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Old 08-03-2012, 11:32 PM
soafone soafone is offline
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Toro Flow Gauge

I have a one inch water main in a residential home, going into a 5/8 water meter, then back out to one inch pex pipe. Right after that, if I were to install a 1/2" boiler drain (aka. sediment tap) off of the pex pipe, and I was to attach a Toro flow gauge, how accurate with the gpm reading be? Would the reading be an excellent figure to base my zones on as far as flow (gpm's) is concerned? How many gpm's could I expect it to be? I have attached a pressure gauge at the hose bib at the back of the home and it reads 55 psi.

I suspect that the Toro flow gauge would not accurately measure the gpm's since I am connecting to a 1/2" boiler drain, not directly to the one inch pipe. The hole inside it the boiler drain is pretty small and very restrictive of volume. What do you think?
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:38 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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Yeah, not very accurate. I never thought much of those Toro flow gauges either, we used them back in the early 80's.
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Old 08-04-2012, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irritation View Post
Yeah, not very accurate. I never thought much of those Toro flow gauges either, we used them back in the early 80's.
I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure."
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Old 08-04-2012, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Leary View Post
I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure."
that's because the flow gauge is really a 30 psi pressure gauge with a special scale that's keyed to the size of the outlet
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Old 08-04-2012, 11:27 AM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Leary View Post
I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure."
If you dont exceed it's ratings the gauge is accurate according to a bucket test.

Now these are very accurate. I have one and have used it many times.

http://www.pollardwater.com/pages_product/P67514LFdiffuser.asp
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Last edited by cgaengineer; 08-04-2012 at 11:34 AM.
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Old 08-04-2012, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgaengineer View Post
If you dont exceed it's ratings the gauge is accurate according to a bucket test.

Now these are very accurate. I have one and have used it many times.

http://www.pollardwater.com/pages_pr...LFdiffuser.asp
Wow! That's a no b.s. tester, except I have no fire hydrants on any of my sites.
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Old 08-04-2012, 12:05 PM
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Wow! That's a no b.s. tester, except I have no fire hydrants on any of my sites.
I did many hydrant flow tests at the company I used to work for. These tests were for fire protection and new subdivisions mostly. You haven't seen flow until you see 4000 gallons per minute coming out of a 2.5" hydrant bib at almost 200 psi. A ground shaking experience.
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Old 08-04-2012, 05:53 AM
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It is a vague generality, that in a home with a basement water meter, the flow and pressure you read at a hose bib located not too far from the meter, will be what the system will have available, on account of the losses in the pathway through the hose bib being more or less what will be lost through a PVB and an electric valve.
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:07 AM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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You will likely exceed the 15gpm the gauge reads if you installed at that location.
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by cgaengineer View Post
You will likely exceed the 15gpm the gauge reads if you installed at that location.
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Through a hose bib? 15 gpm? Not likely.
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