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Old 07-22-2012, 09:01 AM
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grass disaster grass disaster is offline
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drought tolerant northern grass seed

is there such a thing?

i am re-seeding some spots in my lawn and want to switch to a better seed.


i'd even be ok with ordering it.

i probably am looking to get 10-15 lbs.
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Old 07-22-2012, 09:38 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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It always boils down to the right plant for the right environment... Just about any of the grasses that have been in existing lawns for my lifetime have seen lots of drought and flooding over the years...

These lawns have mature grasses with long roots and plenty of energy reserves, becuz they haven't been pampered with spoon feeding fertilizer, nor often watering to keep the majority of root activity at the surface...

There maybe 'clinical trials' that say this seed is better than that seed, but at the end of the day,,, it's how it is treated in it's environment... horticultural practices make the real difference in strength of survival capabilities...

Environment can nullify strong genetics or even make-up for mutated genetics, depending on how they are treated... we train our Olympic athletes with the best possible environment we can, but there maybe better athletes starving in 3rd world countries, or tripping out on booze in this one...

It is more important to get your turf to perform into a mature lawn...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 07-22-2012, 10:24 AM
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i'm looking for drought resistant seed.

i know they have corn now that is better now.
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Old 07-22-2012, 10:34 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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And just like corn,,, the top 3 choices for your area are already being sold locally... any new improvements are miniscule, until they move to gene splicing... good luck ...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:24 PM
JoJo1990 JoJo1990 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
And just like corn,,, the top 3 choices for your area are already being sold locally... any new improvements are miniscule, until they move to gene splicing... good luck ...
So lets say a customer, who has lived in the same home for 20 years, calls and says that they want their thinning lawn overseeded. Lets add that they don't irrigate but have the ability to do so during establishment. They hope to have a cool season grass blend to match their current yard that needs as few inputs as possible. You will tell them that since there are no "gene splicing" seeds available, they are out of luck?

Have you heard of NTEP?
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:42 PM
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i'm really not following what you guys are talking about.

i have mainly perennial rye and blue grass.

are you guys saying that there are no other varieties very similar to this that can with stand the heat a little better than what i currently have?
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:09 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoJo1990 View Post
So lets say a customer, who has lived in the same home for 20 years, calls and says that they want their thinning lawn overseeded. Lets add that they don't irrigate but have the ability to do so during establishment. They hope to have a cool season grass blend to match their current yard that needs as few inputs as possible. You will tell them that since there are no "gene splicing" seeds available, they are out of luck?

Have you heard of NTEP?
What one hopes to find in more drought tolerant seeds, one will find the latest and the best, time tested on the shelves at the local hardware store or feed mill or seed mill... these companies stay in business by providing the local customer with the best available , when it's available...

Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule... it is for that reason I stress the concept of cultural practices to grow a lawn into maturity, being your best bet...

I probably have heard of NTEP,,, but what do those initials stand for???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:54 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
What one hopes to find in more drought tolerant seeds, one will find the latest and the best, time tested on the shelves at the local hardware store or feed mill or seed mill... these companies stay in business by providing the local customer with the best available , when it's available...

Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule... it is for that reason I stress the concept of cultural practices to grow a lawn into maturity, being your best bet...

I probably have heard of NTEP,,, but what do those initials stand for???
Do you really think the sources you mention are selling the same seeds as they sold 5 years ago? Do you really think there have been no improvements in seeds in the last few years? Do you really think cultural methods trump genetic improvements in color, drought tolerance, insect and disease resistance?

Cultural methods not doubt play a large role in successfully managing turf grass, but they will only allow turf to reach it's genetic capacity.

NTEP.......National Turfgrass Evaluation Program http://www.ntep.org/
You should know this.
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:03 PM
JoJo1990 JoJo1990 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule...
Absolutely not true.
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  #10  
Old 07-22-2012, 04:44 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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The Texas bluegrass hybrids are a good bet.
However...overseeding...sometimes fails to get a good take--as much as 90 percent may not establish itself because of competition with the old grass, and the slow start that is typical of all bluegrasses.
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/mg/gardennotes/563.html

Scotts brand is Thermal Blue or Longhorn.

Second choice is to seed in a tall fescue--which can survive further south than Kentucky bluegrass. But only a few types will match your old grass--and you could end up with clumps of a different type of grass.

For best results--remove old grass and install tall fescue sod.
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