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Old 11-09-2013, 11:03 AM
Victorsaur Victorsaur is offline
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Flaws of super phosphate

Interesting article.. makes me wonder the best source of phosphate fertilizer.

http://www.malcolmbeck.com/articles/...dsolutions.htm
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:32 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Applying too much phosphorus, irregardless of source is not wise. Triple superphosphate simply made it cheaper and easier to do so. I get sky high P levels on a regular basis due to past misuse of 16-15-15, 10-30-10 or 10-20-20 AG fertilizers on lawns and landscapes. That does create the micronutrient deficiencies described in that link. Do not get the idea that adding micronutrients to the soil will fix the problem. High phosphorus levels in the plant tissues themselves bind to the micronutrients no matter how much is applied to the soil. What is applied in granules with micronutrients added is a fraction of the actual need. Do you know of any granule applying the equivalent of 1 lb ferrous sulfate and 4 oz zinc sulfate at label recommended rates. Those granules are ok for maintenance of areas where there are no problems. Not so much for deficiencies and imbalances.
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:39 PM
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Patriot Services Patriot Services is online now
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For the most part P is largely banned around here. Misplaced blame led to that.
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Old 11-09-2013, 04:03 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Has the source of P pollution in Florida been determined by a disinterested party? I think making grass starve and thin out during the wet season is hardly a way to prevent pollution. Hawaii is a little smarter. The regulators go after soil runoff entering waterways. That's right. Construction sites of any size must not allow dirt to run. There is a requirement to maintain vegetation on errodable slopes. Inspectors will respond to any reports of soil running down drains.
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Old 11-09-2013, 04:50 PM
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I believe so. A new house is going up across the street and the first thing in was the plastic dam and haybales around the storm drain.
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Old 11-12-2013, 12:47 PM
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Mscotrid Mscotrid is offline
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Originally Posted by Patriot Services View Post
I believe so. A new house is going up across the street and the first thing in was the plastic dam and haybales around the storm drain.
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I would believe that is more of a EPA sediment issue than phosphate
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Old 11-12-2013, 01:24 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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A main source of phosphate in our water is from erosion nor runoff or leaching.
Keeping soil onsite does more to reduce contamination than banning phosphates in fertilizers.
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Old 11-12-2013, 07:52 PM
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I agree, Barry. Phosphate does not move--it sticks to the soil. When soil moves, phosphate gets into the water. Soil erosion is the main contributor. Heavy rains flowing down on newly plowed and fertilized fields can be a major problem. Law requires erosion dams on new construction around here.
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Old 11-13-2013, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
I agree, Barry. Phosphate does not move--it sticks to the soil. When soil moves, phosphate gets into the water. Soil erosion is the main contributor. Heavy rains flowing down on newly plowed and fertilized fields can be a major problem. Law requires erosion dams on new construction around here.
That one basic point is so important and was overlooked or ignored by those who rushed to enact what was basically a trendy regulation here in Michigan. It began as municipal governments each having hearings, each with their own facts, then quickly jumped to the county level and finally to a statewide ban - all in an alarmingly short time. When I was in school we were taught that aerating was the best and only sure way to move P into the root zone because it is immobile in most soils.

Construction sites have been using dams around drains for a long time. Livestock waste runoff could stand another look. Guessing their PACs are stronger than turf's.

I had to file a plan for the Soil Erosion & Sedementation Act when I built our house and I am nowhere near water.
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Old 11-14-2013, 02:23 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Originally Posted by Mscotrid View Post
I would believe that is more of a EPA sediment issue than phosphate
By mitigating soil run off, you are also reducing nutrient pollution of waterways. A good thing.
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