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  #1  
Old 08-27-2012, 10:11 PM
turfmd101 turfmd101 is offline
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Great ph info chart.

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Old 08-27-2012, 10:13 PM
turfmd101 turfmd101 is offline
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Fat area ranges good uptake. Thin area range poor uptake.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:11 AM
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rob7233 rob7233 is offline
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Yes, those are pretty nice - Nutrient availability at various pH ranges.

I've always thought it was interesting how Fe drops off so quickly as approach neutral and higher. What might be the typical pH of rainwater?
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Old 08-28-2012, 01:33 PM
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I think I remember reading the ph of rainwater is typically 5-6. In some areas lower than that. I believe this explains why you can water a lawn with an inch of groundwater and it looks nowhere as good as what an inch of rain will do.
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Old 08-28-2012, 02:02 PM
Weekend cut easymoney Weekend cut easymoney is offline
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they claim our treated water is 8.5-9.5 range...I think I understand this is not so good for growing most plants -especially as the soil is extrmely basic as well-

am I understanding this correctly?
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:30 PM
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rob7233 rob7233 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
I think I remember reading the ph of rainwater is typically 5-6. In some areas lower than that. I believe this explains why you can water a lawn with an inch of groundwater and it looks nowhere as good as what an inch of rain will do.
The reason that a lawn irrigated with rainwater looks better after verses tap or groundwater is that Nitrogen is very mobile and changes form readily from a gaseous state to being very water soluble being carried by rainwater. A good rain always contains Nitrogen(N) which is taken up by the lawn's root zone. I'm not sure how much but that's likely one reason any given lawn looks better after a good rain. Additionally, I also recall vaugely something about ion exchange with rainwater but can't remember anything else regarding that.

Also that with soil testing, N is not measured since it's so mobile.



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Old 08-29-2012, 11:07 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Originally Posted by rob7233 View Post
The reason that a lawn irrigated with rainwater looks better after verses tap or groundwater is that Nitrogen is very mobile and changes form readily from a gaseous state to being very water soluble being carried by rainwater. A good rain always contains Nitrogen(N) which is taken up by the lawn's root zone. I'm not sure how much but that's likely one reason any given lawn looks better after a good rain. Additionally, I also recall vaugely something about ion exchange with rainwater but can't remember anything else regarding that.

Also that with soil testing, N is not measured since it's so mobile.
I might disagree that N delivery via rainwater is meaningful. In fact, the studies I did years back showed N from rainwater was almost nonexistent. Rainwater may dissolve soem gaseous N2 from the atmosphere, but N2 isn't plant available. Some plant available N can be made in a reaction with lightning, but this usually adds 0.02 #N/M, so it doesn't add much.

Rainwater usually perks up lawns because most irrigated lawns use treated municipal water, which usually has a pH in the mid 8s, which haxs a liming effect each time the lawn is irrigated. Lower pH rainwater helps to bring pH in range for N forms to be more easily available.

Like you, I find soil testing for N to be unnecessary and to have little value. But, I was raked over the coals on this board for suggesting that. I wonder if anyone will rake you over the coals for doing the same?
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Old 08-28-2012, 07:43 PM
turfmd101 turfmd101 is offline
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Wonder if the range ever fluctuates in rain water. Since optimum pesticide molecule performance is reliant on a specific water ph. Could this be ill effective.
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Last edited by turfmd101; 08-28-2012 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:38 PM
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Wonder if the range ever fluctuates in rain water. Since optimum pesticide molecule performance is reliant on a specific water ph. Could this be ill effective.
Posted via Mobile Device
Now there's an idea for study and an application for a Governmental Grant!!


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Old 08-28-2012, 10:16 PM
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Wonder if the range ever fluctuates in rain water. Since optimum pesticide molecule performance is reliant on a specific water ph. Could this be ill effective.
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The proper notation is Small p with a capital H. The capital H stands for the element of Hydrogen and the small p is a math notation for inverse change.

What is pH?? It is the measurement of the acidic or alkalinity of a SOLUTION by the measurement of the inverse logarithm of the Hydrogen ion. Because it is the INVERSE LOGARITHM of the Hydrogen Ion the larger the pH value the Less Hydrogen ions and of course the lower the pH value the more Hydrogen Ions. A pH of 6 will have 10 time the number Hydrogen Ions as a pH of 7.

A simple $ 19.00 pH meter and pH up (Phosphoric acid) and pH Down (Bicarb) solves any problems of pH effecting the efficacy of a pesticide.

BTW most Whole Milk is 6.5 pH and can be used as a calibration for a pH meter.

pH reading of soil done in professional labs can vary greatly on the same sample. Since pH is the Measurement of Hydrogen Ions in a solution a solution must be added to the soil. Which MOLE SOLUTION is used will effect the number of hydrogen ions released in that sample. Therefore always use the same lab or same method and Mole solution when comparing soil sample history.

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