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  #1  
Old 04-01-2013, 06:49 PM
jhanes jhanes is offline
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Location: Massillon,Ohio
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?Starting a Bobcat/Skidsteer service?

I'm 18 and have been in landscaping since i was 10. Now i have my own accounts and work full time for a landscaper in the summer and soon to be full time as i graduate High School. Recently i came across a childhood dream of operating equipment and realised i could potentially make enough money this summer to buy an older Bobcat or skid steer of another brand. My questions are .....Is there enough room in the market for this or is it too flooded? Can i start off with just a skid steer and my F250 and wait and see if it works out before purchasing a dump? Also a rental company locally told me he has a S185 with 2500hrs he would sell for 12500. I am worried cuz its a rental and people beat on themn, but on the other hand they are maintenenced regulary. When do the engines usually need rebuilt? Any suggestions, stories or wisdom would be greatly apprciated. Thanks!!
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:01 PM
ScubaSteve728 ScubaSteve728 is offline
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if i were you id go to college while working on the side a college degree helps a lot in this very competitive business world. you could go to some sort of greens keeper school or agriculture school or even a construction school. and you will need proper licences just to legally run the skid if you are making money with it. dont buy an old rental machinery unless you know it was very well taken care of. you pretty much should get a dump to do proper bobcat work like hauling loom, debris or mulch unless you can borrow one.
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:05 PM
jhanes jhanes is offline
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Thanks, and also has anyone seen anybody use a roll-off(hook lift) truck to transport a skid steer as well as material to and from the job site?
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:47 PM
NEUSWEDE NEUSWEDE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhanes View Post
Thanks, and also has anyone seen anybody use a roll-off(hook lift) truck to transport a skid steer as well as material to and from the job site?
Like this: http://youtu.be/Bthep_aGGIU
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  #5  
Old 04-01-2013, 07:55 PM
jhanes jhanes is offline
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Thats pretty much what i was thinking, just maybe with a regular roll off dumpster you could drive into then pick it up and away you go. thanks for the idea of finding a nitchie, that could be key. I also wouldn't drop everything for doing this i would continue working and doing this on the side to see if it panned out, keep in mind Im also renting with the parents so i don't have much to loose....worse thing that could happen is i have to sell the machine.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:58 PM
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AEL AEL is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhanes View Post
Thanks, and also has anyone seen anybody use a roll-off(hook lift) truck to transport a skid steer as well as material to and from the job site?
We move all of our small machines with our roll off, and pull the larger machines on a 20 tonne tag behind it. For the work we do it is a perfect setup.
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Old 04-04-2013, 12:29 AM
jg244888 jg244888 is offline
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Originally Posted by AEL View Post
We move all of our small machines with our roll off, and pull the larger machines on a 20 tonne tag behind it. For the work we do it is a perfect setup.
do you need to strap equipment down when its in the bin?
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Old 04-04-2013, 08:13 PM
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AEL AEL is online now
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do you need to strap equipment down when its in the bin?
By law yes. Most people dont , i do. Think about the angle the machines are on when raising and lowering the bins, and any possible movement while driving.

I had to add a custom setup to my bins to tie the machines down, while at the same time allowing it not to get damaged when dumping concrete or asphalt.
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:33 PM
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Junior M Junior M is offline
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I'd try and find some work for the bobcat first..like branch off into sod and landscape construction since you already have a base in Landscaping.

Don't just go for a regular old do everything service. Have a specialty. And focus on that. It might take a while to find out what is gonna bring in the money but once you do stick with it.
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Old 04-04-2013, 09:47 AM
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YellowDogSVC YellowDogSVC is online now
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Originally Posted by Junior M View Post
I'd try and find some work for the bobcat first..like branch off into sod and landscape construction since you already have a base in Landscaping.

Don't just go for a regular old do everything service. Have a specialty. And focus on that. It might take a while to find out what is gonna bring in the money but once you do stick with it.
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When I went into business I tried to throw a wide net to "catch all" the world. Nearly 20 years later I still do a lot of services but found that the phone rang off the hook for all the little jobs that didn't pay. I
Focusing has helped me make a name for myself in my little area. I don't travel far and I'm home by dinner every night but that took quite a bit of focus and learning to say "no" to drilling 2 post holes just because I own an auger.
I would encourage you to learn as much as you can while you are just starting out but Junior's advice about having a specialty will set you apart from the run of the mill bobcat service guys who are all over Craigslist. When the economy is down, everybody and their brother is in business whether they have the skills or not. Just go to youtube and look "brush mulching." You will see absolute horror movies at one end of the spectrum and guys that are a natural extension of their machinery at the other end of the spectrum. I think that focus and repetitive practice makes the difference between average and good. You will naturally learn how to do a lot of things but following Junior's advice will help you achieve expert status sooner in that line of work that excites you. Good luck.
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