils, use ammonium sulfate as your N source. Better color, longer lasting, and less disease pressure than urea.

I used a 50/50 mix of AS and Houactinite (biosolids) for round 3 last week.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:09 PM.

Page generated in 0.10472 seconds with 7 queries