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  #1  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:15 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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I Need help getting lawns looking really nice

Hey guys,
I think something that is really holding me back is getting my lawns looking really nice. Since I refuse to use any non organic chemicals I am very limited. I have milorganite organic fertilizer, but that is it. Are there any organic post selective herbicides? I would really appreciate any help.
thanks so much
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  #2  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:29 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I've heard of no organic strategy that is worth the time and trouble involved... Salespeople talk a big game ,,, but in the real world it was a waste of time and money... If I'm wrong there will surely be some great Testimonials coming forth from those who love the stuff,,, and when those testimonials are shown to be truthful with good answers to the definitive questions, then I will apologize...

I spot spray so as to not saturate the ground with broadleaf herbicides... that's as organic as my "bridge"program gets...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #3  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:33 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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Here is a picture of the lawn
its on a steep hill, in the city, with a lot of shade
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  #4  
Old 09-24-2013, 01:30 PM
Victorsaur Victorsaur is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recycledsole View Post
Here is a picture of the lawn
its on a steep hill, in the city, with a lot of shade
I may be wrong but it sure looks like you have some brown patch going on in that photo. Above advice is good, although if you look hard enough it IS possible to get great results organically. Again, I would consult phasthound for advice. Stick to your guns and don't give in to the non organic way.
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  #5  
Old 09-24-2013, 07:08 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victorsaur View Post
I may be wrong but it sure looks like you have some brown patch going on in that photo. Above advice is good, although if you look hard enough it IS possible to get great results organically. Again, I would consult phasthound for advice. Stick to your guns and don't give in to the non organic way.
I was kind of riding the fence, but I agree if you think it's best or you and your community stick to it. I'll say a prayer for you and hope things work out. (I pray about my lawn) that's how much of a passion I have or a beautiful lawn. There are many great organic products out there, many just as we stated earlier, just do your homework and stay away from the gimmicks. I find the Ag center and university studies to be the best to follow, rather than sales advertisements on the products websites.
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:58 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazersandWildcats2009 View Post
... There are many great organic products out there, many just as we stated earlier, just do your homework and stay away from the gimmicks. I find the Ag center and university studies to be the best to follow, rather than sales advertisements on the products websites.
Define "great organic products"... What makes them great? what is their Mode of Operation(MO)?? will it benefit SOM, CEC, moisture/air ratio or what other benefit???
Improper use of anything renders it useless, so knowing the MO is the first thing to master... what is a "great organic product???"...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #7  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:40 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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I know if my lawns looked like this some other clients would be more interested.
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  #8  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:51 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Looks like it is dried out... organic can't replace water... Does water even soak in on that slope???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #9  
Old 09-21-2013, 04:46 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Looks like it is dried out... organic can't replace water... Does water even soak in on that slope???
Looks like some serious drainage issues. I'm far from a landscaper, but I would clear everything out all the way to dirt. Spray a herbicide, wait a month, or build a wall edging in the mean time. Haul in several tons of soil and level off the whole lawn, use the wall as a barricade. Lay sod over the top of the level soil. Possibly install irrigation before. (Something I didn't do, and I can tell you from experience it's a mess keeping sod moist for a month straight by regular sprinklers, but can be done.) Hopefully I can give some useful advice from the valuable information people have gave to me around here and take a little time off of their hands because I know Agrostics and a few of you others are BUSY outside.
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  #10  
Old 09-22-2013, 10:28 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazersandWildcats2009 View Post
Looks like some serious drainage issues. I'm far from a landscaper, but I would clear everything out all the way to dirt. Spray a herbicide, wait a month, or build a wall edging in the mean time. ...
On a slope you want every clump of grass you have... The ability to stop the water from running away and soak into the ground instead,,, is what grass is designed to do... mulch mowing is important to keep the dirt covered and possibly enable quicker infiltration...

I can't speak for you part of the country right now,,, but too much watering may quite easily cause hydrophobic surface... it is called Fall over seeding because the weather is cool and once you soak up a spot,,, you don't want to pound it with more irrigation...

The compost will also need a correct moisture/air ratio in order for the compost to actually grow the fungi that builds the soil structure, that opens the soil surface...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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